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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Inactive Learning Experiences - FLMI Courses

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:
September 1998 - December 2011.*
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply basic microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts to understanding consumer behavior and financial services operations; interpret graphs illustrating demand and supply; distinguish among the major types of money market and capital market instruments used by individuals and businesses; describe the origin, behavior, and structure of interest rates; describe the major types of financial institutions, including the products they offer and typical assets and liabilities of each; comprehend the problem of asymmetric information and describe its impact on the financial services environment; discuss steps that financial institutions can take to manage the risks they face; and describe how financial institutions create money and how central banks control the supply of money in an economy.

Instruction:

Major topics include: economic constraints and production possibilities; market characteristics, structures and institutions; supply, demand and equilibrium; maximizing profit; understanding interest rates; theory of portfolio choice; theory of efficient capital markets; financial innovation; the foreign exchange market; money, capital and mortgage markets; theory of financial structure; commercial banks; savings and loans and credit unions; banking regulation; insurance companies and pension funds; finance companies and financial conglomerates; securities markets and firms; risk management in financial institutions; financial derivatives; introduction to the money supply process; central banks and the conduct of monetary policy.

Credit recommendation:
In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Finance (12/99) (12/04 revalidation). *NOTE: Earlier versions of this course, dating from January 1965 to August 1998, have been recommended for credit. Please refer to Economics and Investments (FLMI 350) under 73 for further information. NOTE: This course is also listed under the 72.
Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:

Version 2: November 1993 - April 2000.* Version 3: May 2000 – December 2004.

Objectives:

Version 2: Students will be able to: explain the importance of information systems for managerial end-users; identify components and functions of an information system; explain fundamental concepts of management science and the application of management science tools and techniques to the decision-making process; explain the principles and uses of basic statistics and the role of statistics in decision-making. Version 3: Students will be able to: explain the importance and functions of information systems in insurance companies; describe the processes involved in creating and maintaining databases and inferential statistics that can be applied to analyzing work processes; explain basic descriptive and inferential statistics and basic management models to use in decision making.

Instruction:

Version 2: Major topics include: use of information systems for operations, management, and strategic advantage; managerial overview of hardware, software, telecommunications, and database management; end user computing and office automation; artificial intelligence in business; management of information technology, including planning, implementation and control, international issues, and ethical dimensions; introductory statistical concepts, including frequency distributions, variance, correlation, regression, normal probability distribution, sampling, and chi-square tests; overview of management science, including decision theory models, forecasting methods, inventory models, network models, and linear programming. Version 3: Information systems in organizations; computer hardware and software; telecommunications and networks; Internet technology; transaction processing; electronic commerce; enterprise resource planning; management information systems; decision support systems; artificial intelligence and expert systems; systems investigation, analysis, design, implementation, maintenance, and review; security, privacy, and ethical issues in information systems and the Internet; using descriptive and inferential statistics to manage information; using decision theory and linear programming to manage information; applying management science models to business operations.

Credit recommendation:

Version 2 and 3: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management Information Systems (4/86) (9/94 revalidation) (1/01 revalidation). NOTE: This course represents a revision of Systems and Data Processing (Part 7). It is sufficiently different to warrant a separate course exhibit and credit recommendation. *NOTE: An earlier version of this course, dating from July 1985 to December 1992, has been recommended for credit. Please refer to information in Insurance Companies [Course 6] under 73 for further information.

Location:

Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.

Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:

July 2004 - May 2013. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the investment environment and the general principles of investing in individual securities and portfolios of securities; explain how investment performance is reported, monitored, and analyzed; discuss how the risk-return tradeoff setting and implementing investment goals; discuss the following aspects of institutional investing; roles of investment professionals, investment information systems, investment accounting and controls, investment compliance, and management of general and separate account portfolios.

Instruction:

This course covers the investment environment and the general principles of investing in both individual securities and portfolios of securities, setting and implementing investment goals in light of the risk-return trade-off, and investing in an institutional setting, including roles, administrative systems and processes, goal setting, performance reviews, and risk management. Topics include: the role and scope of investments; investment markets and transactions; online investing, information, and trading; investment return and risk; modern portfolio concepts; bond investments; bond valuation and analysis; common stock investments; stock valuation and investment decisions; mutual funds; institutional asset allocation; management of the investment function in institutions; marketing investing services to businesses and other institutions; accounting for investment expenses, managing transaction expenses; institutional approaches to risk management; investment compliance, prospectuses, registration, declaration of interest rates.  

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Financial Services (12/04) (3/10 revalidation).

Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:

Version 3: June 1989 - May 1997.* Version 4: June 1997 - December 2005.

Objectives:

Version 3: Students will be able to: describe and apply the legal principles pertinent to life and health insurance company products and life and health insurance company operations. Version 4: Students will be able to: explain the functions of insurance regulations, administrative rules, and statutory requirements; define contract law and the concept of agency; describe the legal basis for essential insurance functions, including beneficiary designations and changes, settlement agreements, wills, trusts, assignments, policy contests, and reinstatement; identify common errors in policy handling and customer relationships.

Instruction:

Version 3: Topics include: Insurance and the law; contracts; agency; legal and equitable remedies; formation and structure of the life insurance contract; beneficiaries; property rights in the policy; agreements, trusts, and wills; contesting the contract; premiums and dividends; borrowing on the policy; assignments and other transfers; lapse and reinstatement; group insurance; life and health insurance advertising; privacy and insurance; employment discrimination. Version 4: Topics include: the legal environment and regulation of the insurance industry; contract law and agency law; tort law and property law; remedies; formation of a life insurance contract; policy provisions, benefits, and statutory requirements; policy beneficiaries; premiums, non-forfeiture benefits, and policy loans; rights of the insured and of third parties; life insurance contract contests; performance of a life insurance contract; group insurance and health insurance; government-sponsored benefit programs; consumer protection laws; employment laws.

Credit recommendation:

Version 3 and 4: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Insurance or Legal Studies (1/75) (5/85 revalidation) (5/90 revalidation) (12/97 revalidation) (6/02 revalidation). *NOTE: Earlier versions of this course, dating from January 1965 to May 1989, have been recommended for credit. Please consult the 1990 print Directory for further information or contact NCCRS NOTE: This course overlaps in content with both Legal Aspects of Life and Health Insurance - U.S. (LOMA 310) and Business Law for Financial Services Professionals (LOMA 311). Credit is recommended for the completion of only one course.

Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:

Version 3: June 1989 - May 1997.* Version 4: June 1997 - December 2004.

Objectives:

Version 3: Students will be able to: describe and apply the legal principles pertinent to life and health insurance company products and life and health insurance company operations. Version 4: Students will be able to: explain the functions of insurance regulations, administrative rules, and statutory requirements; define contract law and the concept of agency; describe the legal basis for essential insurance functions, including beneficiary designations and changes, settlement agreements, wills, trusts, assignments, policy contests, and reinstatement; identify common errors in policy handling and customer relationships.

Instruction:

Version 3: Major topics include: Insurance and the law; contracts; agency; legal and equitable remedies; formation and structure of the life insurance contract; beneficiaries; property rights in the policy; agreements, trusts, and wills; contesting the contract; premiums and dividends; borrowing on the policy; assignments and other transfers; lapse and reinstatement; group insurance; life and health insurance advertising; privacy and insurance; employment discrimination. Version 4: The legal environment; contracts and agency; life and health insurance agency; waiver and estoppel; formation and structure of a life insurance policy; policy provisions, benefits, and limitations; property rights in a life insurance policy; beneficiary designations and changes; settlement options, trusts, and wills; premiums and dividends; non-forfeiture provisions and policy loans; assignments and other transfers; lapse and reinstatement; remedies, policy contests, and contract performance; group insurance and health insurance; annuity contracts; insurance advertising and privacy; insurers and agents as employers.

Credit recommendation:

Version 3 and 4: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Insurance or Legal Studies (1/75) (5/85 revalidation) (5/90 revalidation) (12/97 revalidation) (6/02 revalidation). *NOTE: Earlier versions of this course, dating from January 1965 to May 1989, have been recommended for credit. Please consult the 1990 print Directory for further information or contact NCCRS. NOTE: This course overlaps in content with both Legal Aspects of Life and Health Insurance - Canada (LOMA 315) and Business Law for Financial Services Professionals (LOMA 311). Credit is recommended for the completion of only one course.

Location:
Length:
99 hours (3 weeks); residential.
Dates:
May 1970 - May 1980.
Objectives:
Instruction:
Credit recommendation:
In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management (11/75).
Location:
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:
January 1973 - June 1985.
Objectives:
Instruction:
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in General Management (11/74). NOTE: While the content of this course and Management of Organizations and Human Resources (Course 5) may appear to be similar, they are sufficiently different to warrant separate course exhibits and credit recommendations.

Formerly:
Location:
Independent study and proficiency examination program administered from the central offices of LOMA.
Length:

Varies-independent study.

Dates:

Version 2: June 1989 - October 2000.* Version 3: November 2000 - October 2004. Version 4: November 2004 - January 2008.

Objectives:

Version 2 and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain basic management concepts and principles within the organizational context and the environments within which organizations operate; apply the management functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling in organizational contexts. Version 4: Includes all outcomes from Version 2 and 3; in addition, students will be able to: explain the importance and functions of information systems in insurance companies and explain basic descriptive and inferential statistics and basic management models for use in decision making.

Instruction:

Version 2: Major topics include: introduction to management theory; external environment of organizations; social responsibility and ethics; strategic planning and decision-making; division of work; human resource management; motivation, performance, and satisfaction; leadership; communication; financial control; productivity control; information systems and control; performance appraisals; international management. Version 3: Major topics include: the nature of management; evolution of management thought; the changing environment of management; putting quality first; social and ethical responsibility; planning, decision making, and problem solving; organizing, managing human resources, and communicating; motivating, leading, and team building; groups and communication; control and operations management; international management. Version 4: All topics in Version 3; in addition, using descriptive and inferential statistics to manage information; using decision theory and linear programming to manage information; applying management science models to business operations.

Credit recommendation:

Version 2, 3, and 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in General Management (4/86) (5/90 revalidation) (12/95 revalidation) (1/01 revalidation) (7/06 revalidation) (1/08 revalidation). NOTE: This course is not recommended for credit in Human Resource Management. *NOTE: An earlier version of this course, dating from July 1985 to May 1989, has been recommended for credit. Please consult the 1994 print Directory for further information or contact NCCRS. NOTE: This course overlaps with Agency Administration (AIAA 200). If both courses are completed, a total of 4 semester hours is recommended.

Location:
Length:

Independent study.

Dates:

May 1986 - October 1997.

Objectives:
Instruction:
Credit recommendation:

Credit recommendation: In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Strategic Management (10/92).

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