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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Intensive Study Courses - Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 361 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:
Version 1: August 2001 - July 2006. Version 2: August 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Aramaic Talmudic material; conceptualize and articulate the reasoning behind the various legal citations and opinions, honing and applying analytical skills to Talmudic explication, argumentation, and resolution as the basis for halochot analysis and final decision making; discuss classical Talmudic topical concepts and document a grasp of the technical as well as theoretical aspects of the Talmudic portions studied.

Instruction:

Version 1: The third chapter Tractate Bava Basra lays down the laws of acquisition of properties, including the time period necessary for the acquisition of property through usage, and the proof necessary for such an acquisition. The student prepares the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides the students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce and elucidate the crux of these issues. Topics include: conceptual differences between movable and immovable property; time period of three years needed for acquisition; continuity needed for the three year period; concept of reliability of a Migu; retracting testimony; contradictory witnesses. NOTE: This tractate is studied by all students in a given semester. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study depends upon what level the student is in. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: First Level Students (TI251): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion; or Second Level Students and beyond (TI451): In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (9/02). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Intensive Study course of the same title, and the two Survey courses of the same title. Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/08 revalidation).

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 361 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:
Version 1: February 2002 - January 2007. Version 2: February 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Aramaic Talmudic material; conceptualize and articulate the reasoning behind the various legal citations and opinions, honing and applying analytical skills to Talmudic explication, argumentation, and resolution as the basis for halochot analysis and final decision making; discuss classical Talmudic topical concepts and document a grasp of the technical as well as theoretical aspects of the Talmudic portions studied.

Instruction:

Version 1: Continuation of the third chapter of Tractate Bava Basra discussing the laws of properties and their acquisitions and the laws of partnerships. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce and elucidate the crux of these issues. Topics include: establishment of the lineage of a father and its continuity through the children; reliability; sing fruits of the land of orphans; claimants' requirements to prove their case; walls between neighbors; paying for the wall; resolving monetary disputes; liens taken to ensure payment. NOTE: This tractate is studied by all students in a given semester. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study depends upon what level the student is in. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: First Level Students (TI252): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion; or Second Level Students and beyond (TI452): In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (9/02)  NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Intensive Study course of the same title, and the two Survey courses of the same title. Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/08 revalidation). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Intensive Study course of the same title, and the two Survey courses of the same title

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:
97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 361 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:
Version 1: August 2002 - July 2006. Version 2: August 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Aramaic Talmudic material; conceptualize and articulate the reasoning behind the various legal citations and opinions, honing and applying analytical skills to Talmudic explication, argumentation, and resolution as the basis for halochot analysis and final decision making; discuss classical Talmudic topical concepts and document a grasp of the technical as well as theoretical aspects of the Talmudic portions studied.

Instruction:

Version 1: The first chapter of the Tractate Bava Kammah discusses the laws of damages, including the sources for requirement of payments, and various applications and damages. Studentsprepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce and elucidate the crux of these issues. Topics include: the obligation to pay for damages done to the property of others; concept that a punishment can only be derived directly from the biblical text; false witnesses; personal objects doing damage in the public domain; refuse causing damage. NOTE: This tractate is studied by all students in a given semester. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study depends upon what level the student is in. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: First Level Students (TI261): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion; or Second Level Students and beyond (TI461):In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (4/04). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Intensive Study course of the same title, and the two Survey courses of the same title. Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/09 revalidation).

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 361 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:
Version 1: February 2003 - January 2007. Version 2: February 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Aramaic Talmudic material; conceptualize and articulate the reasoning behind the various legal citations and opinions, honing and applying analytical skills to Talmudic explication, argumentation, and resolution as the basis for halochot analysis and final decision making; discuss classical Talmudic topical concepts and document a grasp of the technical as well as theoretical aspects of the Talmudic portions studied.

Instruction:

Version 1: The first chapter of the Tractate Bava Kammah discusses the laws of damages, including the sources for requirement of payments, and various applications and damages. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides the students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce and elucidate the crux of these issues. Topics include: liens; laws of a watchman's obligations; payment for stolen property by the thief; fines levied against a thief; relinquishing ownership rights to an object. NOTE: This tractate is studied by all students in a given semester. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study depends upon what level the student is in. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: First Level Students (TI262): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion; or Second Level Students and beyond (TI462): In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (4/04). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Intensive Study course of the same title, and the two Survey courses of the same title. Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/09 revalidation).

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:
97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 361 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:
September 2003 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Aramaic Talmudic material; conceptualize and articulate the reasoning behind the various legal citations and opinions, honing and applying analytical skills to Talmudic explication, argumentation, and resolution as the basis for halochot analysis and final decision making; discuss classical Talmudic topical concepts and document a grasp of the technical as well as theoretical aspects of the Talmudic portions studied.

Instruction:

The first chapter of the Tractate Gittin discusses the laws of divorce, including writing of the divorce contract, delivery of said contract validity of contracts written in foreign lands, number of witnesses needed, and type of witnesses required. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce and elucidate the crux of these issues. Topics include: overview of the writing of the divorce contract; delivery of said contract; discussion regarding validity of contracts written in foreign lands; number of witnesses needed; type of witnesses required; discussion of whether the proxy can act as a witness; in depth analysis of the acceptance of the husband's argument about the validity of the divorce contract.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (8/04) (12/09). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Intensive Study course of the same title, and the two Survey courses of the same title.

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:
97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 361 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:
February 2004 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Aramaic Talmudic material; conceptualize and articulate the reasoning behind the various legal citations and opinions, honing and applying analytical skills to Talmudic explication, argumentation, and resolution as the basis for halochot analysis and final decision making; discuss classical Talmudic topical concepts and document a grasp of the technical as well as theoretical aspects of the Talmudic portions studied.

Instruction:

The first chapter of the Tractate Gittin involves the laws of divorce and the eighth chapter involves the laws of the get-giving process, including types of parchment necessary for the get, who may deliver the get, the ability of one's estate to acquire something, conditions in the get, and the expiration of a get. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce and elucidate the crux of these issues. Topics covered include: the type of parchment necessary for the get; analysis of who may deliver the get; examination of the ability of one's estate to acquire something; laws of conditions in the get; discussion regarding the lifespan of a get; in depth analysis of the handover of the get; and acceptable reasons for divorce.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (8/04) (12/09). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Intensive Study course of the same title, and the two Survey courses of the same title.

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 361 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:
Version 1: August 1999 - July 2006. Version 2: August 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Aramaic Talmudic material; conceptualize and articulate the reasoning behind the various legal citations and opinions, honing and applying analytical skills to Talmudic explication, argumentation, and resolution as the basis for halochot analysis and final decision making; discuss classical Talmudic topical concepts and document a grasp of the technical as well as theoretical aspects of the Talmudic portions studied.

Instruction:

Version 1: The first half of the first chapter of the Tractate Kiddushin discusses the laws of getting married, including the various methods of the ceremonial acquisition and sources for many of the aspects of the marriage process. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce and elucidate the crux of these issues. Topics include: methods used in the marriage procedure; analysis of the money used; rights of a father in his daughter's marriage; the language used in a marriage ceremony; using a loan to marry; marriage using the principle of a guarantor; evaluating items used for marriage; comparison of concepts used in marriage and divorce. NOTE: This tractate is studied by all students in a given semester. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study depends upon what level the student is in. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: First Level Students (TI231): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion; or Second Level Students and beyond (TI431):In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (7/00). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Intensive Study course of the same title, and the two Survey courses of the same title. Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06 revalidation).

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 361 hours of supervised peer study.

Dates:
Version 1: August 1999 - July 2006. Version 2: August 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Aramaic Talmudic material; conceptualize and articulate the reasoning behind the various legal citations and opinions, honing and applying analytical skills to Talmudic explication, argumentation, and resolution as the basis for halochot analysis and final decision making; discuss classical Talmudic topical concepts and document a grasp of the technical as well as theoretical aspects of the Talmudic portions studied.

Instruction:

Version 1: The end of the first chapter of the Tractate Kiddushin continues the discussion of marriage, including the monies used for the process, laws of acquisition, parental responsibilities toward children, and laws of acquisition of objects. Students prepare the applicable Talmudic texts as well as the major halachic opinions of the rishonim and acharonim and the opinions of various other commentaries and decisors. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce and elucidate the crux of these issues. Topics include: permissibility of betrothed to partake in husband's tithes; evaluation of currency; methods of acquisition of merchandise; gifts to slaves; Jewish maidservants; responsibilities of a father to his son; honoring one's parents; the prohibition to denigrate one's parents. NOTE: This tractate is studied by all students in a given semester. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study depends upon what level the student is in. Version 2: Topics are the same as the earlier version. Only one credit recommendation level is now in effect.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: First Level Students (TI232): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion; or Second Level Students and beyond (TI432): In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (7/00). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Intensive Study course of the same title, and the two Survey courses of the same title. Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06 revalidation).

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:
97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 361 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:
September 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Aramaic Talmudic material; conceptualize and articulate the reasoning behind the various legal citations and opinions, honing and applying analytical skills to Talmudic explication, argumentation, and resolution as the basis for halochot analysis and final decision making; discuss classical Talmudic topical concepts and document a grasp of the technical as well as theoretical aspects of the Talmudic portions studied.

Instruction:

The first chapter of the Tractate Makkos discusses the laws of Zomemim witnesses, who are guilty of a specific kind of false testimony and are punished with the very same consequence they had planned to inflict upon their victims - reciprocal punishment; extensive study of the various disqualifications that may render witnesses or testimony invalid. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce and elucidate the crux of these issues. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Intensive Study course of the same title, and the two Survey courses of the same title.

Location:
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland, 91 West Carlton Road, Suffern, New York.
Length:
97 hours (19 weeks); in addition, 361 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:
February 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: prepare a textual, linguistic, and legal analysis of the applicable Aramaic Talmudic material; conceptualize and articulate the reasoning behind the various legal citations and opinions, honing and applying analytical skills to Talmudic explication, argumentation, and resolution as the basis for halochot analysis and final decision making; discuss classical Talmudic topical concepts and document a grasp of the technical as well as theoretical aspects of the Talmudic portions studied.

Instruction:

The second chapter of the Tractate Makkos discusses the laws of exile for one who kills another person inadvertently and delineation of levels of unintentional killing. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised and assists them to deduce and elucidate the crux of these issues.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06). NOTE: Credit can be awarded for this course, the other Intensive Study course of the same title, and the two Survey courses of the same title.

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