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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Psychology and Sociology - Theological Research Institute

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to understand the nature of abnormal behavior and mental illness; understand the process of assessing such behavior and the most commonly used classifying system; understand psychological disorders; be familiar with and able to discuss several different theoretical perspectives on psychological disorders; be familiar with the research methods used and research findings on various psychological disorders; understand the causes and be able to identify the symptoms of various psychological disorders; be familiar with effective treatment approaches to different psychological disorders; and understand various legal issues relevant to mental illness and abnormal behavior.

Instruction:

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to mental disorders in adult humans. The class discusses diagnostic issues and methods used to study psychopathology. It also examines a variety of mental disorders from several different theoretical and treatment perspectives. The focus of the course is the diagnosis, epidemiology, course of the disorder, etiology, and treatment issues. The class also briefly briefly examines ethical and legal issues pertaining to psychopathology. The goals of the course include greater awareness and knowledge of psychopathology in hopes of reducing the suffering and stigma associated with mental disorders.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, or Human Services (1/22).

Length:

90 hours.

Dates:

August 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to define and discuss the concept of career development from several theoretical perspectives; articulate how career counseling can enhance career development; be able to work with small groups of students for the purpose of career development; support the role of the school counselor in assisting individuals achieve some understanding of how career development can enrich a person’s life; advocate for the role of the school in helping students receive career counseling and career information; understand changes in society and stress the importance of a comprehensive career development plan; discuss and justify the need for career education in our nation’s schools and curriculum advising students on careers from grades K-12; describe challenges minority students may face in trying to secure a career path and recommend several strategies for successfully meeting these challenges; and discuss the role of technologies, personality factors, values, and attitudes that may influence career development and assessment.

Instruction:

The course covers theories of vocational development, career education, career development, and the significance of the world of work in the life of individuals. Strategies relating to career exploration, career-related assessment, application of career development materials, technical and college career tracks of curriculum development, and the exploration of gender and cultural/ethnicity issues that may affect the career development process are emphasized.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Education, Educational Psychology, Adult Education, Continuing Education, or Educational Planning (8/21).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to explain the nature of cognitive and moral development; explain the nature of internal mental processes, including memory and problem solving; explain individual and group differences as they relate to learning and intelligence, including socio-cultural dynamics; identify and describe the major theories, and theorists, that have impacted the study of child development, educational psychology and teaching/learning; and examine the importance of school culture and the learning environment.

Instruction:

This class investigates the primary issues and problems in educational psychology, including those related to development, cognition, behavior, emotion, and culture. The course explores the major theories in these realms and how we can apply them to become better teachers and learners.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, or Educational Studies (1/22).

Length:

90 hours.

Dates:

August 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to articulate the nature and development of family therapy theory; evaluate the benefits and limitations of psychotherapeutic theory as it applies to producing change in human systems; describe the interaction of class, race, gender, and cultural experience on theory development and intervention procedures; articulate a broad understanding of family assessment, including interview, genogram, and formal tools of evaluation; demonstrate an understanding of the basic processes of counseling from intake to termination of therapy; write an intake assessment and plan a course of treatment for a family; apply systemic categories to conceptualize family organization, family subsystems, and transgenerational processes in a therapeutic context; and demonstrate an understanding of narrative and brief solution-focused therapy in class discussions and case demonstrations.

Instruction:

This course provides theoretical and practical foundations for the practice of family therapy. In this course, students will explore the nature and development of family therapy, its impact on understanding human motivation and relationship systems, and explore its application in clinical practice. This will include a focus on family organization, family subsystems, and transgenerational processes as they apply to assessment, case conceptualization, treatment, and practice of family therapy.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Counseling, Human Services, Family Therapy, or Social Work (8/21).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to explain and distinguish among the major theoretical approaches utilized in psychology; demonstrate an understanding of the history of psychology as it relates to the natural sciences, social sciences, and applied disciplines; understand the history of psychology as it relates to the evolution of methods of research and inquiry as well as theoretical conflicts; and explore the nature of scientific progress, as discussed by philosophers, historians, and sociologists of science.

Instruction:

This course introduces the study of the nature and purpose of philosophical reflection. The course emphasizes questions related to history and systems, reviews historical antecedents of contemporary psychology, and explores the critical analysis of selected psychological theories and the application of these theories in contemporary psychology.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, or Human Development (1/22).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

August 2021 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: demonstrate understanding of the terminology used in psychology; identify research models and relate the findings of research to life situations; demonstrate understanding of the different theoretical approaches to psychology and be able to articulate the different assumptions behind them; apply psychology practically to problems confronting individuals in society; use psychological techniques to explain various aspects of human cognition and behavior; and demonstrate understanding of the workings of their own consciousness, behavior, and interpersonal relationships.

Instruction:

This course will introduce the fundamental principles of psychology and major subjects of psychological inquiry. It has been designed to not only provide the tools necessary for the study of psychology, but to present a sampling of the major areas of psychology research. The course begins with a short overview of how psychology developed as an academic discipline and an introduction to a number of the principal methodologies most commonly deployed in its study.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Psychology (8/21).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021 - Present

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to understand the sequence of human development, the processes underlying developmental change and stability, and the theoretical perspectives currently being used to examine human development; understand the research methods currently being used to examine human development; understand explanations for individual differences in development; and understand ethical principles underlying developmental research with children and adults.

Instruction:

This course provides students with an introduction to the theories, concepts, research methods, and findings relevant to the study of human development throughout the lifespan. Major developmental theories and issues are presented. Emphasis is placed on the integration of lifespan principles and concepts into individual social contexts. The effects of heredity and environment and ethical issues surrounding development are also explored.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, or Allied Health (1/22).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

October 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this learning experience, students will be able to: define and articulate key concepts, findings, and controversies in the emerging field of positive psychology; discuss research methods (including measures, interventions, and research paradigms) used in positive psychology research; evaluate evidence for the validity, both internal and external, of empirical claims in contemporary positive psychology research; and articulate from first-hand experience with positive psychology activities a perspective on how positive psychology is (or is not) relevant in life.

Instruction:

Positive psychology encompasses the study of positive experiences, positive character strengths, positive relationships, and the institutions and practices that facilitate their development. Positive experiences include the mental states of flow and mindfulness and emotions about the present (e.g., pleasure, contentment, laughter), past (e.g., nostalgia, satisfaction, pride), and future (e.g., hope and optimism). This course also reviews the history of positive psychology and the contributions that this new field has made to several traditional research areas in psychology. Consideration will be given to conflicting viewpoints and their respective empirical support, including the benefits of balancing positive with negative emotions, the measurement and development of happiness, and the implications of deliberately attempting to increase it.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Positive Psychology, or Psychology (10/20).

Length:

90 hours.

Dates:

August 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to describe the salient features of mentoring relationships; demonstrate an understanding of a range of mentoring practices that correspond to adult learning theories, including problems, or behavioral specific needs of the mentee; identify variances in mentoring behaviors that may be recommended in different gender and/or racial mentor-mentee relationships; develop a model mentoring plan for management of a school or district mentoring program that improves teacher performance using EDUCATEAlabama; recommend a method to measure the effects of a mentoring relationship related to the mentor, mentee, and organization; and organize and develop a research-based field experience mentoring design related to mentoring in the educational setting that focuses on providing high-quality learning experiences, coaching, and feedback.

Instruction:

This course is focused on the development of knowledge and skills related to a mentor-mentee relationship. Using collaborative teaching and learning strategies, this course engages in the examination of mentor behaviors and skills focused on mental development through the use of research, observation, and field experience practice. The core of this course’s instructional content is anchored in practical, embedded field experiences, designed collaboratively with school principals, mentors and coaches and focused on improving teacher performance.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, Education, Educational Psychology, Adult Education, Continuing Education, or Educational Planning (8/21).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

June 2021 - Present

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to describe and discuss the methods used in most psychological research including experimental, correlational, and naturalistic approaches; locate research literature in the field of psychology; identify the appropriate statistical analysis for different research designs; evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the methods employed in selected studies in terms of internal and external validity; describe the logic of experimentation; and describe the main themes of the American Psychological Association (APA) guidelines on ethics.

Instruction:

This course provides an opportunity for participants to establish or advance their understanding of research through critical exploration of research language, ethics, and approaches. The course introduces the language of research, ethical principles and challenges, and the elements of the research process within quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods approaches. Participants use these theoretical underpinnings to begin to critically review literature relevant to their field or interests and determine how research findings are useful in forming their understanding of their work, and the social, local, and global environment.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Psychology, or Social Sciences (1/22).

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