Skip to main content

National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Civilian Training

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

11 Metro Tech, Brooklyn N.Y. 11201; 350 Marconi St, Bronx, NY 10461.

Length:

Course 1: 385 hours and 32 weeks of supervised practical internship; Course 2: 210 hours and 32 weeks of supervised practical internship. 

Dates:

Course 1:  January 2015 - Present.  Course 2: January 2015 – Present. 

Objectives:

Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: assess the role of policing, and perform the duties of a Police Communications Technician by developing the key skills and techniques of a calltaker and radio dispatcher; explain the Police Department’s Communication Section rules and regulations as well as the roles, responsibilities and qualities required of a Police Communications Technician; use radio signal codes; analyze common crime definitions and apply to emergency and non-emergency incidents received at the 911 call center; utilize communication technology systems such as I/CAD; VESTA and demonstrate an understanding of the functions and features such as TTY, Back Up Ani Ali Retrieval System (BARS), Master Volume, Quick Keys, Queue Display and Caller Information Display (CID); demonstrate effective communication techniques including information gathering, active listening skills and conflict management; and demonstrate mapping skills. Course 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: evaluate policing in a modern society, define and describe general dispatching procedures; select proper radio terminology; utilize the Radio Master Control Panel; analyze and describe how to coordinate a citywide effort during critical incidents; explain the operational procedures and protocols when handling 10-13 incidents, fire calls, rapid mobilizations, kidnappings, active shooter incidents and critical events to ensure the safety of the officers and the public; and apply dispatching techniques along with I/CAD formats to properly assign units to emergency incidents within the five boroughs. 

Instruction:

Course 1 and 2: Major topics include: Policing in a modern society; role of policing; NYPD rules and regulations, calltaking procedures, crime definitions, radio code signals, computer aided dispatch (CAD) system and VESTA telephone systems, geographical layout of NYC, communication techniques, active shooter procedures, customer service skills, structured information gathering, New York State Right to Know Laws; Equal Employment Opportunity, stress awareness and stress management, utilizing radio terminology, prioritizing emergency events, Telecommunication Device for the Deaf (TDD) and handling calls for the Deaf, hearing/speech impaired community, radio dispatching functions and procedures, and computerized data systems. Throughout both courses students conduct hands on training with tenured employees to practice and apply the material taught.  In addition to the Police Communication Technician Courses, students engage in supervised field experience on the operational floor for a total of 64 weeks.  Training officers and the Quality Assurance Section (QAS) closely observe progress by conducting monitoring and bi-monthly observations.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Police Administration, Public Safety or as a Communications elective and 3 semester hours as an Internship in Police Administration, Police Operations, Public Safety or as a Communications elective (8/17).  NOTE: Students must successfully complete Course 1 and Course 2 to access credit recommendations. 

Formerly:
Basic Course for Peace Officers Without Firearms; Also known as School Safety Recruit Training Course
Location:

Brooklyn Technical High School, 29 Fort Greene Pl, Brooklyn, NY (January 2001-October 2008); Police Academy, 235 E20th St, New York, NY (October 2008 - October 2014); Police Academy (College Point), 130-30 28th Ave, Flushing, NY (October 2014 - present)

Length:

Version 4: 595 hours.

Dates:

Version 4: February 2014 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: perform the duties of a school safety officer in a pro-active, problem-solving capacity, identifying problems or conditions and developing strategies to address them, delivering the services, and analyzing their effectiveness; maintain a rigorous physical routine and the tactical knowledge necessary to protect oneself and others.

Instruction:

Version 4: The components listed below constitute the NYPD School Safety Officer Course (formerly known as Basic Course for Peace Officers Without Firearms; also known as School Safety Recruit Training) conducted by the New York City Police Academy. This intensive program consists of classroom instruction and field instruction. Due to the integrated nature of the curriculum, the descriptions, which appear below, reflect the major themes that thread through the program and correspond to content areas and course titles within degree programs where credit may be awarded. Students must successfully complete all components listed below that comprise the NYPD School Safety Course to access credit recommendations.

1. School Police Patrol Operations
Instruction: This component provides the specific functions of the roles and responsibilities of the school safety officer (peace officer) working within the Department of Education’s school facilities. Recruits are introduced to the Department of Education’s hierarchy structure as well school governance at the local level and citywide level. Recruits are educated in; the various forms of school patrol initiatives, visitor control procedures, field communications, metal detection and scanning. Recruits also train on live equipment during workshops. (Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Police Science or Criminal Justice).

2. Physical Education
Part 1: Foundations of Physical Fitness
Part 2: Defensive Tactics
Part 3: American Heart Association Basic Life Support
Instruction: Part 1: Major topics include: Survey of physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of physical fitness; neuro­muscular skill and biomechanics, scientific approach toward assessing entry-level overall physical fitness, and methods of improving and maintaining physical fitness; role of physical conditioning, nutrition, and basic health habits. Part 2: Major topics include: theory, skills, and practice of judo, karate, and techniques from selected martial arts including basic blows, throws, blocks and defenses; application of these skills to combative situations. Defense skills necessary to protect oneself when securing an arrest and confinement are also stressed, including unarmed self-defense. Part 3: Major topics include: theory and practice of first aid procedures in emergency situations (shock, wounds, heart attacks, strokes) and extrications in dangerous situations; instruction in basic skills of cardio­pulmonary resuscitation, including use of automatic external defibrillators. American Red Cross certification in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation is issued. (Credit Recommendation: Part 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Physical Education. Part 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Physical Education Activity Elective.Part 3 :In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Physical Education).

3. Procedural Law

Instruction:This component is a survey of the statutory law, judicial decisions, and administrative policies that define a school safety officer’s (peace officer’s) authority to arrest, to use force. The steps in the judicial processes initiated when school safety officers (peace officers) effect arrests are discussed. (Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Law, Police Science or Criminal Justice).

4. School Policing Crisis Intervention

Instruction:This component provides practical applications of theory and police department procedure designed to assist school safety officers (peace officers) in interacting effectively and humanely with children and adolescents, crime victims, suspects, and parties to disputes, family violence, and other interpersonal crises. (Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Police Science or Criminal Justice).

5. School Police Field Problems

Instruction:This component covers the various types of field problems that a school safety officer (peace officer) may have to respond to in a school facility. The school safety officer’s (peace officer’s) ability to protect lives, rights, and property while responding to critical events, such as disorders and reports of violent crimes in progress is stressed. Emphasis is placed on establishing and maintaining a working collaboration between the school safety officer (peace officer) and the Department of Education school administrators.   Role plays and debriefings are provided.  (Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Police Science or Criminal Justice).

6. School Police Investigation and Reporting
Instruction:This component covers the proper selection, preparation, and use of Department of Education, police department and other governmental reports to facilitate proactive security operation within school facilities, police crime-fighting and order maintenance tasks; computer applications in school police investigations, emphasizing access to official data bases.(Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Police Science or Criminal Justice).

7. School Policing in a Democracy
Instruction: This component is an introduction to the role of the school safety officer (peace officer) in the school communities that they will serve with emphasis on the legal and ethical bases of their legal authority and accountability. Law enforcement professionalism and responsiveness to a diverse and changing community; structure of the NYPD and School Safety Division; and the statutory, judicial, and administrative mechanisms that define and enforce the limits of law enforcement discretion are emphasized. (Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Police Science or Criminal Justice).

8. School Policing Special Populations
Instruction: Detailed examinations of problems and issues presented by major subpopulations within the vast New York City Department of Education, and of the effects upon school safety officers (peace officers) of constant exposure to troubled people; identification and analysis of strategies and techniques useful during interactions with children and adolescents, families of missing persons, the mentally and emotionally disturbed, and other people in crisis; discussion of techniques and departmental services available to school safety officers (peace officers) suffering from job or other personal stress. (Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Police Science or Criminal Justice).

9. Substantive Law
Instruction: This component provides an analysis of the theories and reasoning underlying laws that define specific criminal offenses, with detailed treatment of major crime categories encountered by school safety officers (peace officers). Components of weapons laws, drug offenses, crimes against persons, including domestic violence, larceny and property offenses, including theft, and offenses against public order and the public trust are discussed. (Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Law, Police Science or Criminal Justice).

10. Terrorism Awareness and Emergency Preparedness Instruction: This component identifies the fundamental and underlying reasons why America and specifically New York City is a target for terrorists, framed in a discussion of the differences among various terrorist organizations and their terrorist tactics, and the ideological bases for terrorism.  Additionally, the course discusses the various government agencies that are involved in fighting terrorism and the importance of front-line law enforcement in obtaining and forwarding intelligence to investigating federal, state, and local agencies. Students are briefed daily on local and global events as to their potential effect on patrolling a very diverse school population. Emphasis is also placed on the active shooter phenomenon in particular school shootings and Tactical Combat Casualty Care medical triage. (Credit recommendation: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Police Science or Criminal Justice).

Credit recommendation:

Version 4: A total of 26 semester hours in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category (15 semester hours in Police Science or Criminal Justice; 5 semester hours in Physical Education; and 6 semester hours in Introduction to Law, Police Science or Criminal Justice), distributed as noted above in the 'Instruction' section across 10 content areas, grouped alphabetically (6/15 administrative review) (6/16). NOTE: Students must successfully complete all content areas that comprise the NYPD School Safety Course to access credit recommendations for the course. *Earlier versions, dated prior to February 2014 can be found in the Civilian Training (NYPD) - Retired Courses section.

Formerly:
Police Administrative Aide
Location:
130-30 28th Avenue, College Point, NY
Length:

Version 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5: 210 hours (6 weeks); includes approximately 75 hours of criminal justice-related instruction.  Version 6: 210 hours (6 weeks); classroom portion includes approximately 75 hours of criminal justice-related instruction; in addition, course participants complete a minimum of 35 hours of supervised field training. Version 7: 265 hours (7 - 9 weeks)

Dates:

Version 1: March 1990 - October 1993.  Version 2: November 1993 - February 1997.  Version 3: March 1997 - September 1997.  Version 4: October 1997 - December 2000.   Version 5: January 2001 -February 2002.  Version 6: March 2002 - May 2016. Version 7: June 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion, students will be able to identify and explain basic concepts of police science, law, and social science, and apply these concepts to the daily routine administration of a law enforcement organization. Version 3, 4,  5, 6, and 7: Upon successful completion, students will be able to: identify and explain basic concepts of police science, law, and social science, and apply these concepts to the daily routine administration of a law enforcement organization; use effective telephone communication techniques in an office setting; prepare reports, letters, and memos using word processing; use on-line information systems.

Instruction:

Version 1: Topics include: police organizational structure; processing civilian complaints; aided cases; missing persons reports; accident reports; property; penal law; criminal procedural law; categories of offenses; culpable mental states; crisis intervention; stress awareness. Between the dates indicated for this version, additional topics in office automation were not evaluated or recommended for credit. Version 2: All topics in Version 1; in addition, community policing. Version 3: Topics include: police organizational structure; processing civilian complaints; aided cases; missing persons reports; accident reports; property; penal law; criminal procedural law; categories of offenses; culpable mental states; crisis intervention; stress awareness; community policing; key-boarding; proofreading skills; telephone techniques; word processing, including formatting, editing, merging, columns; on-line information systems. Version 4: Topics include: police organizational structure; processing civilian complaints; aided cases; missing persons reports; accident reports; property; penal law; criminal procedural law; categories of offenses; culpable mental states; crisis intervention; stress awareness; courtesy, professionalism, and respect; key-boarding; proofreading skills; telephone techniques; word processing, including formatting, editing, merging, columns; on-line information systems. Version 5, 6, and 7: All topics in Version 4; in addition, introduction to computer hardware and the Windows XP operating system.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as an elective in Criminal Justice (1/91) (5/96 revalidation). Version 3, 4 and 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as an elective in Criminal Justice, and 3 semester hours as an elective in Office Technology or Office Automation Systems (11/96) (5/01 revalidation). Version 6 and 7: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as an elective in Criminal Justice, and 4 semester hours as an elective in Office Technology or Office Automation Systems  (6/06 revalidation) (6/11 revalidation) (6/16 revalidation).

Location:
130-30 28th Avenue, College Point, NY
Length:

Version 1, 2, 3 and 4: 70 hours (4 or 5 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: February 1990 - February 1991. Version 2: March 1991 - April 1991. Version 3 : December 1999 - August 2004. Version 4: September 2004 - September 2014. Version 5: October 2014 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5: Upon successful completion, students will be able to: explain the role of managers in organizations; describe principles of good communication; describe various theories of motivation and apply them to case problems; describe principles of team building; set goals according to established criteria; classify and describe leadership styles; conduct interviews; explain principles of effective time management; identify issues of ethics in management; and use problem-solving and decision-making techniques.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5: Major topics include: communication skills, motivation skills, group dynamics and group interaction; leadership styles; leadership skills; goal setting skills; delegation; problem-solving; decision-making; ethical awareness; New York State Right to Know Laws; Equal Employment Opportunity; drug awareness; AIDS awareness; stress awareness and stress management; employee assistance programs; and employee evaluation.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Supervision. Version 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Supervision (1/91) (10/99 revalidation). NOTE: The credit recommendation in Version 2 reflects a reconsideration of this course following the implementation of additional testing. Version 4: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Supervision (10/04 revalidation) (10/09 revalidation). NOTE: The credit recommendation in Version 4 reflects a reconsideration of this course due to an enhanced emphasis on problem-solving and decision-making scenarios.Version 5: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Supervision or Management (10/14 revalidation).  NOTE: The credit recommendation in Version 5 reflects a reconsideration of this course due to enhanced emphasis on management.

Top