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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Active Learning Experiences - Camphill Academy

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in Active Learning Experiences - Camphill Academy

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Camphill Village, USA, Copake, NY; instructor-led individual study at various locations across North America.

Length:

30 hours (variable – over several weeks).

Dates:

September 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: observe a complex developmental situation and discover unresolved issues related to the developmental processes studied in their area of focus; articulate these issues in a clear and objective manner; give an imaginative characterization of a complex developmental situation as a meaningful developmental challenge; begin to develop capacities to be able to accompany developmental challenges; articulate what are the elements that need to be taken into account to organize the farm according to its fourfold beingness: mineral, plant, animal and human kingdom and their integration in the biodynamic farm, its correlation with the threefold human organization, the principle of an organism, a phenomenological point of view of the substances and processes of the preparations; articulate the history of agriculture and its relation to the development of consciousness. 

Instruction:

The human motif is the primal phenomenon that will guide us to understand this central principle coined by Rudolf Steiner in his Agriculture course as the farm individuality. We will introduce and explore this principle to inform our practices. Through this orientation, the farm’s parts are seen within an integrated contextual whole in which the farmer is asked to operate in a holistic and balanced approach.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Agriculture, Environmental Studies, Ecology, Philosophy (10/20). 

Location:
Camphill Communities California, Soquel, CA; The Camphill School, Glenmoore, PA; Camphill Village Kimberton Hills, Phoenixville, PA; Camphill Village, USA, Copake, NY; Heartbeet Lifesharing, Hardwick, VT; Plowshare Farm, Greenfield, NH; instructor-led
Length:

30 hours (variable – over several weeks).

Dates:
September 2004 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: gain appreciation and understanding of Steiner’s terminology, approach, and methodology fundamental to the study and practice of anthroposophy; develop familiarity with the concepts of the tripartite human being; explain the three modes of existence of the human being; apply the concepts of the nine-fold nature of the human being to individuals and to future biographical work; discuss the conceptual basis for the laws of destiny, karma and reincarnation; explain the conceptual basis of the worlds of soul and spirit, the forces that underlie these worlds and how these forces are a part of everyday human experience; discuss the basis for inner development through the lens of death and rebirth.

Instruction:

This course provides an orientation to anthroposophical concepts of individual human existence. It provides a basic framework upon which contemplative, pedagogical, therapeutic, and diagnostic concepts of curative education and social therapy are built. This course is accompanied by a year-long introduction to human biographies, inclusive social development, including aspects of curative education, social agricluture and biodnamics, and/or social therapy, and the human being, which further develop the basic themes presented. Topics covered include: the bodily nature, the soul nature, and the spirit nature of the human being; the philosophy of human destiny; the philosophical underpinnings of human reincarnation; the mineral world; the soul world; the spiritual world; the nature of being; overview of basic contemplative exercises, including the six-fold path, the eight-fold path, and self-observation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Curative Education, Social Therapy, Social Agriculture, Inclusive Social Development, Philosophy, Cognitive Studies, Consciousness Study, Contemplative Practice, Contemplative Spiritual Practice, Western Spirituality, and any discipline that could benefit from such a complementary learning experience (9/05) (10/10 revalidation) (11/15 revalidation) (10/20 revalidation).

Location:

The Camphill School, Glenmoore, PA; instructor-led individual study at various locations across North America.

Length:

30 hours (variable – over several weeks).

Dates:

September 2017 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate greater confidence in their (writing) voice; use semi-structured writing activities to focus and free their thoughts; differentiate between objective, subjective, and figurative descriptions; construct descriptive sentences which reflect a working understanding of English conventions, such as grammar, syntax, and punctuation; organize phrases, sentences, and paragraphs in a clear and meaningful way; make choices about structure, voice, tone, diction/word choice, style, and level of formality appropriate to the assignment and rhetorical situation; develop flexible strategies for generating ideas, revising, editing, and proofreading work; write with increasing credibility, courage, and awareness; support interpretations and reasoning with evidence from experiences, observations, and texts; participate in a group process of sharing, reading, and responding to works-in-progress based on the peer review and workshop model used in class; revise their work in response to peer and instructor feedback while maintaining their individual responsibility to what they know to be true and good; proofread to ensure work is properly formatted, syntactically and grammatically correct, and free of punctuation and spelling of errors; use electronic environments to draft, review, revise, edit, and share their written work; uphold academic honesty by properly incorporating and attributing other’s ideas and concepts in their work (i.e. direct quote, paraphrase, summary, in-text citation).

Instruction:

An introduction to the principles and practice of academic, artistic, and contemplative writing with an emphasis on Creative Nonfiction. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Curative Education, Inclusive Social Development, Creative Writing, Communicative Studies, or Writing (10/20).

Location:

Camphill Communities California, Soquel, CA; The Camphill School, Glenmoore, PA; Camphill Village Kimberton Hills, Phoenixville, PA; Camphill Village, USA, Copake, NY; Heartbeet Lifesharing, Hardwick, VT; Plowshare Farm, Greenfield, NH

Length:

375 hours (over 10 months).

Dates:

September 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: show openness to, interest in, and respect for the beliefs and practices of the community or group and for the dignity and individuality of each person (empathy); demonstrate flexibility, adaptability, and a cooperative attitude towards work; understand the purpose of the practical, social, educational, and/or therapeutic activities that they are asked to carry out (versatility); show an openness to artistic practice and the creative process; take up a regular practice; learn a few basic skills (creativity); show openness to suggestions and guidance for development; challenge themselves in new and unfamiliar ways (in relationship with each of the other goals) (self-initiative); demonstrate a willingness to engage with spiritually scientific concepts (active interest); show openness and willingness to work as a team member and to integrate socially; demonstrate an understanding of their role/responsibilities as a member of the team under the guidance of the team leader (cooperation); communicate with respect for all community members; show attention to detail; able to work within a structured framework; provide helpful and accurate reports and observations; carry a small group within the team and with guidance warmly and responsibility; aware of their area of study within a bigger context (vocational integrity); be responsive in providing appropriate support; report concerns to placement contact/lead; show basic safety awareness (personal care, health, and safety); participate in and support common celebrations and ceremonies (festival and celebrations); carry responsibility for designated tasks; carry awareness for small group of designated persons and/or work space; reliably clean and care for the space  (awareness for the space and community); begin to recognize how they could adapt their approach to meet other people where they are; recognize how various community activities have distinct qualities (social artistry); Attempt to make objective observations of practical situations; become aware of their inner and outer reactions to practical situations. familiar with some basic anthroposophic tools for inner development but still have little experience with meditative and contemplative practices (contemplative practice).

Instruction:

This practicum provides students opportunities to concentrate on developing practical competency in tasks related to homemaking and community building, including care for individuals, groups, and the environment. The practicum may take place in any context that allows students to demonstrate their capacity to apply and integrate in daily life concepts, skills and dispositions related to the practicum objectives. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Curative Education, Social Therapy, Social Agriculture, Inclusive Social Development, Social Work, Education, Special Education, Ecology (10/20).

Location:

Camphill Communities California, Soquel, CA; The Camphill School, Glenmoore, PA; Camphill Village Kimberton Hills, Phoenixville, PA; Camphill Village, USA, Copake, NY; Heartbeet Lifesharing, Hardwick, VT; Plowshare Farm, Greenfield, NH

Length:

375 hours (over 10 months).

Dates:

September 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: accompany others, in an active and supportive way, to cultural or religious events and activities that are different from their own (empathy); develop a flexible, adaptable, and cooperative attitude in all areas of life and work and understand the nature and purpose of practical, social, educational, and/or therapeutic activities on the basis of the spiritual scientific view of the human being (versatility); develop a regular artistic practice as a means of self-development and articulate its benefit; accompany others, in an active and supportive way, in artistic endeavors; expand their range of skills (creativity); reflect on and assess the strengths and weaknesses of their own work in conversation with their advisors, supervisors, instructors, colleagues, and mentors, and trusted colleagues (self-initiative); develop an understanding of themselves, others, and the environment through a deepening study of anthroposophy and the human being (active interest); take initiative out of a recognition of what is needed to meet the extraordinary or non-routine needs; work through and resolve social difficulties with others and unforeseen situations; accompany less experienced team members reliably (cooperation); observe significant aspects of an individual’s performance, a group’s interactions, and/or an activity’s effect and demonstrate an ability to listen and communicate effectively; complete formal written and oral reports in a professional manner with support; complete formal written and oral reports in a professional manner with guidance; carry a small group within the team warmly and responsibility; understand their activity within the context of their work (vocational integrity); be reliable and assist others with minor, common illnesses, injuries, and issues; explain the purpose of any medication, supplements and remedies; report anything unusual to team leader; support and help orient newcomers (personal care, health, and safety); be actively involved in festivity preparations and events; develop an understanding of the value of celebration in community life (festivals and celebrations); extend awareness for areas beyond their designated areas of responsibility; help orient newcomers to the daily rhythms and community; recognize areas that need attention (awareness for the space and community); adapt, explore and use different approaches to meet individual needs and preferences; understand and strive to enter into the distinctive quality of various activities (social artistry); observe how external conditions and their inner attitude can impact individuals and situations; explore the value of meditative content in practical settings, engage with structured meditative and contemplative practices, including anthroposophic ones (contemplative practice).

Instruction:

Building on ‘Care and Community Practicum I’,  this practicum provides students an opportunity to develop a broader range of tools and capacities in tasks related to homemaking and community building, including care for individuals, groups, and the environment. The practicum may take place in any context that allows students to demonstrate their capacity to apply and integrate in daily life concepts, skills and dispositions related to the practicum objectives. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Curative Education, Social Therapy, Social Agriculture, Inclusive Social Development, Social Work, Education, Special Education, Ecology (10/20).

Location:

Camphill Communities California, Soquel, CA; The Camphill School, Glenmoore, PA; Camphill Village Kimberton Hills, Phoenixville, PA; Camphill Village, USA, Copake, NY; Heartbeet Lifesharing, Hardwick, VT; Plowshare Farm, Greenfield, NH

Length:

375 hours (over 10 months).

Dates:

September 2019 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explore your personal relationship to the ideals and practices of the community or group (empathy); recognize the effects of curative or social therapeutic exercises and activities; participate in co-creating a curative or social therapeutic atmosphere; take an active role in the development and evaluation of formal and informal practical, social, educational, and/or therapeutic plans based on the principles of anthroposophic curative education, social therapy, or other relevant field (versatility); continue to refine your ideas of the role of artistic processes in your own development and engage in some systematic practices on that basis; broaden and deepen your range of skills and influence (creativity); recognize and pursue opportunities to develop particular capacities in yourself based on a practice of self-discipline, objective self-assessment, and self-education (self-initiative); relate and apply your understanding and experience of anthroposophy with your work and your relationships, perceive clearly, free from personal judgment (active interest); take active responsibility within your team and beyond; effectively communicate with a diverse group of individuals regarding an individual’s or group’s program and needs; support all members in working through social difficulties; take an active role in conflict resolution; help facilitate group processes, including orienting new team members and adapting processes based on individual needs (cooperation); give guidance and supervision to newcomers regarding routine activity, in consultation with your team leader; assist the leader in carrying groups; complete formal written and oral reports in a professional manner with relative independence; engage with new developments and trends in the field (vocational integrity); be responsible to carry oversight of others’ needs; maintain ongoing awareness; recognize potentially harmful or extraordinary situations and take initiative and action; instruct and supervise less experienced team members (personal care, health, and safety); carry an awareness and understanding of various festivals, such as when they occur and their significance, especially major ones; participate in the planning of festivals (festivals and celebrations); carry awareness and significant responsibility for the space; support others, including less experienced coworkers, in caring for and maintaining the space; replace team leaders as needed (awareness for the space and community); expand your ability to approach social situations creatively depending on individual needs and preferences; explore ways of helping others experience the distinctive quality of various activities (social artistry); explore ways of accompanying a small group of individuals or community processes meditatively in consultation with your team leader; use structured meditative and contemplative tools, including anthroposophic ones, in my ongoing personal and professional development (contemplative practice).

Instruction:

Building on the experience of the first two years, this practicum provides students opportunities to take on greater responsibility, acting as significant support to their supervisor and beginning to share in the functions and responsibilities in tasks related to homemaking and community building, including care for individuals, groups, and the environment.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Curative Education, Social Therapy, Social Agriculture, Inclusive Social Development, Social Work, Education, Special Education, Ecology (10/20).

Location:
Camphill Communities California, Soquel, CA; The Camphill School, Glenmoore, PA; Camphill Village Kimberton Hills, Phoenixville, PA; Camphill Village, USA, Copake, NY; Heartbeet Lifesharing, Hardwick, VT; Plowshare Farm, Greenfield, NH; instructor-led ind
Length:
15 hours (variable - over several weeks).
Dates:
March 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand how social processes can create and support healthy situations for conflicts and conflict resolution processes and thereby transform damaging conflicts into individual and institutional growth; discuss the spiritual and historical context of communication and conflict; examine the nature of communication and conflict; articulate one’s personal relationship to communication and conflict; use improved speaking, listening, and mediation skills; begin to recognize the sources of conflict; explain the levels of conflict, how conflict escalates, how conflict de-escalates; describe the process of mediation; recognize the sources of conflict.

Instruction:

Practictioners of inclusive social development often work in organizations and institutions of a non-hierarchical nature. Such institutions encourage conflict and require high levels of communication between individuals. Conflict is viewed as a potentially health giving dynamic. The aim of this course is to give an introductory overview of how social processes can create healthy situations for conflict and transform damaging conflicts into individual and institutional growth. Topics covered include: Theoretical introduction to: the anthroposophical context of communication, speech and listening; hierarchical and non-hierarchical institutional structures and the role of conflict and communication in these structures; power - its nature, its purpose, its uses; conflict - the dehumanizing processes of conflict, the concept of the "double," transformational faces in conflict; types of conflict - destructive vs. constructive, hot vs. cold; the Karmic nature of conflict; the contexts of conflict - personal, interpersonal, within groups, between groups; identifying the subjective manifestations of conflict; identifying the objective causes of conflict - mechanisms of conflict, escalation levels, de-escalation, de-escalation roles - friends, witnesses, mediators; mediation - framework and agreements, methods of mediation, perception building tools, mediation tools, mediation processes, concluding mediation processes, reviewing mediation processes; the Inner Path as a training for the healthy management of conflict - the six exercises, the eightfold path, the role of sympathy and antipathy in generating conflict: empathy as the solution.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Curative Education, Communication Studies, Conflict Resolution, Psychology, Social Science, Social Therapy, Social Agriculture, Inclusive Social Development, Organizational Development, Management Studies, Community Studies, and any discipline that could benefit from such a complementary learning experience (9/07) (10/10 revalidation) (11/15 revalidation) (10/20 revalidation).

Location:
Camphill Communities California, Soquel, CA; The Camphill School, Glenmoore, PA; Camphill Village Kimberton Hills, Phoenixville, PA; Camphill Village, USA, Copake, NY; Heartbeet Lifesharing, Hardwick, VT; Plowshare Farm, Greenfield, NH; instructor-led ind
Length:
15 hours (variable - over several weeks).
Dates:
May 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: recognize and discuss current social and political issues in their relevance to their professional work; evaluate current socio-political trends and circumstances in the light of considerations arising from an anthroposophically expanded, ethical and transdisciplinary perspective; articulate their professional approach, including the anthroposophic perspective, in a way that can be understood and appreciated by those unfamiliar with anthroposophy; enter into meaningful and constructive professional dialogue with perspectives other than one’s own; develop the capacity to listen to, evaluate and appreciate what comes towards them from other perspectives, and to work with it creatively and constructively.

Instruction:

Inclusive social development work always takes place in the context of a current social and political situation. In the field of human services and developmental disabilities, professionals need to be able to perceive and understand this social and political context in which their work takes places. This requires the ability to engage with current issues and enter into intelligent dialogue with others involved in this work. As anthroposophic practitioners, they should bring a deepened perspective to such dialogue, being able to articulate their approach in a way that can be understood by others who are unfamiliar with anthroposophy and anthroposophic curative education. In turn, they must also develop the capacity to listen to, evaluate and appreciate what comes towards them from other perspectives and to work with it creatively and constructively. This course lays a foundation for such dialogue and engagement through a discussion of current articles on themes related to the field of inclusive social development work.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Curative Education, Special Education, Psychology, Disability Studies, Social Science, Human Services, Social Work, Social Therapy, Social Agriculture, Inclusive Social Development, and any discipline that could benefit from such a complementary learning experience (9/07) (10/10 revalidation) (11/15 revalidation) (10/20 revalidation).

Location:
The Camphill School, Glenmoore, PA; instructor-led individual study at various locations across North America.
Length:
15 hours (variable over several weeks).
Dates:
May 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: the will and of the importance of craft and work in the unfolding of new capacities in the adolescent; consider questions of the morality of craft and work and questions relating to manual work and meaningful work gestures in a mechanized society; discuss why curative educators guide school students through both a Waldorf oriented craft curriculum and a series of pre-vocational craft/work experiences that lead to adult capacities in the realm of work; through the practice of one particular craft, experience the design process, building up of technical skills, understanding basic processes and structures of a craft and how practical skills build from simple to more complex processes; describe aspects of the importance of the craft curriculum in the Waldorf High school and its relevance to the developmental stages of the adolescent; explain the importance of the Camphill pre-vocational and transition programs in guiding adolescents with developmental disabilities; describe some of the processes underlying the development of craft and work skills; demonstrate introductory skills in one particular area of craft work; reflect on and describe processes involved in gaining  this skill; reflect on how these processes can underlie craft/work skills for people with disabilities.

Instruction:

Students explore how and why curative educators guide school students through both a Waldorf oriented craft curriculum and a series of pre-vocational craft/work experiences that lead to adult capacities in the realm of work. They also explore the role of meaningful work gestures for high school students as they find their role in today's mechanized society and experience the power of crafts to develop the creative capacity of the will.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Inclusive Social Development, Curative Education, Special Education, Education, Waldorf Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, or Child/Adolescent Development or any discipline that could benefit from such a complementary learning experience (9/07) (10/10 revalidation) (11/15 revalidation) (10/20 revalidation).

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