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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Active Learning Experiences - Camphill Academy

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in Active Learning Experiences - Camphill Academy

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Curative Education Program, Glenmoore, PA; Social Therapy Program, Copake, NY; Soquel, CA; N. Vancouver, BC; and instructor-led individual study at various locations across North America.
Length:
30 hours (across several weeks - varies).
Dates:
September 2004 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the concept of the sevenfold human being, explaining the manifestations of physical existence, life, astrality, and egohood in the human being; describe the content of the sevenfold human being, demonstrating an understanding of the transformation of the physical body, life body, and astral body to the spirit self, life spirit, and spirit body; explain the relationship between contemplative practices and an awareness of the transformative processes that occur in the sevenfold human being; discuss the philosophical basis for the concepts of human destiny and reincarnation; describe the conceptual basis for the discussion of the worlds of matter, soul, and spirit, and the interconnection of these three worlds.

Instruction:

This course provides an orientation to anthroposophical concepts of individual human existence. It provides a basic framework upon which contemplative, pedagogical, therapeutic, and diagnostic concepts of curative education and social therapy are built. This course is accompanied by a year-long introduction to human biographies, curative education/social therapy, and the human being, which further develop the basic themes presented. Topics covered include: the bodily nature, the soul nature, and the spirit nature of the human being; the philosophy of human destiny; the philosophical underpinnings of human reincarnation; the mineral world; the soul world; the spiritual world; the nature of being; overview of basic contemplative exercises, including the six-fold path, the eight-fold path, and self-observation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Curative Education, Social Therapy, Philosophy, Cognitive Studies, Consciousness Study, Contemplative Practice, Contemplative Spiritual Practice, Western Spirituality, and any discipline that could benefit from such a complementary learning experience (9/05) (10/10 revalidation) (11/15 revalidation).

Location:
Curative Education Program, Glenmoore, PA; Social Therapy Program, Copake, NY; Soquel, CA; N. Vancouver, BC; and instructor-led individual study at various locations across North America.
Length:
15 hours (variable - over several weeks).
Dates:
March 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the spiritual context of human communication and conflict; describe the nature of communication and conflict; describe one's own relationship to communication and conflict; use good speaking and listening skills; recognize the sources of conflict; describe the levels of conflict; describe how conflict escalates; describe how conflict de-escalates;  and describe the process of mediation.

Instruction:

Curative educators often work in organizations and institutions of a non-hierarchical nature. Such institutions encourage conflict and require high levels of communication between individuals. Conflict is viewed as a potentially health giving dynamic. The aim of this course is to give an introductory overview of how social processes can create healthy situations for conflict and transform damaging conflicts into individual and institutional growth. Topics covered include: Theoretical introduction to: the anthroposophical context of communication, speech and listening; hierarchical and non-hierarchical institutional structures and the role of conflict and communication in these structures; power - its nature, its purpose, its uses; conflict - the dehumanizing processes of conflict, the concept of the "double," transformational faces in conflict; types of conflict - destructive vs. constructive, hot vs. cold; the Karmic nature of conflict; the contexts of conflict - personal, interpersonal, within groups, between groups; identifying the subjective manifestations of conflict; identifying the objective causes of conflict - mechanisms of conflict, escalation levels, de-escalation, de-escalation roles - friends, witnesses, mediators; mediation - framework and agreements, methods of mediation, perception building tools, mediation tools, mediation processes, concluding mediation processes, reviewing mediation processes; the Inner Path as a training for the healthy management of conflict - the six exercises, the eightfold path, the role of sympathy and antipathy in generating conflict: empathy as the solution.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Curative Education, Communication Studies, Conflict Resolution, Psychology, Social Science, Organizational Development, Management Studies, Community Studies, and any discipline that could benefit from such a complementary learning experience (9/07) (10/10 revalidation) (11/15 revalidation).

Location:
Curative Education Program, Glenmoore, PA; Social Therapy Program, Copake, NY; Soquel, CA; N. Vancouver, BC; and instructor-led individual study at various locations across North America.
Length:
15 hours (variable - over several weeks).
Dates:
May 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: recognize and understand current social and political issues in their relevance to one's professional work; evaluate current socio-political trends and circumstances in light of considerations arising from an anthroposophic perspective; articulate one's professional approach, including the anthroposophic perspective in curative education, in ways that can be understood and appreciated by those unfamiliar with anthroposophy or curative education; enter into meaningful and constructive professional dialogue with perspectives other than one's own.

Instruction:
Curative educational work always takes place in the context of a current social and political situation. As a professional in the field of human services and developmental disabilities, curative educators need to be able to perceive and understand this social and political context in which their work takes places. This requires the ability to engage with current issues and enter into intelligent dialogue with others involved in this work. As anthroposophic practitioners, curative educators should bring a deepened perspective to such dialogue, being able to articulate their approach in a way that can be understood by others who are unfamiliar with anthroposophy and anthroposophic curative education. In turn, they must also develop the capacity to listen to, evaluate and appreciate what comes towards them from other perspectives and to work with it creatively and constructively. This course lays a foundation for such dialogue and engagement through a discussion of current articles on themes related to the field of curative educational work.
Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Curative Education, Special Education, Psychology, Disability Studies, Social Science, Human Services, Social Work, and any discipline that could benefit from such a complementary learning experience (9/07) (10/10 revalidation) (11/15 revalidation).

Location:
Social Therapy Program, Copake, NY; Soquel, CA; N. Vancouver, BC; and instructor-led individual study at various locations throughout North America.
Length:
300 hours over 10 months.
Dates:
September 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion, students will be able to: demonstrate punctuality, reliability, and a cooperative attitude toward work; fulfill their role and responsibilities as a member of the workshop team; provide support to individuals; assist in specific work activities; practice basic safety awareness; interact with adults with disabilities in a respectful and appropriate manner; assist in general workshop management and support of the physical well-being of participants; respond appropriately to social and behavioral issues; show interest in participants, their individual needs, and the nature of the workshop; and recognize their own limitations and ask for support when needed.

Instruction:

This is a mentored hands-on practicum consisting of supervised participation in a cooperative work situation with adults with special needs. Ongoing formative assessment based on learning goals in a learning agreement occurs during weekly mentoring meetings and includes a mid-year review with verbal and written qualitative feedback and student self-evaluation. A final review in the same format constitutes the summative assessment.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Social Therapy, Human Services, or Special Education (10/10) (11/15 revalidation).

Location:
Social Therapy Program, Copake, NY; Soquel, CA; N. Vancouver, BC; and instructor-led individual study at various locations across North America.
Length:
300 hours over 10 months.
Dates:
September 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion, students will be able to: implement instructions regarding workshop activities from their leader; independently assist participants with special needs through a work area; ensure the safety of the group; assist in general workshop management; communicate effectively with participants and with the workshop leader; and monitor and report participant engagement and performance.

Instruction:

This is a mentored hands-on practicum consisting of supervised participation in a cooperative work situation with adults with special needs. Ongoing formative assessment based on learning goals in a learning agreement occurs during weekly mentoring meetings and includes a mid-year review with verbal and written qualitative feedback and student self-evaluation. A final review in the same format constitutes the summative assessment.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Social Therapy, Human Services, or Special Education (10/10) (11/15 revalidation).

Location:

Social Therapy Program, Copake, NY; Soquel, CA; N. Vancouver, BC; and instructor-led individual study at various locations across North America.

Length:

300 hours over ten months. 

Dates:

September 2012 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion, students will be able to: safely manage a workshop independently; explore ways of accompanying the workplace meditatively; consider and develop ways to maintain and enliven the work life of participants, in close cooperation with the mentor; implement considerations arising from annual review reports with support from mentor; communicate with other workshop leaders, therapists, houseparents and participant regarding individual program and needs; plan, oversee and lead the program over an extended period of time with guidance and support from workshop leader; review and participate in the annual review process for each participant; participate in biography meetings and personal planning meetings, contributing significant observations; and reflect and assess the strenghts and weaknesses of ones own work. 

Instruction:

This practicum is integral to the third year social therapy curriculum and offers opportunities to practice social therapy in the context of living and working in a community including others with developmental disabilities. Concurrently, it complements coursework in Human Being III, Social Therapy II and Social Therapy Project III, as well as coursework in the arts. This course lays the foundation for work in the fourthy year, especially for Human Being IV, the Practicum concentration and Final Project. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Social Therapy, Human Services, or Special Education (11/15).

Location:
Curative Education Program, Glenmoore, PA.
Length:
15 hours (variable over several weeks).
Dates:
May 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the importance of the craft curriculum in the Waldorf high school and its relevance to the developmental stages of adolescents; explain the importance of the Camphill pre-vocational program in guiding adolescents with special needs; explain the importance of meaningful work gestures in the lives of adolescents and adults with special needs; describe the processes underlying development of craft and work skills (such as repetition and moving from simple to more complex); apply introductory skills in one particular area of craft work; and reflect on and describe processes involved in gaining this skill.

Instruction:

Students explore how and why curative educators guide school students through both a Waldorf oriented craft curriculum and a series of pre-vocational craft/work experiences that lead to adult capacities in the realm of work. They also explore the role of meaningful work gestures for high school students as they find their role in today's mechanized society and experience the power of crafts to develop the creative capacity of the will.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Curative Education, Special Education, Education, Waldorf Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, or Child/Adolescent Development or any discipline that could benefit from such a complementary learning experience (9/07) (10/10 revalidation) (11/15 revalidation).

Location:
Curative Education Program, Glenmoore, PA. .
Length:
15 hours
Dates:
September 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss Steiner's hierarchy of the arts and the role of arts in curative education; identify developmental levels expressed in children's drawings; present relevant art work in a child study/conference/class; apply therapeutic techniques in artistic disciplines; design and practice a curative artistic activity centered on insights gained in a child study; describe artistic content and expression as a reflection of the experience of the child; and use the arts for expanded understanding and diagnosis.

Instruction:

This course explores the therapeutic use of the visual and performing arts, integrated within the context of daily life. Practical exercise in curative artistic techniques which draw on a variety of artistic techniques from various disciplines, form the basis of the course. Students complete a written reflection and present an analysis of student work.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Curative Education, Education, Special Education, Waldorf Education, Art Therapy, and any discipline that could benefit from such a complementary learning experience (10/10) (11/15 revalidation).

Location:
Curative Education Program, Glenmoore, PA.
Length:
34 hours (variable - over several weeks); in addition, 7 hours of field experience.
Dates:
March 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the fundamentals of Waldorf education; give an overview of the Waldorf curriculum (K-1) in its relationship to key stages of child development; explain how Waldorf education is adapted for children with special needs; and demonstrate examples of sensory and developmental exercises and describe their effect.

Instruction:
During this course, students are given an overview of Waldorf education, its pedagogical, social, and spiritual-cultural mission and fundamental pedagogical principles. The course includes an overview of the curriculum from kindergarten through 12th grade. Throughout the course, special consideration is given to the application and adaptation of Waldorf education to the education of students with special needs, with an introduction to sensory and developmental exercises used in class-wide and individualized instruction. Students are required to complete one day of classroom observation in a Waldorf school for typically developing students.
Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Curative Education, Special Education, Education, Waldorf Education, Child Development or any discipline which could benefit from such a complementary learning experience (9/07) (10/10 revalidation) (11/15 revalidation). 

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