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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

In-Service Training (NYPD)

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in In-Service Training (NYPD)

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
John Jay College of Criminal Justice.
Length:
40 hours (5 days).
Dates:
January 1995 - Present.*
Objectives:

Upon successful completion, students will be able to: explain the role of the undercover officer/agent in narcotics enforcement; describe common features of retail narcotics operations; identify resources, techniques, and tactics available to the undercover narcotics officer/agent; and apply narcotics interdiction techniques in simulations.

Instruction:

Major topics include: the role of undercover officers/agents in narcotics enforcement; electronic surveillance equipment; various functions involved in the operation of a retail narcotics distribution location; money laundering; risk management; role of the U.S. Customs Service in narcotics interdiction; vehicle and apartment ‘traps'; courtroom testimony; wiretaps; asset forfeiture; narcotics entry techniques; ‘buy and bust' operations; firearms tactics; tactical handcuffing.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice (11/94) (10/99 revalidation) (6/06 revalidation) (6/11 revalidation) (6/16 revalidation). *NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course is extended to individuals who completed study between December 1991 and January 1995 upon the successful completion of a current examination. The official transcript from the New York City Police Department will indicate whether an individual qualified under this special arrangement.

Location:
Parks Department, Olmstead Center, Flushing Meadow Park, Flushing, New York; Cathedral College, Jamaica, New York (through May 1996); St. John's University, Jamaica, NY (beginning June 1996).
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 35 hours (5 days). Version 3: 35 hours (5 days); participants also perform a formally evaluated on-the-job post-course assignment requiring approximately one month to complete. Version 4: 35 hours (5 days); participants also complete several post-course assignments in the form of crime prevention lectures and residential and small-scale commercial security surveys, satisfactory completion of which is tracked by the Crime Prevention Section. Version 5 and 6: 42 hours (6 days).

Dates:

Version 1: October 1987 - May 1992. Version 2: June 1992 - November 1997. Version 3: December 1997 - December 2001. Version 4: January 2002 - July 2006. Version 5: August 2006 - May 2018. Version 6: June 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion, students will be able to: recognize security vulnerability in residential and commercial settings; conduct security audits; speak on crime prevention. Version 3: Upon successful completion, students will be able to: recognize security vulnerability in residential and commercial settings; conduct security audits; speak on crime prevention; perform a large-scale security survey, make recommendations for security measures, and prepare a comprehensive written report. Version 4, 5 and 6: Upon successful completion, students will be able to: recognize security vulnerability in residential and commercial settings; conduct security audits; speak on crime prevention; and perform residential and small scale commercial security surveys.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Major topics include: concepts of crime prevention; how to write a survey; types of surveys; basics of locks and safes; basics of alarms; basics of interior and perimeter protection; lighting equipment and techniques; retail security; access control; basics of closed circuit television; glazing; public speaking. Version 3: Major topics include: concepts of crime prevention; how to write a survey; types of surveys; basics of locks and safes; basics of alarms; basics of interior and perimeter protection; lighting equipment and techniques; retail security; access control; basics of closed circuit television; security glazing; auto theft prevention; portable computer theft prevention; personal safety; public speaking. Version 4 and 5: Major topics include: concepts of crime prevention, including counter-terrorism; how to write a survey; types of surveys; basics of locks and safes; basics of alarms; basics of interior and perimeter protection; lighting equipment and techniques; biometrics; security engineering and design; retail security; access control; basics of closed circuit television; security glazing; auto theft prevention; portable computer theft prevention; personal safety; quality of life crimes; public speaking. Version 6: Major topics include: concepts of crime prevention; how to write a survey; types of surveys; basics of locks and safes; basics of alarms; basics of interior and perimeter protection; lighting equipment and techniques; biometrics; security engineering and design; retail security; access control; basics of closed circuit television; security glazing; auto theft prevention; portable computer theft prevention; personal safety; quality of life crimes; public speaking.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Criminal Justice or Security Administration (6/88). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Criminal Justice or 2 semester hours in Security Administration (3/93 revalidation). Version 3, 4, and 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Criminal Justice or 3 semester hours in Security Administration (4/98 revalidation) (6/03 revalidation) (5/08 revalidation) (5/13 revalidation). Version 6: in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Criminal Justice or 3 semester hours in Secuirty Administration (6/18 revalidation).

Formerly:
Applicant Processing Division Seminar
Location:
Police Academy, 235 E 20th Street, New York, NY
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 70 hours (2 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: April 2001 - June 2016.* Version 2: July 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion, students will be able to conduct a police officer candidate background investigation; use effective interviewing techniques; obtain documentation required for a background investigation; synopsize documentation into a case review; recognize conditions in which cases may be closed.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Candidate selection process; screening process; required areas of candidate qualification; criteria for disqualification; differentiating between questioning and interviewing; planning and organizing interviews; detection of deception in an interview situation; verbal and nonverbal communication; obtaining documentation required for a background investigation; assembling documentation into a case review; closing cases.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours as an elective in Criminal Justice (6/01) (6/06 revalidation) (6/11 revalidation). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours as an elective in Criminal Justice (6/16 revalidation).  *NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course is extended to individuals who completed study between February 1996 and March 2001 upon the successful completion of all current examinations required in the course. The official transcript from the New York City Police Department will indicate whether an individual qualified under this special arrangement.

Location:
Various locations in New York City.
Length:
70 hours (2 weeks).
Dates:
June 1996 - Present.*
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to collect the information necessary to make the following determinations in motor vehicle accidents involving fatalities or near-fatalities: is criminality involved, were any violations of the law committed, and what were the contributing factors that caused the accident.

Instruction:

Major topics include: penal law pertaining to accident investigation; field testing for alcohol; data necessary to document an accident; field sketching and diagramming accident scenes; photographing accident scenes; tests of the operator, vehicle and road surface to determine contributing factors of an accident; mathematical formulas and computations used in analyzing accident scenes; interviewing principals and witnesses; and preparing written reports on accidents.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice (4/98) (6/03 revalidation) (5/08 revalidation) (5/13 revalidation) (6/18 revalidation). *NOTE: Credit is recommended for individuals who completed this course between April 1993 and May 1996 if they complete all required course examinations at some point after June 1996. The official transcript from the New York City Police Department will indicate whether an individual qualified under this special arrangement.

Location:
130-30 28th Avenue, College Point, NY
Length:

Version 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6: 105 hours (3 weeks). Version 7: 70 hours.

Dates:

Version 1: February 1976 - April 1985. Version 2: May 1985 - December 1990. Version 3: January 1991 - August 1996. Version 4: September 1996 - February 1998. Version 5: March 1998 - February 1999. Version 6: March 1999 - June 2016. Version 7: July 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: To provide law enforcement personnel with an understanding of the theory and practice of criminal investigation. Version 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to apply the approved principles of criminal investigation to the various types of crimes; cite applicable court decisions, constitutional and penal laws.

Instruction:

Version 1: Topics include: the law and investigative techniques as they relate to specialized types of investigation, such as those relating to organized crime, drug abuse, stolen credit cards, and juvenile offenders; the development of verbal skills and strategies for interviewing in various criminal situations; standards of proof; surveillance techniques; courtroom testimony. The course includes guest lectures by experts in special topics and practical exercises in field investigations. Version 2 and 3: Topics include: constitutional and penal law; crime scene investigation; homicide investigation; sex crime investigation; interviewing and interrogation; forensic evidence; other investigative topics, including terrorism, hostages, arson, and civil liability. Version 4: All topics in Version 3; in addition, check fraud, police impersonation investigations, computer crimes. Version 5: Topics include: constitutional and penal law; crime scene investigation; homicide investigation; sex crime investigation; interviewing and interrogation; forensic evidence; other investigative topics, including terrorism, hostages, arson, and civil liability; check fraud; police impersonation investigations; computer crimes; COMPSTAT; capital homicide cases. Version 6 and 7: All topics in Version 5; in addition, robbery investigation, and line-up, photo arrays, and show-ups.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice or Criminal Science (10/76) (10/86 revalidation) (1/91 revalidation) (5/96 revalidation) (5/01 revalidation) (6/06 revalidation) (6/11 revalidation) (6/16 revalidation).  NOTE: for Versions 1-5: This is an advanced investigative course, which overlaps the Criminal Investigation course offered as part of recruit training. A college should carefully consider the granting of credit to students for both courses because of the similarity in subject matter covered. This Note does not apply to Version 6 or 7.

Location:

Office of the Chief Medical Examiner; 421 East 26th Street New York, NY

Length:

Version 1, 2, and 3: 70 hours (2 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: October 1976 - December 1982. Version 2: January 1984 - December 1990. Version 3: January 1991 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to provide the experienced investigator with an understanding of advanced techniques in the field of homicide investigations. Version 3: Students will be able to: identify and explain the necessary legal and forensic requirements of a homicide investigation; apply principles of homicide investigation to various types of cases; and explain the interaction of the different components of the criminal justice system regarding homicide cases.

Instruction:

Version 1: The class focuses on comprehensive and intensive treatment of concepts and techniques in homicide investigations.Other topics include: law of homicide; typologies of homicide, such as sudden, suspicious, and violent death, sex-oriented and other felony homicides, and traumatic deaths; interaction of the components of the criminal justice system in homicide cases. Version 2 and 3: Topics include: comprehensive and intensive treatment of concepts and techniques in homicide investigations, law of homicide; typologies of homicide, such as sudden, suspicious, and violent death, sex-oriented and other felony homicides, and traumatic deaths; interaction of the components of the criminal justice system in homicide cases; medical examiners; psychological profiling; unusual homicides; contemporary issues in homicide investigations. Prerequisite: Criminal Investigation, or Basic Criminal Investigator’s Course, or an equivalent course.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, and 3: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice or Criminal Science (10/76) (10/86 revalidation) (1/91 revalidation) (5/96 revalidation) (5/01 revalidation) (6/06 revalidation) (6/11 revalidation) (6/16 revalidation).

Location:

Various locations in New York City

Length:

35 hours. 

Dates:

February 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to identify cues and behaviors associated with deception, analyze and document observations, develop interview strategies, and conduct effective interrogations.

Instruction:

This classroom based course is designed to teach students how to obtain information effectively through various interview and interrogation techniques. Topics include: behavioral analysis, effective interviewing techniques, and interrogation methods.Interrogation techniques instruction includes: Collection and preparation prior to an interrogation, questioning techniques, legal guidelines for custodial interrogations, developing rapport, electronically recording video interrogations, verifiable defense, statement analysis, elicitation techniques, detecting deception, working with translators.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice or Police Science (6/16). 

Location:

Office of the Chief Medical Examiner; 421 East 26th Street New York, NY

Length:

Version 1, 2, 3 and 4: 35 hours (1 week).

Dates:

Version 1: October 1976 - December 1982. Version 2: January 1984 - December 1990. Version 3: January 1991 - September 1995.
Version 4: October 1995 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to provide the experienced investigator with an understanding of advanced techniques in the field of sex crimes investigation. Version 3 and 4: Students will be able to: apply principles of sex crimes investigation to various cases and apply theories of the psychology of the sex crime victim to working with the victim effectively.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: crisis intervention techniques: theory of victimization; psychology of the sex crime victim; sex crime laws; sexual deviations; evidence gathering and search of the crime scene; trial testimony. Prerequisite: Criminal Investigation, or Basic Criminal Investigator’s Course, or an equivalent course. Version 2 and 3: Topics include: crisis intervention techniques: theory of victimization; psychology of the sex crime victim; sex crime laws; sexual deviations; evidence gathering and search of the crime scene; trial testimony; sensitivity training; child victims. Prerequisite: Criminal Investigation, or Basic Criminal Investigator’s Course, or an equivalent course. Version 4:  Topics include: crisis intervention techniques: theory of victimization; psychology of the sex crime victim; sex crime laws; sexual deviations; evidence gathering and search of the crime scene; trial testimony; sensitivity training; child victims; domestic violence, rape trauma syndrome, acquaintance rape, DNA testing, suspect and victim interviewing (including child interviewing. Prerequisite: Criminal Investigation, or Basic Criminal Investigator’s Course, or an equivalent course.)

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, 3 and 4: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Criminal Science, or Social Science (10/76) (10/86 revalidation) (1/91 revalidation) (5/96 revalidation) (5/01 revalidation) (6/06 revalidation) (6/11 revalidation) (6/16 revalidation).

Location:
Emergency Service Unit, Flushing Meadow Park, Corona, NY (through July 1995); Floyd Bennett Field, Brooklyn, NY (beginning August 1995).
Length:

Version 1, 2 and 3: 120 hours (3 weeks). Version 4: 136 hours (3.5 weeks). Version 5: 150.5 hours (4 weeks); includes 8 hours of clinical rotation. Version 6: 188 hours (5 weeks); includes 16 hours of clinical rotation. 

Dates:

Version 1: July 1983 - March 1993. Version 2: April 1993 - August 1994. Version 3: September 1994 - December 1998. Version 4: January 1999 - December 1999. Version 5: January 2000 - May 2017. Version 6: June 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss basic human anatomy and physiology; discuss the rationale and fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient with suspected respiratory or circulatory distress and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clearing an obstructed airway; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock, internal hemorrhage, and external hemorrhage, central nervous system disorders and deficiency, and types and degree of burns; perform immobilization techniques; on an obstetrical manikin, prepare a mother for a cephalic birth; demonstrate the procedure for dealing with an emotionally disturbed patient; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging, and removal from the scene; discuss patient safety and care at the scene and during transport; file a standardized NYS Patient Care Report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; demonstrate appropriate diagnostic and emergency treatment procedures; demonstrate the proper use and care of emergency equipment. Version 3, 4, 5 and 6: All outcomes in Version 1 and 2; in addition, demonstrate proper use of semi-automatic defibrillator.

Instruction:

Version 1: This course is designed to provide the basic education needed by emergency medical technicians to provide patient care in the pre-hospital setting. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the emergency medical technician as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student will be expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of four divisions: basic life support, trauma care, medical/environmental, and operations, and six practical skills areas: patient assessment, airway management and oxygen, bleeding control and fracture management, traction and splinting, spinal immobilization, and shock management. The course leads to NYS certification as an Emergency Medical Technician. Version 2: All topics in Version 1; in addition, critical trauma care skills, pre-hospital pediatric trauma care skills, hazardous materials, blood-borne pathogens and universal precautions, gunshot wounds, blunt trauma, and auto extrication. Version 3 and 4: All topics in Version 2; in addition, defibrillation of cardiac arrest victims. Version 5 and 6: This course is designed to provide the basic education needed by emergency medical technicians to provide patient care in the pre-hospital setting. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the emergency medical technician as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student will be expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion The curriculum consists of seven divisions: preparation, airway, patient assessment, medical emergencies, trauma, infants and children, operations; and six practical skills areas: patient trauma assessment, patient medical assessment, cardiac arrest management, airway management, spinal immobilization, and fracture immobilization. In addition, the following areas are emphasized: critical trauma care skills, pre-hospital pediatric trauma care skills, hazardous materials, blood-borne pathogens and universal precautions, gunshot wounds, blunt trauma, and auto extrication, automated external defibrillation. Graduates of the course are eligible to sit for the New York State EMT Certification Examination.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care (7/88). Version 2, 3, 4 and 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, or Emergency Medical Care (3/93 revalidation) (4/98 revalidation) (6/03 revalidation) (5/08 revalidation) (5/13 revalidation). Version 6: In the lower division baccalaureate / associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 11 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Management, or Emergency Medical Care (6/17 revalidation).

Location:
Emergency Service Unit, Flushing Meadow Park, Corona, NY (through July 1995); Floyd Bennett Field, Brooklyn, NY (beginning August 1995).
Length:

Version 1: 53 hours (1.5 weeks). Version 2 and 3: 64 hours (1.5 weeks).

Dates:
Version 1: April 1993 - December 1998. Version 2: January 1999 - December 1999. Version 3: January 2000 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1, 2 and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss basic human anatomy and physiology; discuss the rationale and fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient with suspected respiratory or circulatory distress and performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clearing an obstructed airway; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock, internal hemorrhage, and external hemorrhage, central nervous system disorders and deficiency, and types and degree of burns; perform immobilization techniques; on an obstetrical manikin, prepare a mother for a cephalic birth; demonstrate the procedure for dealing with an emotionally disturbed patient; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging, and removal from the scene; discuss patient safety and care at the scene and during transport; file a standardized NYS Patient Care Report; discuss the role and responsibilities of the EMT in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job; demonstrate appropriate diagnostic and emergency treatment procedures; and demonstrate the proper use and care of emergency equipment.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course reviews the content of the Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course, updates any changes in medical techniques and practices, and covers current trends and issues. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the emergency medical technician as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student is expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of four divisions: basic life support, trauma care, medical/environmental, and operations; and six practical skills areas: patient assessment, airway management and oxygen, bleeding control and fracture management, traction and splinting, spinal immobilization, and shock management. In addition, the following areas are emphasized: medical terminology, medical emergencies, pathophysiology, pediatric emergencies, hazardous materials awareness. Graduates of this course are eligible to recertify as EMTs by sitting for the New York State EMT Certification Examination. (Prerequisite: New York State certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.) Version 3: This course reviews the content of the Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course, updates any changes in medical techniques and practices, and covers current trends and issues. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the emergency medical technician as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student is expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illnesses and injuries and application of proper procedures of emergency care. Demonstration, practice, and clinical observation are carefully integrated into the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of seven divisions: preparation, airway, patient assessment, medical emergencies, trauma, infants and children, operations; and six practical skills areas: patient trauma assessment, patient medical assessment, cardiac arrest management, airway management, spinal immobilization, and fracture immobilization. In addition, the following areas are emphasized: medical terminology, medical emergencies, pathophysiology, pediatric emergencies, hazardous materials awareness. Graduates of this course are eligible to recertify as EMTs by sitting for the New York State EMT Certification Examination. Prerequisite: New York State certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Management or Emergency Medical Care (4/98) (6/03 revalidation) (5/08 revalidation) (5/13 revalidation) (6/17 revalidation). NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course is not considered duplicative of the Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Course. Credit should only be awarded for successful completion of this course only once. Students are not permitted to challenge exams in this course.

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