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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Student Officer Training Program - Inactive Courses

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Police Academy, 235 East 20th St., New York, NY.
Length:
30 hours (10 weeks).
Dates:
May 1994 - October 1995.
Objectives:
Describe the role of the police officer in modern culture, including legal, ethical, and practical aspects of urban policing; identify stresses on police officers; explain the value of modern strategies such as problem solving and community policing; explain the need for effective liaisons with other government agencies and private industry; describe the role of the media in police work; explain the importance of skillful research and analysis in modern policing.
Instruction:
Myths and learned behavior; historical development of the New York City Police Department; the role and function of police in society; styles of policing; the police culture; police and the public; police and the black community; police and the Latino community; institutions and secrecy; police, the media and public opinion; police and the political system; attacking quality of life issues through problem solving; philosophy, history and benefits of community policing; women in policing; interagency conflict and cooperation; stress management; law and its impact on police policy. This course serves as a capstone learning experience for students completing their Academy training with a baccalaureate degree.  Participants complete a structured research paper under the guidance of a mentor/instructor.
Credit recommendation:
In the graduate degree category, 2 semester hours in Criminal Justice (11/94).
Location:
Police Academy, 235 East 20th St., New York, NY.
Length:
Version 1: 75 hours. Version 2 or 3: 59 hours. Version 4: 60 hours (8 weeks). Version 5: 60 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:
Version 1: December 1973 - December 1979. Version 2: January 1980 - January 1988. Version 3: February 1988 - December 1990. Version 4: January 1991 - February 1992. Version 5: March 1992 - May 1995.*
Objectives:
Version 1, 2, or 3:   To provide the student with knowledge of his/her role in the community and the expectations of the community he/she serves. Version 4 or 5: Describe criminal and noncrime-related events and their underlying issues in the community that fall within the responsibility of the police department; explain the role of the police officer in the community with regard to criminal and noncriminal activity; describe techniques for intervention in criminal and noncriminal matters.
Instruction:

Version 1: Exploration of the etiology, manifestations, and proposed solutions for non crime-related problems that the police service is called upon to resolve.  Discussion of children, adolescents, and the problem of juvenile delinquency; intergroup relations, communications theory, and interviewing; crisis intervention and conflict management; treatment of geographical structures and ethnic communities in New York City. Version 2: Exploration of the manifestations and proposed solutions for non crime-related problems that the police service is called upon to resolve.  Discussion of children, adolescents and the problem of juvenile delinquency, and the elderly; intergroup relations, communications theory, and interviewing; crisis intervention and conflict management; victimology; an overview of community resources; treatment of geographical structures and ethnic communities in New York City. Version 3 or 4: Exploration of the manifestations and proposed solutions for non crime-related problems that the police service is called upon to resolve.  Discussion of children, adolescents and the problem of juvenile delinquency, and the elderly; intergroup relations, communications theory, and interviewing; crisis intervention and conflict management; victimology; an overview of community resources; treatment of geographical structures and ethnic communities in New York City; bias/prejudice; suicide; non-custody emotionally disturbed persons.  Version 5: Exploration of the manifestations and proposed solutions for non crime-related problems that the police service is called upon to resolve. Discussion of children, adolescents and the problem of juvenile delinquency, and the elderly; intergroup relations, communications theory, and interviewing; crisis intervention and conflict management; victimology; an overview of community resources; treatment of geographical structures and ethnic communities in New York City; bias/prejudice; suicide; non-custody emotionally disturbed persons; values in policing; equal employment opportunity under Title VII Law; sexual harassment; the gay and lesbian community.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1:  In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Social Science or Social Work (8/74).   Version 2, 3, 4 or 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice, Applied Social Science, Applied Sociology, or Social Work (4/85 revalidation) (1/91 revalidation).  *NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course's instructional content continues in the course exhibit titled Selected Topics in Behavioral Science for Police Officers.

Location:
Police Academy, 235 East 20th St., New York, NY.
Length:
Version 1: 60 hours. Version 2: 62 hours. Version 3: 49 hours (62 weeks). Version 4: 80 hours (26 weeks).
Dates:
Version 1: December 1973 - August 1979. Version 2: September 1979 - December 1990. Version 3: January 1991 - December 1993. Version 4: January 1994 - December 1999.*
Objectives:
Version 1: To provide the student with knowledge of his/her responsibilities as the first police representative at the crime scene. Version 2: To provide the student with knowledge of his/her responsibilities in responding to the investigation and protection of potential and actual crime scenes and incidents requiring investigations. Version 3 or 4: Describe the responsibilities of a police officer in responding to, investigating and protecting potential and actual crime scenes and incidents requiring investigations.
Instruction:
Version 1: General principles of investigation, with suggested procedures for specific types of law violators; reporting procedures necessary for statistical studies and specialist follow-up; aspects of crime prevention as they relate to the police officer's role. Version 2: General principles of investigation, with suggested procedures for specific types of law violators; responding to calls; preliminary investigations; investigation of complaints, aided cases, accident cases; developing and handling physical evidence; safeguarding and continuity of physical evidence/property; investigation of corruption and civilian complaints. Version 3 or 4: General principles of investigation, with suggested procedures for specific type of law violators; responding to calls; preliminary investigations; investigation of complaints, aided cases, accident cases; developing and handling physical evidence; safeguarding and continuity of physical evidence/property; investigation of corruption and civilian complaints.
Credit recommendation:
Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Justice (8/74). Version 2 or 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Criminal Investigation or Criminal Justice (4/85 revalidation) (1/91 revalidation). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Criminal Investigation or Criminal Justice (5/96 revalidation). *NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course's instructional content continues in the course exhibit titled Police Science.
Location:
Police Academy, 235 East 20th St., New York, NY.
Length:
Version 1: 63 hours. Version 2: 62 hours (11 weeks). Version 3: 65 hours (11 weeks).
Dates:
Version 1: December 1973 - May 1980. Version 2: June 1980 - January 1988. Version 3: February 1988 - December 1999.*
Objectives:
Version 1 or 2: To provide the student with practical working knowledge of specific criminal offenses. Version 3: Identify the more commonly invoked criminal statutes and recognize their applications to specific situations.
Instruction:
Version 1 or 2: Comprehensive analysis of criminal law and procedures; methods of interpretation of criminal statutes; statutory definitions of crime; study of case law related to criminal statutes and applications to specific situations. Emphasis is on the underlying framework of criminal law. Version 3: Comprehensive analysis of criminal law and procedures; methods of interpretation of criminal statutes; statutory definitions of crime; study of case law related to criminal statutes and applications to specific situations. Emphasis is on the underlying framework of criminal law; treatment of the progression of the use of force.
Credit recommendation:
Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Criminal Justice or Criminology (8/74). Version 2 or 3 : In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Criminal Justice (4/85 revalidation) (1/91 revalidation) (5/96 revalidation). *NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course's instructional content continues in the course exhibit titled Law.
Location:
Designated field training locations throughout the City of New York.
Length:
Version 1 or 2: 204 hours (24 weeks). Version 3: 260 hours (26 weeks); in addition, approximately 25 hours per week of on-the-job practice. Version 4: 48 hours (24 weeks); in addition, approximately 35 hours per week of on-the-job practice. Version 5: 48 hours (16 weeks); in addition, approximately 35 hours per week of on-the-job practice.
Dates:
Version 1: April 1987 - September 1990.* Version 2: October 1990 - September 1992. Version 3: October 1992 - March 1994. Version 4: April 1994 - January 1999. Version 5: February 1999 - June 2003.
Objectives:
Version 1 or 2: Apply police theory and technique to actual field experiences. Version 3, 4, or 5: Utilize the tenets of community policing; prepare and issue summonses; properly complete all Police Department related paper work; stop, question, and frisk suspects; utilize proper and safe street tactics; make arrests; correctly respond to radio runs; safeguard crime scenes; effectively testify during a court appearance; safely conduct auto stops; direct traffic; effectively deal with the homeless and mentally disturbed.
Instruction:
Version 1: Structured field experience with intensive practical application of that study, under the direct tutelage of specially trained Sergeant trainers. Criminal justice procedures; precinct organizational structure; Community Patrol Officers program; precinct details; crisis intervention; reaction control training; investigatory skills; preventive patrol techniques. Individual students are assigned on a rotating basis to selected field training Sergeants who receive special training and extra compensation for this work. Three bimonthly field training evaluations are prepared by separate sergeants on each student and any below standard evaluation is channeled to the Chief of Patrol. The final evaluation and certification as a police officer takes place at the end of the probationary period. Version 2: Training is conducted as described in Version 1, with the following modifications: training takes place in the precincts rather than division offices, and more emphasis is given to community-oriented policing. Version 3: Upon graduating from the Police Academy, probationary police officers are assigned to Precinct Field Training Units. Under the direction of a training supervisor, they are shown the manner in which to respond to serious emergencies, crimes in progress, tactical confrontations, and crowd control. The probationary police officers are also thoroughly briefed and re-instructed on Department policies and procedures. Three bimonthly field training evaluations are prepared by training supervisors on each student. The final evaluation and certification as a police officer takes place at the end of the probationary period. Version 4 or 5: Upon graduating from the Police Academy, probationary police officers are assigned to Precinct Field Training Units. Under the direction of a field training sergeant and other ranking officers with whom the probationary officer completes foot patrols and radio motor patrol tours, they are shown the manner in which to respond to serious emergencies, crimes in progress, tactical confrontations, and crowd control. The probationary police officers are also thoroughly briefed and re-instructed on Department policies and procedures. Monthly field training evaluations are prepared by training supervisors on each student. The final evaluation (by the field training sergeant) and certification as a police officer takes place at the end of the probationary period.
Credit recommendation:
Version 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours as an Internship in Criminal Justice (6/88) (3/93 revalidation) (11/94 revalidation) (10/99 revalidation). *NOTE: An earlier version of this learning experience was recommended for credit from December 1973 through June 1981 under the title Internship in Criminal Justice. The credit recommendation was: in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours as an Internship in Criminal Justice. Please refer to that exhibit for further information. Please note that there are nearly 6 years between the two versions of this learning experience when credit recommendations did not apply.
Location:
Police Academy, 235 East 20th St., New York, NY.
Length:
360 hours (9 weeks).
Dates:
December 1973 - June 1981.*
Objectives:
To provide field experience as part of the Student Officer Training Program.
Instruction:
Structured field experience during which the student officer is introduced to the practical application of police theory and technique. Criminal justice procedures; precinct organizational structure (neighborhood police teams and functional management); crisis intervention; community relations activities; reaction control training; investigatory skills; preventive patrol techniques. Individual students are assigned on a rotating basis to selected field training officers who receive special training and extra compensation for their role. The training officers supervise the field experience and evaluate the performance of the students three times during the internship. The final evaluation and certification as a  police officer takes place at the end of the probationary year.
Credit recommendation:
In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours as an Internship in Criminal Justice (8/74). *NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course continues under the exhibit titled Field Training Program. Please note that there are nearly 6 years between the two versions of this learning experience when credit did not apply.
Location:
Police Academy, 235 East 20th St., New York, NY.
Length:
Version 1: 62 hours. Version 2 or 3: 63 hours (11 weeks).
Dates:
Version 1: December 1973 - May 1980. Version 2: June 1980 - December 1990. Version 3: January 1991 - December 1999.*
Objectives:
Version 1 or 2: To provide the student with a basic introductory course in law with emphasis on the development of legal principles and concepts having application to law enforcement. Version 3: Identify and describe legal principles and concepts applicable to law enforcement.
Instruction:
Version 1 or 2:   The nature of law in contemporary society; study of the U.S. Constitution with emphasis on the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment; constitutional rights of the accused; the police officer and the judicial process; application of legal concepts (probable cause, stop and frisk); court testimony. Version 3: The nature of law in contemporary society; study of the U.S. Constitution with emphasis on the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment; constitutional rights of the accused; the police officer and the judicial process; application of legal concepts (probable cause, stop and frisk); court testimony; the progression of the use of force.
Credit recommendation:
Version 1:  In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Criminology, Government, Police Science, or Political Science (8/74). Version 2 or 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Government, Police Science, or Political Science (4/85 revalidation) (1/91 revalidation) (5/96 revalidation). *NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course's instructional content continues in the course exhibit titled Law.
Formerly:
offered as two components
Location:
Police Academy, 235 East 20th St., New York, NY.
Length:
Version 1: 180 hours. Version 2: 90 hours (12 weeks). Version 3: 69 hours (9 weeks). Version 4: 79.5 hours (26 weeks).
Dates:
Version 1: December 1973 - August 1979. Version 2: September 1979 - December 1990. Version 3: January 1991 - December 1993. Version 4: January 1994 - December 1999.*
Objectives:

Version 1 or 2: To provide the student with an introduction to law enforcement and its role within society with specific reference to the function of the patrol officer; to provide the student with an understanding of what is expected of the urban police officer; to enable the recruit to analyze and work within the guidelines of the New York City Police departmental structure and policy, and the individual member's functions; to familiarize the recruit with the purposes and operation of the New York City Police patrol, and the skills, techniques, resources, and statutes with which the police officer must be conversant. Version 3 or 4: Describe the function of law enforcement in society and its implications for the role of the police officer; define the role of the urban police officer; identify and describe the major features of the New York City Police Department's structure and policies; describe the purpose and operation of a New York City Police patrol function; describe the skills, resources, and statutes that are fundamental to a police officer's work.

Instruction:
Version 1: Role of law enforcement and the individual police officer's participation; departmental structure, policy, and rationale of each; individual member's internal and external relationships and functions; purposes and operations of police patrol; skills, techniques, resources and statutes with which the police office must be familiar. Version 2 or 3: Role of law enforcement and the individual police officer's participation; departmental structure, policy, and rationale of each; individual member's internal and external relationships and functions; purposes and operations of police patrol; skills, techniques, resources, and statutes with which the officer must be familiar; policies and practices of the New York City Police Department; organization and rank order; sick and excusal procedures; discipline; patrol: organization, function, conditions; report writing; police emergencies; communications; motor vehicle and traffic regulations; summons procedures; Environmental Control Board summons; arrest procedures; custody of children; policies concerning prisoners; police tactics; and fingerprinting. Version 4: Role of law enforcement and the individual police officer's participation; departmental structure, policy, and rationale of each; individual member's internal and external relationships and functions; purposes and operations of police patrol; skills, techniques, resources, and statutes with which the officer must be familiar; policies and practices of the New York City Police Department; organization and rank order; sick and excusal procedures; discipline; patrol: organization, function, conditions; report writing; police emergencies; communications; motor vehicle and traffic regulations; summons procedures; Environmental Control Board summons; arrest procedures; custody of children; policies concerning prisoners; police tactics; and fingerprinting;  community policing; juveniles.
Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Criminal Justice and 4 semester hours as an elective in Criminal Justice(8/74). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Criminal Justice (4/85 revalidation). Version 3 or 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Police Science (1/91 revalidation) (5/96 revalidation). *NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course's instructional content continues in the course exhibit titled Police Science.

Location:
Police Academy, 235 East 20th St., New York, NY.
Length:
Version 1: 63 hours. Version 2, 3, 4 or 5: 50 hours.
Dates:
Version 1: December 1973 - December 1979. Version 2: January 1980 - December 1990. Version 3: January 1991 - May 1992. Version 4: June 1992 - February 1994. Version 5: March 1994 - May 1995.*
Objectives:
Version 1: To provide the student with knowledge of human behavior that he/she can anticipate upon becoming a police officer. Version 2: To provide the recruit with the theoretical and applied social science material that will enable him/her to interact with people of various backgrounds. Version 3, 4 or 5: Describe the basic principles of social psychology that underlie guidelines for appropriate police officer behavior in dealing with different ethnic groups, emotionally or mentally disturbed individuals, domestic disputes, and various types of criminal behavior.
Instruction:
Version 1: Personality; crisis intervention; conflict management; interpersonal interaction; small group dynamics; adolescent behavior; communications theory; transactional analysis. Version 2: Personality development: socialization, attitudes, perception; myths; police cynicism; institutions and secrecy; stress; understanding human behavior; crisis intervention; death as a crisis; victimology; police intervention; child abuse; spouse abuse; juvenile delinquency; youths and adolescents; homicide/assault; individual disputes; crowd behavior. Version 3:  Personality development: socialization, attitudes, perception; myths; police cynicism; institutions and secrecy; stress; understanding human behavior; crisis intervention; death as a crisis; victimology; police intervention; child abuse; spouse abuse; juvenile delinquency; youths and adolescents; homicide/assault; individual disputes; crowd behavior; bias/prejudice, suicide, and non-custody emotionally disturbed persons. Version 4: Personality development: socialization, attitudes, perception; myths; police cynicism; institutions and secrecy; stress; understanding human behavior; crisis intervention; death as a crisis; victimology; police intervention; child abuse; spouse abuse; juvenile delinquency; youths and adolescents; homicide/assault; individual disputes; crowd behavior; bias/prejudice, suicide, and non-custody emotionally disturbed persons; community policing; cultural awareness, including an overview of the history of immigration to New York City, the process of assimilation, contributions of various ethnic groups. Version 5: Personality development: socialization, attitudes, perception; myths; police cynicism; institutions and secrecy; stress; understanding human behavior; crisis intervention; death as a crisis; victimology; police intervention; child abuse; spouse abuse; juvenile delinquency; youths and adolescents; individual disputes; crowd behavior; bias/prejudice, suicide; non-custody emotionally disturbed persons; community policing; cultural awareness, including an overview of the history of immigration to New York City, the process of assimilation, contributions of various ethnic groups; member of the service involved in domestic situations.
Credit recommendation:
Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Behavioral Sciences, Criminal Justice, Social Science, or Social Work (8/74). Version 2, 3, 4 or 5: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Behavioral Sciences, Criminal Justice, Applied Social Science, Applied Sociology, or Social Work (4/85 revalidation) (1/91 revalidation). *NOTE: The credit recommendation for this course's instructional content continues in the course exhibit titled Selected Topics in Behavioral Science for Police Officers.
Location:
Police Academy, 235 East 20th St., New York, NY.
Length:
146 hours (26 weeks).
Dates:
January 2000 - June 2003.*
Objectives:
Identify the more commonly invoked criminal statutes and recognize their applications to specific situations; Identify and describe legal principles and concepts applicable to law enforcement.
Instruction:
Comprehensive analysis of criminal law and procedures; methods of interpretation of criminal statutes; statutory definitions of crime; study of case law related to criminal statutes and applications to specific situations (emphasis is on the underlying framework of criminal law); the nature of law in contemporary society; study of the U.S. Constitution with emphasis on the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment; constitutional rights of the accused; the police officer and the judicial process; application of legal concepts (probable cause, stop and frisk); court testimony; the progression of the use of force.
Credit recommendation:
In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours in Criminal Justice (5/01 revalidation). *NOTE: The content covered in this course was recommended for credit as two separate courses from December 1973 to December 1999. Please refer to the former individual course titles for further information.

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