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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Survey Courses - Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 213.5 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:
Version 1: August 2001 - July 2006. Version 2: August 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Talmudic material; discuss the underlying principles to derive halachic conclusions; follow the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation leading to halachic resolutions; develop a comparative study of the various opinions raised.

Instruction:

Version 1: The fourth and fifth chapters of Tractate Bava Basra focuses on the sale of property and inclusions in these sales. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim, and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce the crux of these issues. Topics include: Inclusions and exclusions in the sale of a house; cases where the boundaries are not clearly marked; dividing an inheritance; the sale of a courtyard; the sale of a city; inclusions in the sale of a ship; anecdotal stories about the seas; the writing of contracts. NOTE: This tractate is studied by all students in a given trimester. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study depends upon what level the student is in. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: First Level Students (TS151): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion; or Second Level Students and beyond (TS351): In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (9/02). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title. Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/08 revalidation). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title.

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 213.5 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:

Version 1: February 2002 - January 2007.  Version 2: February 2007 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Talmudic material; discuss the underlying principles to derive halachic conclusions; follow the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation leading to halachic resolutions; develop a comparative study of the various opinions raised.

Instruction:

Version 1: The first and sixth chapters of Tractate Bava Basra focuses on analysis of sales and the assumed stipulations in those sales and civil laws concerning zoning and permitted use of a property. Studentsprepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim, and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce the crux of these issues.Topics include: purchase of seeds that fail to germinate; losses incurred from sales; wine which spoils; assumed contractual stipulations; rights of passage; zoning laws; causing pain to living things; public education; competition; firing a teacher. NOTE: This tractate is studied by all students in a given trimester. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study depends upon what level the student is in. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: First Level Students (TS152): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion; or Second Level Students and beyond (TS352): In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (9/02). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title. Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/08 revalidation). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title.

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 213.5 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:
Version 1: August 2002 - July 2007. Version 2: August 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Talmudic material; discuss the underlying principles to derive halachic conclusions; follow the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation leading to halachic resolutions; develop a comparative study of the various opinions raised.

Instruction:

Version 1: The third and fourth chapters of Tractate Bava Kammah focuses on property damages done by negligence and the damage done by one's chattel. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim, and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce the crux of these issues. Topics  include: application of the Talmudic rule of following the majority; defining the parameters of damages caused by a pit; liability for workplace injuries; laws pertaining to court appointed guardians; laws regarding an animal that damages. NOTE: This tractate is studied by all students in a given trimester. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study depends upon what level the student is in. Version 2:Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one level credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: First Level Students (TS161): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion; or Second Level Students and beyond (TS361): In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (4/04). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title. Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/09 revalidation). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title.

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 213.5 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:
Version 1: February 2003 - January 2007. Version 2: February 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Talmudic material; discuss the underlying principles to derive halachic conclusions; follow the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation leading to halachic resolutions; develop a comparative study of the various opinions raised.

Instruction:

Version 1: The eighth and second chapters of Tractate Bava Kammah focuses on various forms of personal injury and consequential property damage. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim, and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce the crux of these issues. Topics include: Biblical concept of an eye for an eye; workers compensation; laws of acquiring property; injuring one's self deliberately; the permissibility of damaging with owner's consent; Tz'roros; using an object without owner's permission and without damaging object; animal inflicting damage; animal classifications of Tam and Muad. NOTE: This tractate is studied by all students in a given trimester. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study depends upon what level the student is in. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: First Level Students (TS162): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion; or Second Level Students and beyond (TS362): In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (4/04). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title. Version 2: In the lower divsion baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/09 revaldation). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title.

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 213.5 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:
Version 1: September 2003 - January 2007. Version 2: February 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Talmudic material; discuss the underlying principles to derive halachic conclusions; follow the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation leading to halachic resolutions; develop a comparative study of the various opinions raised.

Instruction:

Version 1: The fourth chapter of Tractate Gittin focuses on divorce by proxy and ways to acquire and free slaves. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim, and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors.The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce the crux of these issues. Topics include: overview of the laws of proxy; process of appointing a proxy; understanding the authority of a proxy in the divorce process; outline of the laws of taking an oath in court; discussion of the legal ramifications of the sabbatical and jubilee years; the concept of collateral in Talmudic law. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (8/04). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title. Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/09 revalidation). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title.

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 213.5 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:
Version 1: February 2004 - January 2007. Version 2: February 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Talmudic material; discuss the underlying principles to derive halachic conclusions; follow the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation leading to halachic resolutions; and develop a comparative study of the various opinions raised.

Instruction:

Version 1: The fourth and ninth chapters of Tractate Gittin focuses on the laws of slaves and the allowable exclusions in a divorce contract. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim, and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce the crux of these issues. Topics include: various laws of half-slaves; different fines imposed upon slave owners; the requirement to redeem the kidnapped persons; allowable grounds for divorce; overview of the get giving procedure; overview and discussion regarding the concept of exclusions in the get, i.e., excluding one individual, various conditions, etc. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (8/04). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title. Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/09 revalidation). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title.

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 213.5 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:

Version 1: August 1999 - July 2006. Version 2: August 2006 - Present.

Objectives:

Version1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Talmudic material; discuss the underlying principles to derive halachic conclusions; follow the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation leading to halachic resolutions; develop a comparative study of the various opinions raised.

Instruction:

Version 1: The first half of the second chapter of Tractate Kiddushin focuses on the various legal aspects of marriage, including the use of agents and conditional marriages. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim, and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce the crux of these issues. Topics include: getting married using an agent; redivision of assets using a court appointed trustee; evaluation of properties by the courts; misappropriation of property by a guardian; jurisdiction of a father over his daughter; sale of a Jewish maidservant; return of monies insufficient to aggregate to one marriage agreement; the sale of loans of indebtedness; the writing of legal documents; the validity of unexpressed intentions; kiddushin where cohabitation is illegal. NOTE: This tractate is studied by all students in a given trimester. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study depends upon what level the student is in. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: First Level Students (TS131): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion; or Second Level Students and beyond (TS331): In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (7/00). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title. Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06 revalidation). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title.

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 213.5 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:
Version 1: August 1999 - July 2006. Version 2: August 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Talmudic material; discuss the underlying principles to derive halachic conclusions; follow the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation leading to halachic resolutions; develop a comparative study of the various opinions raised.

Instruction:

Version 1: The second half of the second chapter and the third chapter of Tractate Kiddushin focuses on the various legal aspects of marriage, including the use of sanctified property for getting married, and the rights of ownership of sanctified property. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim, and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce the crux of these issues. Topics covered include: Misappropriation of hekdesh property; redemption of maaser sheni; ownership of maaser sheni; guidelines on what one may purchase with maaser sheni funds; items which may be used to effect kiddushin; deviations of certain forbidden items; inheriting tithes; placing a monetary value on the benefit of gratitude; rescinding thoughts; consecration of fields before the Jubilee year. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: First Level Students (TS132) or Second Level Students and beyond (TS332): In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (7/00). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title. Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06 revalidation). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title.

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:
97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 213.5 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:
September 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Talmudic material; discuss the underlying principles to derive halachic conclusions; follow the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation leading to halachic resolutions; develop a comparative study of the various opinions raised.

Instruction:

The first chapter of Tractate Makkos discusses the laws of Zomemim Witnesses, who are guilty of a specific kind of false testimony and are punished with the very consequences they had planned to inflict upon their victims - reciprocal punishment; extensive study of the various disqualifications that may render witnesses or their testimony invalid. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim, and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce the crux of these issues.

Credit recommendation:
In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title.
Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:
97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 213.5 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:
February 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon succeessful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Talmudic material; discuss the underlying principles to derive halachic conclusions; follow the dynamics of Talmudic argumentation leading to halachic resolutions; develop a comparative study of the various opinions raised.

Instruction:

The second chapter of Tractate Makkos focuses on the laws of of exile for one who kills another person inadvertently and delineation of levels of unintentional killing. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim, and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce the crux of these issues.

Credit recommendation:
In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Survey course of the same title, and the two Intensive Study courses of the same title.

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