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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Liability

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Independent Study program administered through the offices of the American Educational Institute.
Length:
Approximately 18 hours of structured independent study.
Dates:
May 2004 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to recognize the importance of using negotiation, mediation, arbitration and other ADR (Alternative Dispute Resolution) methods in resolving disputed claims.

Instruction:

Major topics are: negotiation, mediation, arbitration and hybrid disputes resolution procedures. In addition to the AEI produced textbook, students receive actual court decisions, which relate to the subject matter and present real-life court opinions that illustrate how courts have ruled in the past and are likely to rule in the future on important issues in claims. A proctored examination is administered for both levels of the credit recommendation. Scenario and case study-based questions, built around actual claims situations, challenge students to analyze and solve problems using applicable principles of claims law that parallel their own claim files. To broaden students' knowledge of the subject, graded exams are returned with helpful comments that provide a written explanation of why each answer is correct or incorrect. For the graduate level credit recommendation, students also prepare and submit an appropriate graduate level research project on a pre-approved topic or issue, in accordance with AEI's specific guidelines.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category OR in the graduate degree category, 1 semester hour in Alternative Dispute Resolution, Insurance, Insurance Law or Business Law (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 221 and 222 constitute 2 semester hours in Dispute Resolution and Settlement.

Location:
Independent Study program administered through the offices of the American Educational Institute.
Length:
Approximately 16 hours of structured independent study.
Dates:
May 2004 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the concept of comparative negligence as used in tort law; analyze the various forms of comparative negligence and determine applicability of state law; discuss the three theories of comparative negligence and their application to a dollar and cents evaluation of claims; and evaluate the effect of contracts, indemnity, strict or absolute liability, joint and several liability, contribution among joint tort feasors, products liability, subrogation and other areas.

Instruction:

Major topics are: various forms of comparative negligence; effect of comparative negligence on statutory and common law doctrines and defenses; changes in joint and several liability, settlement, set-off and conflict of law problems. In addition to the AEI produced textbook, students receive actual court decisions, which relate to the subject matter and present real-life court opinions that illustrate how courts have ruled in the past and are likely to rule in the future on important issues in claims. A proctored examination is administered for both levels of the credit recommendation. Scenario and case study-based questions, built around actual claims situations, challenge students to analyze and solve problems using applicable principles of claims law that parallel their own claim files. To broaden students' knowledge of the subject, graded exams are returned with helpful comments that provide a written explanation of why each answer is correct or incorrect. For the graduate level credit recommendation, students also prepare and submit an appropriate graduate level research project on a pre-approved topic or issue, in accordance with AEI's specific guidelines.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category OR in the graduate degree category, 1 semester hour in Comparative Negligence or Insurance Law or Business Law (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: This course is also listed under the Law of Automobile Claims and Coverage Section. Credit should only be awarded once.

Location:
Independent Study program administered through the offices of the American Educational Institute.
Length:
Approximately 18 hours of structured independent study.
Dates:
May 2004 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to discuss statutory employment issues; discuss common law employment issues; and identify insurance issues involving employment claims.

Instruction:

Major topics are: statutory and common law liability theories and defenses; and insurance coverage issues in employment claims. In addition to the AEI produced textbook, students receive actual court decisions, which relate to the subject matter and present real-life court opinions that illustrate how courts have ruled in the past and are likely to rule in the future on important issues in claims. A proctored examination is administered for both levels of the credit recommendation. Scenario and case study-based questions, built around actual claims situations, challenge students to analyze and solve problems using applicable principles of claims law that parallel their own claim files. To broaden students' knowledge of the subject, graded exams are returned with helpful comments that provide a written explanation of why each answer is correct or incorrect. For the graduate level credit recommendation, students also prepare and submit an appropriate graduate level research project on a pre-approved topic or issue, in accordance with AEI's specific guidelines.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category OR in the graduate degree category, 1 semester hour in Employment Law, Business Law or Labor Law (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 212 and 223 constitute 2 semester hours in Professional Employment Liability. NOTE: Courses 218, 219, and 223 constitute 3 semester hours in Professional Liability.

Location:

Independent Study program administered through the offices of the American Educational Institute.

Length:

Approximately 15 hours of structured independent study.

Dates:

May 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the insurer's duty of good faith and fair dealing toward its insured in the context of property and casualty insurance claims; discuss how the insurer can discharge this duty in the course of handling property and casualty insurance claims; dicuss the requirements of state statutes governing insurance claims handling; and discuss the insurer's duty to investigate and pay first party claims and its duty to defend and settle third party claims.

Instruction:

Major topics include: the duty of good faith that arises from the insurance policy; the statute of limitations in bad faith actions; the scope of discovery in bad faith actions; the insurer's duty of good faith in first party and third party claims.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree / associate degree OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Insurance, Insurance Law, Investigations, or Corporate and Professional Liability (5/15).

Location:
Independent Study program administered through the offices of the American Educational Institute.
Length:
Approximately 19 hours of structured independent study.
Dates:
May 2004 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to discuss current environmental law, both statutory and case law, and its interplay with liability and property coverage issues and identify environmental issues as they arise and develop effective strategies to deal with them.

Instruction:

Major topics are: theories of environmental liability and recoverable damages, exclusions; first party property coverage issues; and environmental statutes. In addition to the AEI produced textbook, students receive actual court decisions, which relate to the subject matter and present real-life court opinions that illustrate how courts have ruled in the past and are likely to rule in the future on important issues in claims. A proctored examination is administered for both levels of the credit recommendation. Scenario and case study-based questions, built around actual claims situations, challenge students to analyze and solve problems using applicable principles of claims law that parallel their own claim files. To broaden students' knowledge of the subject, graded exams are returned with helpful comments that provide a written explanation of why each answer is correct or incorrect. For the graduate level credit recommendation, students also prepare and submit an appropriate graduate level research project on a pre-approved topic or issue, in accordance with AEI's specific guidelines.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category OR in the graduate degree category, 1 semester hour in Environmental Law, Insurance, Insurance Law or Business Law (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 220 and 221 constitute 2 semester hours in Environmental Liability. NOTE: Courses 221 and 222 constitute 2 semester hours in Dispute Resolution and Settlement.

Location:
Independent Study program administered through the offices of the American Educational Institute.
Length:
Approximately 18 hours of structured independent study.
Dates:
May 2004 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the rules of evidence; discuss the admissibility of evidence at trial by applying the common law and the Federal Rules of Evidence; and discuss the possibilities inherent in any evidence situation.

Instruction:

Major topics are: admissibility of evidence at trial, strength and weakness of defenses based on admissibility of available evidence; Federal Rules of Evidence. In addition to the AEI produced textbook, students receive actual court decisions, which relate to the subject matter and present real-life court opinions that illustrate how courts have ruled in the past and are likely to rule in the future on important issues in claims. A proctored examination is administered for both levels of the credit recommendation. Scenario and case study-based questions, built around actual claims situations, challenge students to analyze and solve problems using applicable principles of claims law that parallel their own claim files. To broaden students' knowledge of the subject, graded exams are returned with helpful comments that provide a written explanation of why each answer is correct or incorrect. For the graduate level credit recommendation, students also prepare and submit an appropriate graduate level research project on a pre-approved topic or issue, in accordance with AEI's specific guidelines.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category OR in the graduate degree category, 1 semester hour in Evidence or Insurance Law or Business Law (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 212 and 223 constitute 2 semester hours in Professional Employment Liability.

Location:
Independent Study program administered through the offices of the American Educational Institute.
Length:
Approximately 21 hours of structured independent study.
Dates:
May 2004 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the court interpretation of basic general liability policy language; understand coverage issues such as punitive damages, wrongful termination and sexual misconduct; understand important policy exclusions, such as the intentional acts exclusion and the work product exclusion; and understand policy conditions and the duties of both insured and insurer once a loss has occurred, including the insurer's duty to investigate, defend and settle and ways to avoid allegations of bad faith.

Instruction:

Major topics are: duty to investigate, settle or defend; and exclusions, bad faith, policy defenses and limits of liability. In addition to the AEI produced textbook, students receive actual court decisions, which relate to the subject matter and present real-life court opinions that illustrate how courts have ruled in the past and are likely to rule in the future on important issues in claims. A proctored examination is administered for both levels of the credit recommendation. Scenario and case study-based questions, built around actual claims situations, challenge students to analyze and solve problems using applicable principles of claims law that parallel their own claim files. To broaden students' knowledge of the subject, graded exams are returned with helpful comments that provide a written explanation of why each answer is correct or incorrect. For the graduate level credit recommendation, students also prepare and submit an appropriate graduate level research project on a pre-approved topic or issue, in accordance with AEI's specific guidelines.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category OR in the graduate degree category, 1 semester hour in General Liability, Insurance, Insurance Law or Business Law (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

Location:
Independent Study program administered through the offices of the American Educational Institute.
Length:
Approximately 15 hours of structured independent study.
Dates:
May 2004 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss insurance coverages including public liability, employer's liability, and workers compensation, as well as fidelity and surety bonds; explain the basic concepts of insurance law needed to understand third party coverages as they are interpreted in the courts; discuss the liability insurance policy and its common policy provisions; and discuss the rights and duties of both the insured and insurer under a liability insurance policy.

Instruction:

Major topics are: fundamental principles of liability insurance and the insurance contract liability policy conditions; the rationale of various courts deciding issues of coverage; the insured's duty of cooperation and the insurer's duties to defend and settle; requirements of unfair claims practices statutes and liability for bad faith. In addition to the AEI produced textbook, students receive actual court decisions, which relate to the subject matter and present real-life court opinions that illustrate how courts have ruled in the past and are likely to rule in the future on important issues in claims. A proctored examination is administered for both levels of the credit recommendation. Scenario and case study-based questions, built around actual claims situations, challenge students to analyze and solve problems using applicable principles of claims law that parallel their own claim files. To broaden students' knowledge of the subject, graded exams are returned with helpful comments that provide a written explanation of why each answer is correct or incorrect. For the graduate level credit recommendation, students also prepare and submit an appropriate graduate level research project on a pre-approved topic or issue, in accordance with AEI's specific guidelines.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category OR in the graduate degree category, 1 semester hour in Liability Insurance or Insurance Law or Business Law (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

Location:
Independent Study program administered through the offices of the American Educational Institute.
Length:
Approximately 16 hours of structured independent study.
Dates:
May 2004 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: recognize and discuss theories of liability in order to investigate, negotiate and settle medical malpractice claims; recognize the theories of liability which may be asserted against various health care providers; discuss elements of those theories to develop an effective strategy for investigation, negotiation and settlement of medical malpractice claims; and discuss and utilize court decisions and statutes affecting insurance claims.

Instruction:

Major topics are: rights and liabilities of physicians, nurses, hospitals, nursing homes and pharmacists; standards of care, methods of proving deviation from that standard and defenses. In addition to the AEI produced textbook, students receive actual court decisions, which relate to the subject matter and present real-life court opinions that illustrate how courts have ruled in the past and are likely to rule in the future on important issues in claims. A proctored examination is administered for both levels of the credit recommendation. Scenario and case study-based questions, built around actual claims situations, challenge students to analyze and solve problems using applicable principles of claims law that parallel their own claim files. To broaden students' knowledge of the subject, graded exams are returned with helpful comments that provide a written explanation of why each answer is correct or incorrect. For the graduate level credit recommendation, students also prepare and submit an appropriate graduate level research project on a pre-approved topic or issue, in accordance with AEI's specific guidelines.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category OR in the graduate degree category, 1 semester hour in Insurance Law or Professional Liability Insurance or Insurance (5/10) (5/15 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 218, 219, and 223 constitute 3 semester hours in Professional Liability.

Location:
Independent Study program administered through the offices of the American Educational Institute.
Length:
Approximately 15 hours of structured independent study.
Dates:
May 2004 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss personal and advertising injury coverage in general liability insurance policies; identify and analyze claims issues arising out of personal and advertising injury coverage; and discuss and apply court decisions interpreting personal and advertising injury coverage.

Instruction:

Major topics are: false arrest; malicious prosecution; defamation; advertising offenses, such as copyright infringement. In addition to the AEI produced textbook, students receive actual court decisions, which relate to the subject matter and present real-life court opinions that illustrate how courts have ruled in the past and are likely to rule in the future on important issues in claims. In addition to the AEI produced textbook, students receive actual court decisions, which relate to the subject matter and present real-life court opinions that illustrate how courts have ruled in the past and are likely to rule in the future on important issues in claims. A proctored examination is administered for both levels of the credit recommendation. Scenario and case study-based questions, built around actual claims situations, challenge students to analyze and solve problems using applicable principles of claims law that parallel their own claim files. To broaden students' knowledge of the subject, graded exams are returned with helpful comments that provide a written explanation of why each answer is correct or incorrect. For the graduate level credit recommendation, students also prepare and submit an appropriate graduate level research project on a pre-approved topic or issue, in accordance with AEI's specific guidelines.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category OR in the graduate degree category, 1 semester hour in Insurance or Business Law (5/10) (5/15 revalidation).

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