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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Talmudic Studies - Center for Academic and Religious Excellence

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Proficiency examination administered at the Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.) testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Length:

Varies.

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the examination, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: explain why Ethics of the Fathers is the path to the World to Come; trace the transmission of Jewish law and tradition through the generations from Moses until Rabbi Judah the Prince; internalize the proper conduct and self-discipline taught in Ethics of the Fathers; discuss the teaching of the sages vis-à-vis human behavior and thought and the relationship of an individual to his society; and discuss human behavior and thought vis-à-vis man’s relationship with G-d.

Instruction:

The discourse and analysis of this tractate of the Talmud (Ethics of the Fathers) deals with the moral, ethical, and practical teachings of the Sages and how they impact on every aspect of one’s personal, communal, and Jewish life. Topics include: how to serve G-d; submission to the authority of Torah leaders; friendship – positive and harmful; the three pillars of truth, justice, and peace; the responsibility of communal leadership; the proper path versus the evil path; and the importance of Torah study.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Classical, Judaic Studies, Religious Studies, or Philosophy (6/15).

Location:

Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.), Brooklyn, NY

Length:

Proficiency examination program administered at the CARE testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Dates:

September 2016 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful passing of the examinations, students will demonstrate proficiency as follows: recognize the fundamental importance of Torah study, including the importance of interactive study, and  the need to remember what one learns;  identify the activities that have a destructive effect on a person’s life in this world and the next, and the various “safeguards” that can help people stay on the right path; identify the various gifts and special status given by G-d to human beings, and the need to value every person; discuss how to interact and maintain good relations with others; identify the pairs of things that cannot exist without each other; and delineate the true definitions of wisdom, strength, wealth, and honor.

Instruction:

To prepare for this exam, students study the following topics: Akavya ben Mahalalel’s requirements to distance one from sin; the importance of Torah Study, discussion, and thought in Jewish life; the prohibition of using Torah study for personal gain; the knowledge that although everything is foreseen in advance, free will is given; Rabbi Levitas’s emphasis on humility; the requirement to reside in a place of Torah even at the cost of exile; Rabbi Elazar HaKappar’s analysis of the progression of life, death, and judgment that every person must undergo.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Classical, Judaic Studies, Religious Studies, Sociology or Philosophy (5/16).

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