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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Language Courses (Hebrew and Yiddish)

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
April 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

This course combines the objectives Advanced Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 301) and Advanced Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 302). Students will be able to: derive meaning from context without understanding every word of conversation; follow a longer presentation in Hebrew on a number of topics pertaining to different times and places; decipher nuances of language; initiate conversations in Hebrew and sustain them for a longer period of time; converse in Hebrew in a variety of everyday, school, work or social situations; read consistently with full understanding of simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the student has personal interest or knowledge; get the gist of longer paragraphs when expectations cued by the text are fulfilled as well as to comprehend most details of simple informative texts; read and interpret poetry; read between the lines to interpret nuances and big ideas; write an essay that analyzes a topic in depth; and meet most practical writing needs and limited social demands such as taking notes on familiar topics, respond in writing to personal questions and write simple letters, brief synopses.

Instruction:
Advanced Modern Hebrew (MHEB 303) is for students who completed Intermediate Modern Hebrew (MHEB 203) or students who have a relatively strong Hebrew proficiency. The primary objective of this course is to help learners improve their skills in Hebrew for the purpose of oral and written communication and reading comprehension.
Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Advanced Modern Hebrew (MHEB 303) duplicates courses Advanced Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 301) and Advanced Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 302).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
April 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: derive meaning from context without understanding every word of conversation; follow a presentation in Hebrew on a number of topics; initiate conversations in Hebrew and sustain them for a longer period of time; converse in Hebrew in a variety of everyday, school, work or social situations; read consistently with full understanding of simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the student has personal interest or knowledge; get the gist of longer paragraphs when expectations cued by the text are fulfilled as well as comprehending most details of simple informative texts; and meet most practical writing needs and limited social demands such as taking notes on familiar topics, respond in writing to personal questions and write simple letters, brief synopses.

Instruction:
Advanced Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 301) is designed for students who completed Intermediate Modern Hebrew or students who have a relatively strong Hebrew proficiency. The primary objective is to help learners improve their skills in Hebrew for the purpose of oral and written communication and reading comprehension.
Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). 

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
April 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: derive meaning from context without understanding every word of conversation; follow a longer presentation in Hebrew on a number of topics pertaining to different times and places; decipher nuances of language; initiate conversations in Hebrew and sustain them for a longer period of time; converse in Hebrew in a variety of everyday, school, work or social situations; read consistently with full understanding of simple connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs about which the student has personal interest or knowledge; get the gist of longer paragraphs when expectations cued by the text are fulfilled as well as comprehending most details of simple informative texts; read and interpret poetry; read between the lines to interpret nuances and big ideas; write an essay that analyzes a topic in depth; and meet most practical writing needs and limited social demands such as taking notes on familiar topics, respond in writing to personal questions and write simple letters, brief synopses.

Instruction:
Advanced Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 302) is designed for students who completed Advanced Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 301) or students who have a relatively strong Hebrew proficiency. The primary objective of this course is to help learners improve their skills in Hebrew for the purpose of oral and written communication and reading comprehension.
Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
April 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: fulfill the objectives for Elementary Yiddish (YID 103) and Intermediate Yiddish (YID 203), including responding to more complex scenarios; increase proficient reading skills reflecting comprehension, expanded vocabulary, and capacity to write responsively; increasing knowledge and skill of correct verb usage, tenses, and integration into writing; and demonstrating the capacity to read and comprehend more complex Yiddish writings.

Instruction:

This advanced course integrates the skills acquired by the student in elementary Yiddish and intermediate Yiddish, and extends the skills to advanced language proficiency. Major topics include: reading comprehension, discourse, writing and reading. Students are expected to demonstrate an advanced level of facility and comprehension of complicated texts and situations, and respond to them in a fluid discourse, reflecting skill and comfort.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours in Advanced Yiddish, or Germanic Languages (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
April 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

This course combines Elementary Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 151) and Elementary Biblical Hebrew II (HEB 152). Students will be able to: read biblical Hebrew; transliterate Hebrew words; translate selected Biblical passages; parse and find the lexical form of verbs; explain the basics of verbal forms; understand basic syntax of Hebrew; and understand basic morphology of Hebrew and analyze word formation.

Instruction:

The primary goals of the elementary level are to introduce the elementary grammar forms, the regular verbal forms, the most frequent vocabulary, word formations and their inflection, and the characteristic syntax and other basic features of the language. Topics may include: the Hebrew alphabet; writing - print and cursive; the vowel system (including vowel reduction); reading; the noun - gender and number, independent (personal) pronouns, demonstrative pronouns; interrogative pronouns, nominal sentence, the syntactic order "noun-adjective", the definite article (including before gutturals), the conjunction vav, some prepositions; construct case; pronominal suffixes; verb - overview; applying the verb pattern to selected Binyanim (stems); marker of the direct object; Yiqtol patterns of the strong verb active participle; forms of the imperative in the strong verb; and pronominal suffixes with verbs.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 8 semester hours in Biblical or Classical Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Elementary Biblical Hebrew (HEB 153) is a combination of Elementary Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 151) and Elementary Biblical Hebrew II (HEB 152).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
April 2010- Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: read biblical Hebrew (alphabet, vowels, pronunciation); transliterate Hebrew words; parse and find the lexical form of verbs; explain the basics of verbal forms (by roots, pronouns, gender, number, verbal stems, tenses, verbal forms, such as infinitive, participle); understand basic syntax of Hebrew; understand basic morphology of Hebrew and analyze word formation; and read and translate selected biblical passages.

Instruction:

The primary goal of Elementary Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 151) is to introduce the elementary grammar forms, the regular verbal forms, the most frequent vocabulary, word formations and their inflection, and the characteristic syntax and other basic features of the language. Topics may include: the Hebrew alphabet; writing - print and cursive; the vowel system (including vowel reduction); reading; the noun - gender and number; independent (personal) pronouns; demonstrative pronouns; interrogative pronouns; nominal sentence; the syntactic order; noun-adjective; the definite article; the conjunction vav; some prepositions; construct case; pronominal suffixes; verb - overview; qatal pattern (the strong verb) of Pa'al (Qal); and the direct object marker.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Biblical or Classical Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
April 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

In addition to the objectives for Elementary Biblical Hebrew I (HEB 151), students will be able to: parse and find the lexical form of more complex verbs; explain the verbal forms (by roots, pronouns, gender, number, verbal stems, tenses, verbal forms, such as infinitive, participle); extend the knowledge of syntax of biblical Hebrew; and analyze word formation.

Instruction:

Students further their knowledge of biblical Hebrew. The primary goal of the elementary level II is to build on the materials introduced in elementary level I and add more complex aspects of biblical Hebrew. Topics may include: mastering the (verb) Qatal pattern (the strong verb) in the Binyanim (stems); Yiqtol patterns of the strong verb active participle; forms of the imperative in the strong verb; and pronominal suffixes with verbs (accusative pronouns).

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Biblical or Classical Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
April 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand short, memorized phrases and some sentence length utterances in face to face conversations with native speakers and each other; comprehend basic questions, statements and high frequency commands found in daily behavior involving family, school, leisure time activities; engage in basic communicative exchanges, mainly through recombination or expansion of learned material; describe daily actions, appearances from an established word bank; respond within conversations in full sentences that demonstrate proper syntactical usage with nouns and verbs- number and gender agreement; ask questions, cope with simple survival situations such as ordering a basic meal, asking for directions, or buying clothes; recognize Hebrew letters in both print and script; read familiar sight words effortlessly; decode unfamiliar words and phrases using root and contextual clues; begin to recognize basic grammatical structures when vocabulary is known or supplied and even extract meaning from a string of simple connected sentences; write simple, fixed expressions and limited memorized materials and some recombination thereof; write several sentences about themselves and their personal world; answer questions from oral and written prompts; write names, numbers, and other simple autobiographical information, as well as some short phrases and simple lists; recombine memorized materials into simple statements, short descriptive sentences or basic questions.

Instruction:

Elementary Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 101) introduces English-speaking students to Modern Hebrew. The primary objective of this course is to help learners acquire some basic skills in Hebrew for the purposes of oral and written communication and reading comprehension.  Major topics include: communicative subjects: introducing people and oneself; greetings; finding information about people and places; professions; leisure time activities; description of people and places; counting and food; linguistic subjects: the Hebrew Alphabet; nouns: number and gender features; pronouns: singular and plural; question words (who, what, where, how, when);  demonstrative pronouns: singular and plural; prepositions, particles and suffixes: from, of, for, and, the, at/in, to, with; present tense verb form: singular and plural; definite article; expression of possession; concept of root and root classification; noun-adjective agreement; numbers.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
April 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand simple sentences which consist of recombination of learned elements that involve school, restaurant, home, time, and simple directions in face to face conversations with their teacher, native speakers and each other; understand more complex questions; understand the essence of simple face to face conversations and instructions given by a sympathetic speaker; respond to questions in more complete sentences; engage in conversations involving greetings, likes and dislikes, obtain information regarding feelings, food and get directions; express themselves more confidently regarding themselves and family; leave a voice message in Hebrew; ask and answer questions, initiate and respond to simple statements, and maintain face to face conversations; understand main ideas and or some facts from the simplest connected texts dealing with basic personal and social needs; read consistently with increased understanding simple, connected texts dealing with a variety of basic and social needs; identify basic structures and vocabulary in longer passages and to get the gist of the text by ignoring unfamiliar material; write connected sentences in small paragraphs; and meet limited practical writing needs such as writing short notes, letters, and telephone messages.

Instruction:

Elementary Modern Hebrew II (MHEB 102) is for students who completed Elementary Modern Hebrew I (MHEB 101) or those who are already familiar with the basic structures of the Hebrew language and have acquired the basic reading, listening, speaking and writing skills. The course objectives are to continue developing skills, with an emphasis on active use of the language in its cultural context. Major topics include: communicative subjects: polite expressions; directions; food, cooking, and diet; messages; daily schedule; time; shopping; counting and numbers; the neighborhood; leisure activities; seasons and weather; health and body parts; linguistic subjects: present and past tense of regular and irregular verbs; adverbs of quantity, degree, time and intensity; noun and noun phrases; derived adjectives; modal verbs; expressions of time and dates; and impersonal expressions.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Modern Hebrew (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

Location:
Genesis University, Miami, FL; authorized instructional sites, or approved proctor sites.
Length:

Classroom-based or distance learning course administered through Genesis University. 

Dates:
April 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate fluency (unassisted) in pronunciation of vocalized and non-vocalized words; use basic grammar rules, sentence structure; analyze / identify /parse root words and sentences; use articles, verb tenses, prefixes and suffixes correctly; read elementary passages of basic texts - conversational, instructional; comprehend simple passages taken from various sources, including elementary and popular texts, some reflecting history and culture of language; write basic autobiographical information in short sentences; respond to basic questions using complete sentences; and translate from Yiddish to English, and the reverse.

Instruction:

Elementary Yiddish I (YID 103) focuses on practical language skills and self-expression, and the ability to communicate and understand Yiddish. Content includes: evaluating pronunciation, basic grammar skills, orthography, and simple writing skills, as well as written or oral response to aural selection.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 8 semester hours in Yiddish, or Germanic Languages (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

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