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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Jewish Law - Genesis University

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
January 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of blessings and its legal ramifications; define the legal- Halachic terminology pertaining to the laws of blessings; identify and examine governing principles and theory; and apply legal reasoning to practical issues.

Instruction:

This is an advanced study of the laws of blessings on food items using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Emphasis is placed on identifying and examining governing principles and theory to develop the skills and ability to apply legal reasoning to practical applications and scenarios. Major topics include: general principles of blessings; formal structures of blessings; Biblical and Talmudic sources of blessings; reciting a blessing; blessings prior to eating; interruptions and blessings; primary and secondary foods.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/05) (5/10 revalidation) (5/15 revalidation).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
January 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of blessings and its legal ramifications; define the legal- Halachic terminology pertaining to the laws of blessings; identify and examine governing principles and theory; and apply legal reasoning to practical issues.

Instruction:

This is an advanced study of the laws of blessings using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Emphasis is placed on identifying and examining governing principles and theory and to develop the skills and ability to apply legal reasoning to practical applications and scenarios. Major topics include: the order of blessings; making blessings on behalf of others; invalid blessings; un-required blessings; blessings made in vain; blessings made after foods; principles of blessings; structure of blessings; Biblical and Talmudic sources of blessings.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
January 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe Biblical and Rabbinic ordinances applicable to food preparation and consumption; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic ordinances and effects on dietary laws; discuss and analyze the status of mixtures of permissable and impermissable foods; analyze scenarios dealing with contemporary situations, that deal with issues related to heat, steam, and soaking, as well as foods touching one other and vessels, as applied to kosher and non-kosher products.

Instruction:

This is a comprehensive survey of the Jewish Dietary Law that provides students with the knowledge of the Jewish dietary law. Major topics include: prohibited foods; Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions; mixing meat and milk; categories of nullification; and categories of taste. Emphasis is placed on practical contemporary issues.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
June 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: examine the dietary laws governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law and their legal ramifications; trace the laws to their biblical roots; identify Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions and rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary and practical issues.

Instruction:

This is a comprehensive survey of the Jewish Dietary Law that provides students with the knowledge of Jewish dietary laws. Major topics include: immersing new vessels and utensils; prepared cooked foods; prepared baked goods; insect infestation in vegetables; and dairy products. Emphasis is placed on practical contemporary issues.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06) (3/11 revalidation) (9/16 revalidation).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
June 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of the Festivals as found in the Code of Jewish Law; compare and contrast the laws of the Sabbath with those of the Festivals; define the legal- Halachic terminology pertaining to the laws discussed; trace the laws to their biblical roots; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary issues and scenarios.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the laws of the Festivals governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law. Emphasis is placed on differentiating the laws of the Festivals with those of the Sabbath and applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios, using contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Major topics include: analyzing prohibited labors; positive commandments relating to the Festivals; and preparations done for and on the Festivals.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06) (3/11 revalidation) (9/16 revalidation).

Location:

Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.

Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:

June 2005 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon succcessful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of the Festivals as found in the Code of Jewish Law; compare and contrast the laws of the Sabbath with those of the Festivals; define the legal Halachic terminology pertaining to the laws discussed; trace the laws to their biblical roots; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary issues and scenarios.  

Instruction:

This is an in–depth study of the laws of the Festivals governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law. Emphasis is placed on differentiating the laws of the Festivals with those of the Sabbath and  applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios, using contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Major topics include: analyzing prohibited labors; positive commandments relating to the Festivals; and preparations done for and on the Festivals.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06) (3/11 revalidation) (9/16 revalidation).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
January 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law and their legal ramifications; define the legal Halachic terminology pertaining to these laws; trace the laws to their biblical roots; identify Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions and rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary and practical issues.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law sections covering selected topics. Emphasis is placed on applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios, using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Major topics include: Kiddush, Havdalah, and Hadlokas Neiros, Muktza, Amirah L'Akum, Tircha, Hachono, Uvdin D'chol, and Molid.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/05) (5/10 revalidation) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Sabbath I, II, III, IV, and V are not duplicative or sequential and may be taken in any order.

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
January 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law regarding the study of selected labors that are forbidden on the Sabbath and their legal ramifications; define the legal-Halachic terminology pertaining to these laws; trace the laws to their biblical roots; identify Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions and rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary and practical issues.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law, beginning with a study of labors that are forbidden on the Sabbath. The course focuses on the labors involved in the food production process. Emphasis is placed on applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios, using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Major topics include: labors relating to plowing through kneading, including plowing; sowing; reaping; separating; grinding and kneading.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/05) (5/10 revalidation) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Sabbath I, II, III, IV, and V are not duplicative or sequential and may be taken in any order.

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
January 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law regarding the study of selected labors that are forbidden on the Sabbath and their legal ramifications; define the legal-Halachic terminology pertaining to these laws; trace the laws to their biblical roots; identify Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions and rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary and practical issues.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law, beginning the study of labors that are forbidden on the Sabbath. The course focuses on the labors involved in the production of animal hides and garments. Emphasis is placed on applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios, using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Major topics include: labors relating to writing; erasing; sewing and tearing; tying and untying objects; dyeing; shearing; cleaning or laundering.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/05) (5/10 revalidation) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Sabbath I, II, III, IV, and V are not duplicative or sequential and may be taken in any order.

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
January 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law regarding the study of selected labors that are forbidden on the Sabbath and their legal ramifications; define the legal Halachic terminology pertaining to these laws; trace the laws to their biblical roots; identify Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions; differentiate between Biblical and Rabbinic prohibitions and rulings; and apply legal reasoning to contemporary and practical issues.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the laws of the Sabbath governing issues found in the Code of Jewish Law, beginning with the study of labors forbidden on the Sabbath. The course focuses on the labors involved in the production of animal hides and issues dealing with construction. Emphasis is placed on applying legal theory to practical and contemporary situations and scenarios, using classic and contemporary texts, as well as journal articles and essays. Major topics include: trapping animals; slaughtering; building temporary and permanent structures; lighting and extinguishing flames.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/05) (5/10 revalidation) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Sabbath I, II, III, IV, and V are not duplicative or sequential and may be taken in any order.

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