Skip to main content

National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Inactive Learning Experiences - Associate Program and Other LOMA courses

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: Independent study.

Dates:

Version 1: June 1995 - October 2000. Version 2: November 2000 - December 2013.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the function of management and basic management principles; recognize common problems in the business office environment and identify potential solutions; and describe techniques for maximizing the productivity of administrative staff members and controlling expenses. Version 2: Upon successful completion of the coures, students will be able to: discuss effective resource management in an office environment; identify practical ways to provide support for agents; recognize compliance and sales practice issues that affect agents and field offices; explain how to use technology to improve communication;and identify principles of financial management; identify methods of recruiting, training, and evaluating employees.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: basic principles of management; managing a culturally diverse workforce; communication networks; recruiting and orientation; supervision and training; salary administration; office automation and ergonomics; managing office information systems; improving office productivity; examining workplace issues. These topics are discussed in both a general context and the context of the organization and systems used in an insurance agency office. Version 2: Major topics include: insurance marketing and distribution; compliance and ethics; functions of the supervisor; quality and teams; using technology; communication; projecting a professional image; office management; identifying and hiring employees; compensating, training, and appraising employees; working with people. These topics are discussed in both a general context and the context of the organization and systems used in an insurance agency office.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Office Management or Administrative Office Systems (12/95) (1/01 revalidation) (7/06 revalidation) (6/12 Administrative Review). NOTE: This course overlaps with Management Principles and Practices (LOMA 330). If both courses are completed, a total of 4 semester hours is recommended.

Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:
Version 1: November 1999 - July 2006. Version 2: August 2006 - December 2014.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the importance of annuities; describe the key provisions of an annuity contract; distinguish among fixed, equity-indexed, and variable annuities; apply investment principles to annuities; describe the different types of individual and group annuities; explain how annuities are taxed and regulated; and describe the marketing of annuities.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Major topics include: basic annuity concepts; the annuity contract; fixed, equity-indexed, variable, and market value adjusted annuities; investment principles and annuities; individual and group annuities; taxation and regulation of annuities; marketing annuities.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour as an elective in Insurance or Business Administration (1/01). NOTE: If this course and Marketing, Distribution, and Uses of Annuities (AAPA 283) are both completed, a total of 3 semester hours are recommended for the two courses. Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour as an elective in Insurance or Business Administration (7/06 revalidation) (6/12 Administrative Review). NOTE: When a student completes more than one course with an AAPA course number and the credit recommendations for these courses total 3 semester hours, the combined credit recommendation is equivalent to a semester-length course in Annuities. Further, when a student completes more than one course with an AAPA course number and the credit recommendations for these courses total 6 semester hours, the combined credit recommendation is equivalent to two semester-length courses in Annuities.

Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:
July 2001 - December 2015.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the tasks involved in annuity administration; describe the company and environmental factors that determine the nature of annuity administration; and explain the role of information technology in facilitating and improving annuity administration.

Instruction:

Major topics include: new business procedures; in-force administration; disbursements, including surrenders, withdrawals, death benefits, loans, and free-look cancellations; customer contact center; payout administration; information technology for annuity administration; electronic commerce.

Credit recommendation:
In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour as an elective in Insurance or Business Administration (6/02) (1/08 revalidation). NOTE: When a student completes more than one course with an AAPA course number and the credit recommendations for these courses total 3 semester hours, the combined credit recommendation is equivalent to a semester-length course in Annuities. Further, when a student completes more than one course with an AAPA course number and the credit recommendations for these courses total 6 semester hours, the combined credit recommendation is equivalent to two semester-length courses in Annuities.
Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:
July 2001 - December 2012.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the marketing implications of the different roles a customer plays (user, payer, and buyer); explain how to identify, measure, and create market values for customers; explain how personal characteristics of customers influence customer behavior; describe how perception and learning affect customer decision making; discuss the motivational process and identify the needs, emotions, and moods that motivate customers; define attitudes and explain how they influence customer behavior; identify the steps of the decision-making process for household and business customers; and  identify the challenges, rewards, and needs of intermediary customers.

Instruction:

Major topics include: managerial importance of customer behavior; multiple customer roles; market values customers seek; financial services customers; determinants of customer behavior; the customer as perceiver and listener; customer motivation: needs, emotions, and psychographics; customer attitudes; market differentiation and segmentation; understanding intermediaries as customers; individual customer decision making; business customer decision making; understanding consumers as financial services customers; customer loyalty to products; relationship-based buying; creating market values for the customer.

Credit recommendation:
In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Marketing (6/02) (1/08 revalidation).
Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:
January 2002 - December 2012.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the role and importance of customer contacts in the financial services industry; describe customer access strategies and their influence on an organizations overall success; identify the factors financial services firms consider when developing and improving customer contacts; explain various ways organizations can be structured to provide customer contacts; describe various processes financial services firms use to provide customer contacts; and describe the uses of technology in facilitating customer contacts.

Instruction:

Major topics include: an overview of customer contacts; participants and expectations; strategic and tactical planning; key planning issues; organizational structure; workflow processes; workforce management; human resources in customer contacts; managing technology in customer contacts; types of customer contact technology; knowledge management in customer contacts; and measuring and reporting customer contacts.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours as an elective in Business Administration (6/02) (1/08 revalidation). NOTE: If this course and Customer Relationship Management (PCS 393) are both completed, a total of 5 semester hours are recommended for both courses in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, as an elective in Business Administration.

Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:
January 2002 - December 2012.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define customer relationship management (CRM); identify the key benefits and challenges associated with implementing CRM; identify the steps that financial organizations take to prepare for CRM; describe the role of customer information in CRM, and describe the privacy concern associated with the collection and use of this information; explain how financial organizations develop customer strategies and channel strategies, and describe typical elements of these strategies; explain the steps involved in implementing a CRM initiative and measuring return on investment; describe the importance of data governance and integration; list technologies used to automate CRM business processes; and list practical applications of CRM for financial services companies.

Instruction:

Major topics include: preparing the organization for CRM; the role of customer information; protecting customer privacy; customer strategies; channel strategies; CRM infrastructure: people, processes, and technology; implementing CRM; measuring CRM success; data governance and integration; technology associated with CRM; CRM applications in financial services.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours as an elective in Business Administration (6/02) (1/08 revalidation). NOTE: If this course and Customer Contacts: Strategies and Operations (PCS 392) are both completed, a total of 5 semester hours are recommended for both courses in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, as an elective in Business Administration.

Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:

Version 1: May 2000 - April 2007. Version 2: May 2007 - December 2015.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain basic financial concepts, including the time value of money, and how they relate to annuities; discuss investment principles and how they relate to annuities; describe the factors involved in calculating annuity cost factors; and discuss financial aspects of pension plans. Version 2:  Students will be able to: describe the annuity product development process; explain basic financial concepts, including the time value of money, and how they relate to annuities; discuss investment principles and how they relate to annuities; describe how insurers calculate annuity values and annuity reserves; and explain how insurers use quantitative modeling in product design, product management, and enterprise risk management.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: product development; pricing annuities; investing and portfolio management; time value of money calculations; calculating annuity cost factors and other annuity charges; cash values for annuities; testing the financial product design; financial aspects of pension plans. Version 2: This course describes the technical elements of individual nonqualified annuity products and related financial concepts. Major topics include: new annuity product development; technical design of annuities;company expenses in annuity design; principles of annuity mortality; accumulation value and interest earnings; investing and investments for annuities; time value of money calculations; annuity reserves and reserve valuation; risk management and annuities; financial modeling for insurance companies; annuity performance measures, and testing for annuity profitability.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours as an elective in Insurance or Business Administration (1/01) (7/06 revalidation) (6/12 Administrative Review). NOTE: When a student completes more than one course with an AAPA course number and the credit recommendations for these courses total 3 semester hours, the combined credit recommendation is equivalent to a semester-length course in Annuities. Further, when a student completes more than one course with an AAPA course number and the credit recommendations for these courses total 6 semester hours, the combined credit recommendation is equivalent to two semester-length courses in Annuities.

Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:
Version 1: November 1999 - July 2006. Version 2: August 2006 - December 2007. Version 3: January 2008 - December 2015.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the market for annuity sales in terms of size, demographic characteristics, and growth potential; discuss the most common uses of annuities; describe the development and financial design of an annuity product; describe promotional activities undertaken by insurers; discuss the advantages and disadvantages of alternative distributors of annuity products; and discuss the regulation of annuity marketing. Version 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the major factors that affect the market for annuities; describe the marketing process, marketing exchanges, and the steps in marketing management; describe the concepts of risk and return and the time value of money; explain how annuities can be used to accumulate, protect, and distribute assets; explain how a company segments the consumer and organizational annuity markets and selects target markets; describe the development and financial design process for an annuity product; describe the types of distribution systems used for annuities and the factors that affect a company's selection of distribution channels; describe promotion tools and strategies and promotional activities for annuity marketing; describe the purchase decision process and the sales process for an annuity; and explain the state and federal regulation of annuity products, distribution, and marketing.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: characteristics of the annuity market; uses of annuities; marketing basics; product development and financial design of annuities; promotion and distribution of annuities; selling individual and group annuities; regulation of annuity marketing; trends in marketing annuities. Version 2: This course introduces the principles of annuities, the annuity contract process, and the major types of annuity products and includes information on individual and group annuities, the marketing of annuities, and the taxation and regulation of annuities. Major topics include: markets and uses for annuities; principles of marketing; product design and development; product promotion, sales, and distribution; marketing for group annuities; U.S. and Canadian regulation of annuity marketing. Version 3: This course examines the current market for and uses of annuities. The course also describes how annuities are developed, priced, distributed, promoted, and regulated in the United States. Major topics include: the role of annuities in the financial services marketplace; marketing basics; uses of annuities for asset accumulation, protection, and distribution; market identification; product development and financial design; distribution and promotion of annuities; linking sales practices to customer behavior; and state and federal regulation of annuities.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour as an elective in Insurance or Business Administration (1/01). NOTE: If this course and Annuity Principles and Products (AAPA 273) are both completed, a total of 3 semester hours are recommended for the two courses. Version 2 and 3: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour as an elective in Insurance or Business Administration (7/06 revalidation) (6/12 Administrative Review). NOTE: When a student completes more than one course with an AAPA course number and the credit recommendations for these courses total 3 semester hours, the combined credit recommendation is equivalent to a semester-length course in Annuities. Further, when a student completes more than one course with an AAPA course number and the credit recommendations for these courses total 6 semester hours, the combined credit recommendation is equivalent to two semester-length courses in Annuities.

Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:

January 2001 - December 2015. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain how insurers are authorized and producers are licensed to sell annuities; describe the state regulatory requirements that are imposed on annuity products; describe state market conduct regulation of companies that issue annuities; describe state solvency regulation of companies that issue annuities; explain how individual annuities are regulated at the federal level by the SEC and NASD; and describe the income, gift, and estate taxation of annuities.

Instruction:

Major topics include: dual system of federal and state regulation; state regulation of companies, producers, and annuity products; state regulation of market conduct; state regulation of insurer solvency; federal regulation of annuities; income tax treatment of annuities; and gift and estate taxation of annuities.

Credit recommendation:
In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour as an elective in Insurance or Business Administration (6/02) (1/08 revalidation). NOTE: When a student completes more than one course with an AAPA course number and the credit recommendations for these courses total 3 semester hours, the combined credit recommendation is equivalent to a semester-length course in Annuities. Further, when a student completes more than one course with an AAPA course number and the credit recommendations for these courses total 6 semester hours, the combined credit recommendation is equivalent to two semester-length courses in Annuities.
Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:

Version 1: May 1998 - June 2004. Version 2: July 2004 - December 2013.  

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: distinguish between the rules of the state government and the federal government in regulating the life and health insurance industry; describe how the NAIC and the NCOIL affect state regulation of insurance; identify types of activities state insurance departments engage in to conduct their regulatory review of insurers; identify an insurer's compliance responsibilities regarding agent licensing and agent conduct; identify stages in the product development process when an insurer must evaluate whether materials comply with state insurance laws and regulations; identify the types of market conduct examinations conducted by state insurance departments; identify activities that are prohibited by federal anti-trust laws; and recognize the duties of an insurer that markets products subject to federal regulation as securities.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: evolution of insurance regulation; organization of the compliance function; compliance and ethics; state regulation of the insurance industry; market conduct regulation; regulation of insurer solvency; insurance holding company systems; federal regulation of insurance and securities; federal taxation of insurance products. Version 2: This course describes the structure of state and federal insurance regulation within the framework of financial services organizations and focuses on how specific roles and functions within a financial services company are affected by the changing nature of these compliance issues. Major topics include: introduction to compliance; state regulation of the insurance industry; state regulation of insurance company formation and operation; state regulation of insurance producers; state filing and approval requirements; state regulation of insurance operations; market conduct examinations; regulation of insurer solvency; insurance holding company systems; federal regulation of insurance; federal regulation of securities; federal taxation of insurance products.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Insurance (12/99) (12/04 revalidation) (3/10 revalidation).

Top