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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Jewish Studies - Theological Research Institute

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

45 hours (10 weeks).

Dates:

December 2011 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the concepts and application of traditional Jewish teachings and mystical practices within the context of modern society; learn the general structure and order of the Torah belief system and how this defines the essential character of the "Jewish perspective”; analyze and assess what happens when the Jewish perspective is at odds with modern opinions and bias; evaluate a wide range of topics, including: the cyclical nature of time; core concepts in Jewish philosophy; ritual practice as related to prayer and the festivals; stringencies in dietary law and animal slaughter, sexual limitations, and freedoms; an explanation of the Torah's written and oral transmissions; and define the concept of "Chosen People," and anti-Semitism.

Instruction:

This course is delivered in a distance learning format with a proctored proficiency exam. It includes a study of faith versus knowledge, Monotheism, the Jewish calendar as a tool for growth, the Jewish view of love, relationships, and prayer, Kosher Laws, Understanding the Shabbat, and History of Oral Law.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish Philosophy (6/15) (10/20 revalidation).

Length:

124.5 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:
May 2011 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to discuss the elements of the chapters of the Book of Joshua concerning the entering of the Jewish people into the holy land; explore the Divine explanations of the Book of Joshua and Judges found in the Oral Torah; and examine and analyze the text using a variety of classical Jewish commentaries.

Instruction:

This course is delivered in a distance learning format with a proctored proficiency exam. It includes a study of the Book of Joshua and Judges with a compendium of Prophets, Writings, Babylonian Talmud, Jerusalem Talmud, Malbim, Maharal, Nachmanides, Radak and others, focusing on understanding the major religious and historical elements. Students conduct a close reading of the text to uncover the meaning and understand the message of the narrative.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Classics, and Bible Studies (8/11) (3/17 revalidation). 

Length:

Self-study; self-paced.

Dates:

August 31, 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to respond accurately to questions about the key ideas taught in Pirkei Avos; identify primary sources for ethical principles taught in Pirkei Avos; demonstrate familiarity with teachings within Pirkei Avos as explained by commentaries; describe how the ethical teaching of Pirkei Avos is relevant to everyday situations and challenges; compare and contrast different approaches to personal conduct taught by varied sages; and articulate key concepts of how to approach one’s relationship to G-d, his fellow man, and himself based on the lessons of Pirkei Avos.

Instruction:

Ethics of the Fathers is a study of the ethical teachings of the Tannaic sages from the beginning of the Oral Transmission of the Torah that began with the Members of the Great Assembly and Rabbi Shimon the Righteous. This tractate, Pirkei Avos, literally the Chapters of our Fathers, will be studied along with essential commentaries and teachings such as Rabbi Ovadia Bartnura, Rabbeinu Yonah, and others, in addition to the classic commentary by Rabbi Irving Bunim, Ethics from Sinai.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Talmudic Studies, Philosophy, Sociology, Religious Studies, or Ethics (8/21).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

August 31, 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: answer questions about the significant life events and impact of the seven prophetesses; describe the challenges that each of these women faced and how they met these challenges; understand the historical context within which these women lived and how this was significant in the roles they played; analyze lessons from the lives of these extraordinary women and apply them to the challenges of Jewish women living in a modern world; and articulate how these prophetesses navigated their relationships with the significant men in their lives.

Instruction:

The course focuses on seven extraordinary female leaders in the Torah known as the seven Prophetesses - Sara, Miriam, Devorah, Chanah, Avigail, Chuldah, and Ester. Students will study the Torah sections that relate to each of these women, together with select commentaries.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Philosophy, Sociology, Literature, Religious Studies, Bible Studies, Hebrew Language, or Women’s Studies (8/21).

Length:

124.5 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: demonstrate a mastery of the Hebrew alphabet, and basic pronunciations of letters and words; gain a deeper insight into the structure of the Hebrew letters and how they relate to mathematics, science, and philosophy; and clearly articulate how the Hebrew words are essentially defined based on the nature of the letters they are composed of.

Instruction:

This course is delivered in a distance learning format with a proctored proficiency exam. It includes a study of the Hebrew Alphabet and Language including speech and pronounciations and the meaning behind the letters. Methods of instruction include: required readings, essays, quizzes, required interaction with the course instructor, and final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Hebrew Language or Jewish Thought (6/15) (10/20 revalidation).

Length:

45 hours.

Dates:

August 31, 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to know and understand the foundations of Hebrew grammar; be familiar with the Hebrew verb system, including the present, past, and future tenses and infinitives of all active verbs and some passive forms; know and understand the wide Hebrew vocabulary; know and understand the appropriateness of many Hebrew structures and expressions in a given context; understand short, unedited passages in written Hebrew on everyday topics, as well as general themes; be able to produce short passages in written Hebrew on everyday topics, to express an opinion and formulate an argument; be able to understand spoken Hebrew and to engage in short spoken discourse on a variety of topics; and know and understand the role of language in general, and Hebrew in particular, in language-based scholarship and research, a specific learning outcome for students.

Instruction:

This course provides students with an intermediate knowledge of Hebrew and practice of using Hebrew in a variety of everyday situations. It allows students to interact with Hebrew speakers in Hebrew and to use original Hebrew language sources within the level covered in the course. This provides students with a basis to approach research topics relating to modern Hebrew language, and its revival.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religious Studies, Hebrew Language and Literature, Semitic Languages, Language, or Hebrew (8/21).

Length:

Self-study, self paced. 

Dates:

July 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze and discuss the elements of the significant scriptural and secondary sources concerning Jewish History; explore the historical and sociological elements of relevant historical events leading up to the medieval ages; examine and analyze the text using a variety of classical commentaries and pertinent academic studies done by experts; and develop and apply historical research skills and techniques

Instruction:

This course provides a comprehensive review of the Jewish existence from Biblical times, through the Second Temple period and the Middle Ages and covers major historical events and turning points, exposing students to primary sources including archeological artifacts, ancient texts, relevant architecture and art, as well as the leading research in the topics discussed, both classic and contemporary. Historical events are reviewed through the prism of three themes unique to the Jewish people during this period: the Biblical Revolution, the Exile and connection to the land, and the Jewish solidarity among dispersed communities.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish History or Judaic Studies or Religion (7/18).

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

July 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze and discuss the elements of major historical works covering modern Jewish History; examine the various locations of the Jewish exile and how they affected elements of historical events leading up to the modern times; examine and analyze the impact the Jewish people had on historical records of modern Kingdoms and Empires and on modern academic works; and develop and apply historical research skills and techniques.

Instruction:

This course is a comprehensive review of the Jewish existence from the Middle Ages to modern times and covers major historical events and turning points. The course exposes students to primary sources including a variety of Jewish texts and literature, architecture and art, as well as the leading research in the topics discussed, both classic and contemporary. Major historical events, including the Jewish Question, the Holocaust, and the Zionist movement are reviewed with a focus on their global impact.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish History or Judaic Studies or Religion (7/18).

Length:

70 hours. 

Dates:

December 2019 – Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discern between the apodictic Amoraic material and the anonymous discursive stratum; evaluate and analyze the various models of the formation of the Talmud and their impact upon the understanding of the text; evaluate the nature of the forced explanations prevalent throughout the Talmud and specifically in the discursive stratum; apply form criticism to determine the setting in life of the early Talmudic transmission and teaching; and evaluate the various modes of oral transmission and their impact upon our written version of the Talmud.

Instruction:

This course explores the various theories about formation of the Talmud, from the traditional view of Y. I. Halevy in his Dorot Harishonim to the diametrically opposed contemporary models of D. W. Halivni and Shamma Friedman. Students analyze their theories and evaluate their literary evidence as well as apply their models to the critical reading of the Talmudic text. Students also explore an alternative model which combines these diverse theories considering the oral matrix of the Talmud during its early phase and the diverse modes of oral transmission. All texts will be read in translation. No previous knowledge of Talmud is necessary. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Talmud, Jewish Literature, Judaic Studies, Jewish History, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, Hebrew Literature or Religion (12/19). 

Length:

Self study, self-paced.

Dates:

July 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze and discuss the multiple facets of U.S. - Israel relations from a historical and modern viewpoint; identify, discuss, and apply different Jewish concepts acquired in this course to contemporary lives; examine and analyze multiple perspectives of geopolitical scenarios; and compare and contrast current geopolitical perspectives of internationally respected experts with an understanding of modern-day geopolitical issues.

Instruction:

This course discusses the nature of Israel’s diverse population and presents analyses and commentaries on Israeli foreign policy, foreign policy-making in a multi-party (proportional representation) parliamentary system, the major actors in the foreign policy process, and Israel’s international relations vis a vis her security dilemma. The course focuses on the basic tenets of the Israeli political system as well as Israeli foreign and defense strategy, threats and opportunities facing Israel today, the structures and processes of Israeli decision making, including their strengths and weaknesses, and the role of the peace process in Israel’s political and national security strategic thinking. Topics include the U.S.-Israel relationship, unfolding Israeli relations with China and Russia, and Israel’s evolving future as a regional and global power and its place among the nations.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Jewish History, Judaic Studies, or Religion (7/18).

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