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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Jewish Bible Studies - Center for Academic and Religious Excellence

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Proficiency examination administered at the Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.) testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Length:

Varies.

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the examination, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: describe G-d’s creation of the world; discuss the lives and culture of the pre-Abrahamitic population of the Middle East; describe and discuss the major events in the lives of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and analyze their significance; compare and contrast the roles of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as the progenitors of the Jewish people; and explain the significance of G-d’s promise of the land of Cana’an to thier forefathers.

Instruction:

Guided by the classic Rashi commentary, students develop a thorough knowledge of the entire text. Topics include: Creation of the world; Adam and Chava, Cain (Kayin) and Abel (Hevel); the travels of Abraham to and from Cana’an; Hagar and Sarah, Yishmael and Isaac; Sara’s death and Isaac’s marriage to Rebecca; Jacob and Eisav, their relationships with each other and with their parents; Jacob’s sojourn in Charan; Jacob’s wives and the eleven tribes; Jacob’s return to Cana’an; Binyamins’s birth and the death of Rachel; Joseph – his relationship with his father and brothers, his descent to Egypt and events in Egypt; Joseph’s reconciliation with his brothers and reunion with his father; the descent of Jacob and his family to Egypt; and the death of Jacob and his burial in Cana’an.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Comparative Literature, Biblical Studies, or Religious Studies (6/15).

Location:

Proficiency examination administered at the Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.) testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Length:

Varies.

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the examination, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: describe in detail the enslavement of the Jewish People in Egypt; track the life of Moses from its beginning in Egypt, to his escape from Egypt, to his return to Egypt, and finally leading the Jewish people out of Egypt; discuss and analyze the leadership of Moses in Egypt, at Sinai, and during the construction of the Tabernacle (Mishkan); and explore the transformation of the Jewish People from an enslaved nation to G-d’s Chosen People at Sinai.

Instruction:

Guided by the classic Rashi Commentary, students study the following topics: the suffering of the Jewish People in Egypt; the early life of Moses in Egypt and his escape to Midyan; the initial divine revelation to Moses at Sinai; the ten plagues and the exodus from Egypt; the revelation at Mount Sinai; the golden calf; the second set of Ten Commandments; and the erection of the Tabernacle (Mishkan).

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Comparative Literature, Biblical Studies, or Religious Studies (6/15).

Location:

Proficiency examination administered at the Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.) testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Length:

Varies.

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the examination, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: describe the travels and encampment of the Jewish people in the desert during the forty years following their exodus from Egypt; discuss the many miracles experienced by the Jewish people during this period and analyze their results; explore the major positive and negative events that occurred during this period and their impact on the Jewish people; compare and contrast the various wars that were fought in the desert as the Jewish people approached the land of Israel; discuss the special position of the Levites and delineate their responsibilities; categorize the various commandments that were done exclusively in Israel: analyze the role of Moses during the forty year wandering in the desert; and discuss the transition of the Jewish nation from a nation of slaves to a nation that was physically, morally, and spiritually prepared to conquer Israel.

Instruction:

Guided by the classic Rashi commentary, students develop a thorough knowledge of the entire text. Topics include: the order of the three camps in the desert; the laws of sotah, the unfaithful wife; the unfortunate mission of the spies to Israel and the consequences; the rebellion of Korach; the sad aftermath of the events at Mei Mireva; the death of Miriam and Aaron; Balak’s and Bilaam’s attempt to curse the Jewish people and G-d’s intervention; the courage of Pinchus and his reward; and the cities of refuge.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Comparative Literature, Biblical Studies, or Religious Studies (6/15).

Location:

Proficiency examination administered at the Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.) testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Length:

Varies.

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the examination, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: enumerate and discuss the commandments reviewed by Moses in Deuteronomy; describe Moses’s plea to enter the land of Israel and G-d’s response; review and discuss the Ten Commandments; identify the signs of kosher animals and fish; explain and discuss the meaning and significance of Shema; describe Moses’s parting words to the Jewish nation and his subsequent death; and interpret the song of Ha’azinu.

Instruction:

Guided by the classical Rashi commentary, students study the following topics: appointment of judges over the Jewish people; preliminary battles before entering the land of Israel; the cities of refuge; the Ten Commandments; review of events that took place in the desert; warning of possible temptations in Israel; commandments to treat one’s fellow man humanely; the holidays of Passover, Shavuos, Succoth; forbidden marriages and divorce; the song of Ha’azinu; Moshe’s last exhortations and blessing of the Jewish people; and the death of Moses.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hour in Judaic Studies, Comparative Literature, Biblical Studies, or Religious Studies (6/15).

Location:

Proficiency examination administered at the Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.) testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Length:

Varies.

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the examination, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: demonstrate familiarity with the Hebrew narrative of Samuel 1; compare and contrast the qualities of Saul and David; discuss the love between David and Jonathan; discuss the leadership of Samuel as a prophet of Israel; analyze the transition from the leadership Samuel, the prophet, to Saul, the king; contrast the early period of the reign of Saul to the later period; and explore the status of Samuel, Saul and David in the history of the prophets and kings of Israel.

Instruction:

Guided by standard medieval commentaries, students develop a thorough knowledge of the entire text. Topics include: the circumstances leading to the birth of Samuel; Samuel’s early years with Eli, the high priest; the events leading up to Saul’s becoming king; the war with Amalek; its effect on Saul as king and the relationship between Samuel and Saul; Samuel as leader of his people; David’s victory over Goliath and its impact on the relationship between Saul and David; David and Jonathan; David’s flight from Saul; Samuel’s death and burial; Saul’s defeat by the Philistines; and David as the progenitor of the future kings of Judea and the original planner of the first Temple.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hour in Judaic Studies, Comparative Literature, Biblical Studies, or Religious Studies (6/15).

Location:

Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (CARE), Brooklyn. N.Y.

Length:

Proficiency examination program administered at the CARE testing center or at authorized proctor sites.

Dates:

September 2017- Present.

Objectives:

Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: discuss the textual content and become familiar with the narrative of Genesis: discuss the opinions and concepts as discussed in the specified commentaries on various themes in the text; review the process of the creation of the world, of Adam and Eve, the birth of their sons, as delineated in the text; analyze the role of Noah in his generation and compare his impact on his community with Abraham’s; compare the similarities and differences in the lives and goals of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; discuss the lessons of life learned from the lives of the Patriarchs and the Matriarchs; analyze the similarities and differences in the lives of Sara, Rebecca, Rachel, and Leah; discuss the life of Joseph and his relationships with his father and brothers.

Instruction:

To prepare for this exam, students will study the following topics: the creation of the world, of Man, human communal development after Eden; Noah and the flood; the three Patriarchs - each within his own immediate family, his role and impact on his society, and as a founding father of the Jewish nation; the three Matriarchs – as partners in their husbands’ life work, and their respective roles as founding mothers of the Jewish nation; the twelve sons of Jacob, their relationships with their father and respective mothers, and with each other; the descent of Jacobs’ family to Egypt.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Comparative Literature, Biblical Studies, or Religious Studies (9/17). 

Location:

Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (CARE), Brooklyn. N.Y.

Length:

Proficiency examination program administered at the CARE testing center or at authorized proctor sites. 

Dates:

September 2017-Present.

Objectives:

Students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: Examine the textual component of Exodus and be familiar with the narrative; discuss the opinions of the commentaries on various topics in the text; describe the slavery of the Jewish people as delineated in Exodus and in  the commentaries; discuss Moses’s  role throughout the various stages of this period; discuss the transition of the Jewish people from an enslaved people to a free nation; describe the erection of the Mishkan and Moses’s and Betzalal’s roles; analyze the differences between the giving of the first and second sets of Ten Commandments; discuss the civil laws as delineated in Exodus and their effect on the moral standard of the Jewish people; compare the roles of Aaron and Miriam versus that of Moses.

Instruction:

To prepare for this exam, students will study the following topics: the enslavement of the Jewish people in Egypt; Moses’s life from birth until his return to Egypt; the process of redemption, including the ten plagues, the preparation to leave Egypt; crossing the Red Sea, Egypt’s downfall; the road to Sinai, the Ten Commandments; the Golden Calf and its aftermath; laws between man and G-d; laws between man and man; the erection of the Mishkan.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Comparative Literature, Biblical Studies, or Religious Studies (9/17).

Location:

Proficiency examination administered at the Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.) testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Length:

Varies.

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the examination, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: reflect on the psycho-social aspects of the Biblical narrative and its implications for an understanding of Jewish life and behavior; compare and contrast the Ten Commandments as they appear in Deuteronomy and Exodus; enumerate and discuss the commandments to conquer the land, destroy idolatry, and establish life in Israel based on the commandments of the Torah; discuss the future leadership of the Jewish people – the king and the Sanhedrin; discuss the transition of leadership from Moses to Joshua; and analyze the unique greatness of Moses – leader, teacher, prophet.

Instruction:

In order to prepare for this examination, students study various classic and Medrashic commentaries that cover the following topics: the essential qualities of judges of the Jewish nation; the end of the generation of men who had to die in the desert; the fate of Sichon and his country Cheshbon, and Og and his country Bashan; Moses’s plea to enter the land of Israel and his view of the land from the Pisgah; the dire consequences of not following the laws of the Torah; protection of the convert, orphan, and widow; distancing the Jewish people from the culture and gods of the Canaanites; one’s responsibilities toward the poor; kindness toward one’s fellow man and towards all living creatures; law and justice among the people; and reaffirmation of G-d’s promise to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; nature as witness to the glory of G-d, and His special relationship with the Jewish People.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Comparative Literature, Biblical Studies, or Religious Studies (6/15).

Location:

Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (CARE), Brooklyn, NY

Length:

Proficiency examination program administered at the CARE testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Dates:

September 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

The student will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: discuss the spiritual level of the Jews in Persia before, during, and after the period covered in Megilas Esther; analyze the hidden role of Hashem in Jewish history, focusing on the events of Megilas Esther; discuss the qualities of Mordechai and Esther; view the events of Megilas Esther within the script and context of Jewish history; describe the role of the minor characters in the outcome of Megilas Ether; discuss the impact of the events in Megilas Esther on the historical role of the Jewish nation.

Instruction:

In order to prepare for this exam, the students will cover the following topics: the party of King Achashverosh, its purpose and goals vis-à-vis the Jewish people; Vashti’s refusal to appear and consequences of her refusal; the search for a new queen and Esther’s abduction; Bigsan and Seresh’s treason and Mordechai and Esther’s intervention; Haman’s downfall and the victory of the Jews; Mordechai’s rise to power.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Bible Studies, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (9/16).

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