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Yeshivas Toras Moshe - Talmud-Inactive Courses

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in Yeshivas Toras Moshe - Talmud-Inactive Courses

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Formerly:
Talmud Bava Basra I [Talmud 119, 219, 319, 419]
Location:
Toras Moshe, Jerusalem, Israel.
Length:
195 hours (26 weeks); in addition 734 hours of supervised study.
Dates:

August 1998 - December 2015.

Objectives:

Talmud 154a: Students will be able to: discuss the substance and essence of the talmudic text of the first two chapters of Bava Basra; apply analytical skills in talmudic explication; follow the dynamics of talmudic argumentation leading to halakhic conclusions and resolutions; focusing primarily on the commentaries of Rashi and Tosafos, utilize the major medieval, modern, and contemporary commentaries to comprehend the underlying assumptions and consequences of the legal principles implicit in the text. Talmud 254a or 354a: In addition to the above outcomes, students will be able to utilize in a more complete fashion the full range of commentaries in the understanding of the text. Talmud 454a: In addition to the above outcomes, analyze the abstract legal concepts implicit in the talmudic text and its commentaries; formulate abstract legal categories based on the talmudic text.

Instruction:

Talmud 154a: The first two chapters of Tractate Bava Basra, dealing primarily with the laws pertaining to rights and obligations of owners of neighboring property, are addressed. Students prepare the applicable talmudic texts as well as the major halakhic opinions of various rishonim and acharonim, including Rashi, Tosafos, and the other commentaries as assigned by the instructor. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised, and assists the student to deduce and elucidate the crux of these issues. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, discussion of the major relevant halakhic topics. Talmud 254a or 354a: In addition to the above, students are introduced to techniques in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Talmud 454a: In addition to the above, students are expected to achieve proficiency in techniques of advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Topics include: details of the laws of damage consequent to invasion of privacy; rights and obligations of owners of neighboring property; limitation of each neighbor on his rights to normal usage of his property where such usage causes either direct or indirect damage to his neighbor's property; rights of each neighbor to use the other's property where such usage does not damage the other's property; laws of non-physical damage; dissolution of partnerships in a chatzer or other areas which are not properly divisible; paying for benefit received; details of laws regarding repayment of short term loans; collection of note of heirs; mutual obligations of those who live together; laws of charity; various stages in the development of the educational system; unfair competition; firing without prior warning. NOTE: Students in all four courses study the same course materials. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study and nature of analysis depends upon which course the student is enrolled in.

Credit recommendation:

Talmud 154a: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 12 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 254a or 354a: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 12 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 454a: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 12 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion or in the graduate category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (1/00). NOTE: Credit should only be awarded once for Talmud 154a, 254a, 354a, or 454a at the undergraduate degree level; however, credit can be awarded for Talmud 154a, 254a, or 354a at the undergraduate degree level and Talmud 454a at the graduate degree level.

Formerly:
Talmud Bava Basra II [Talmud 120, 220, 320, 420]
Location:
Toras Moshe, Jerusalem, Israel.
Length:
81 hours (26 weeks); in addition 312 hours of supervised study.
Dates:

August 1998 - December 2015.

Objectives:

Talmud 154b: Students will be able to: discuss the substance and essence of the talmudic text of the second half of the eighth chapter of Bava Basra; apply analytical skills in talmudic explication; follow the dynamics of talmudic argumentation leading to halakhic conclusions and resolutions, focusing primarily on the commentaries of Rashi and Tosafos; utilize the major medieval, modern, and contemporary commentaries to comprehend the underlying assumptions and consequences of the legal principles implicit in the text. Talmud 254b or 354b: In addition to the above outcomes, students will be able to utilize in a more complete fashion the full range of commentaries in the understanding of the text. Talmud 454b: In addition to the above outcomes, students will be able to analyze the abstract legal concepts implicit in the talmudic text and its commentaries; formulate abstract legal categories based on the talmudic text.

Instruction:

Talmud 154b: The second half of the eighth chapter of Bava Basra, dealing primarily with the various means available to bequeath an inheritance to potential heirs, is addressed. Students prepare the applicable talmudic texts as well as the major halakhic opinions of various rishonim and acharonim, including Rashi, Tosafos, and the other commentaries as assigned by the instructor. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised, and assists them in deducing and elucidating the crux of these issues. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, discussion of the major relevant halakhic topics. Talmud 254b or 354b: In addition to the above, students are introduced to techniques in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Talmud 454b: In addition to the above, students are expected to achieve proficiency in techniques of advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Topics include: a general picture of inheritance issues; the types of property from which the first born takes a double portion of inheritance, relinquishing rights to inheritance before the death of the father; disinheritance of potential heir; issues regarding indeterminate gender; credibility of father in determining first born; use of oaths in determining truth in a court; and  the inability to effect a subsequent possession following an inheritance. NOTE: Students in all four courses study the same course materials. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study and nature of analysis depends upon which course the student is enrolled in.

Credit recommendation:

Talmud 154b: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 5 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 254b or 354b: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 454b: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category; 5 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion or in the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (1/00). NOTE: Credit should only be awarded once for Talmud 154b, 254b, 354b, or 454b at the undergraduate degree level; however, credit can be awarded for Talmud 154b, 254b, or 354b at the undergraduate degree level and Talmud 454b at the graduate degree level.

Location:
Toras Moshe, Jerusalem, Israel.
Length:
195 hours (26 weeks); in addition, 734 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:

August 2006 - December 2015.

Objectives:

Talmud 167a: Students will be able to: discuss the substance and essence of the talmudic text of the beginning of the third chapter of Bava Basra; apply analytical skills in talmudic explication; follow the dynamics of talmudic argumentation leading to halakhic conclusions and resolutions; focusing primarily on the commentaries of Rashi and Tosafos, also utilizing the major medieval, modern, and contemporary commentaries to comprehend the underlying assumptions and consequences of the legal principles implicit in the text.Talmud 267a: In addition to the above outcomes, utilized in a more complete fashion the students are introduced to the full range of commentary in the understanding of the text. In addition, students are introduced to techniques in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Talmud 467a: In addition to the above outcomes, focus in a more total sense on analysis of the abstract legal concepts implicit in the talmudic text and range of commentaries, and formulate abstract legal categories based on the above talmudic text. Students are expected to achieve proficiency in techniques of advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries.

Instruction:

Students read and study the relevant section of tractate Bava Basra employing the major standard commentaries. Instruction and peer study involve the above chapters dealing with the laws pertaining to Bava Basra. NOTE: All students study these chapters in a given term. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study and nature of analysis depends upon what year of study the student is in.

Credit recommendation:

Talmud 167a: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 12 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 267a: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 12 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 467a: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 12 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion or in the graduate category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/08). NOTE: Credit should only be awarded once for Talmud 167a, 267a, or 467a at the undergraduate degree level; however, credit can be awarded for Talmud 167a or 267a at the undergraduate degree level and Talmud 467a at the graduate degree level.

Location:
Toras Moshe, Jerusalem, Israel
Length:

81 hours (26 weeks); in addition 312 hours of supervised study.

Dates:

August 2006 - December 2015.

Objectives:

Talmud 167b: Students will be able to: discuss the substance and essence of the talmudic text of the end of the third chapter of Bava Basra; apply analytical skills in talmudic explication; follow the dynamics of talmudic argumentation leading to halakhic conclusions and resolutions, focusing primarily on the commentaries of Rashi and Tosafos, also utilizing the major medieval, modern, and contemporary commentaries to comprehend the underlying assumptions and consequences of the legal principles implicit in the text. Talmud 267b, Talmud 367b: In addition to the above outcomes, utilized in a more complete fashion, students are introduced to the full range of commentary in the understanding of the text. In addition, students are introduced to techniques in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. The difference between the two levels is in the focus on conceptual development. As students become more adept at textual mastery, the focus changes more to conceptual development.

Instruction:

Students are expected to prepare the applicable talmudic texts as well as the major halakhic opinions of various rishonim and acharonim, including Rashi, Tosafos, and the other commentaries as assigned by the instructor. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised, and assists students in deducing and elucidating the crux of these issues. Instruction includes, but it not be limited to, discussion of the major relevant halakhic topics. Instruction and peer study involve the above chapters dealing with the laws pertaining to property rights, such as chozokoh, liens, real estate theft, marital disputes concerning land as well as aspects of kinyanim and court procedures. NOTE: All students study the same chapters in a given term. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study and nature of analysis depends upon what year of study the student is in.

Credit recommendation:
Talmud 167b: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 5 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 267b or 367b:In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/08).
Location:
Toras Moshe, Jerusalem, Israel.
Length:
78 hours (26 weeks); in addition 312 hours of supervised study.
Dates:

August 2001 - December 2007.

Objectives:

Students will be able to: discuss the substance and essence of the talmudic text of the ninth chapter of Bava Kama; apply analytical skills in talmudic explication; follow the dynamics of talmudic argumentation leading to halakhic conclusions and resolutions, focusing primarily on the commentaries of Rashi and Tosafos; utilize in a complete fashion, the full range of major medieval, modern, and contemporary commentaries to comprehend the underlying assumptions and consequences of the legal principles implicit in the text.

Instruction:

The ninth chapter of Bava Kama is addressed, dealing primarily with the laws pertaining to the liability of a thief, the effects theft has on ownership and related issues of theft and indirect damages. Students prepare the applicable talmudic texts as well as the major halakhic opinions of various rishonim and acharonim, including Rashi, Tosafos, and the other commentaries as assigned by the instructor. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised, and assists them in deducing and elucidating the crux of these issues. In addition, students are introduced to advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, discussion of the major relevant halakhic topics. Topics include: analysis of the effect theft has on ownership; laws of an apotiki; hezek sh'ayno nikar; indirect forms of damage; chiuv hashava; theft of land and avodim; tainis ganav; and takanos hashavim.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/02). NOTE: Credit should only be awarded once for Talmud 158b, 258b, 358b, 458b (undergraduate level credit recommendation) or 358c. Credit can be awarded for Talmud 358c and Talmud 458b at the graduate degree level.

Formerly:
Talmud Bava Kama III [Talmud 141, 241, 341, 441]
Location:
Toras Moshe, Jerusalem, Israel.
Length:
94 hours (13 weeks); in addition, 367 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:
April 1997 - June 2005.
Objectives:

Talmud 152d: Students will be able to: discuss the substance and essence of the talmudic text of the sixth chapter and parallel parts of the second chapter of Bava Kama; apply analytical skills in talmudic explication; follow the dynamics of talmudic argumentation leading to halakhic conclusions and resolutions, focusing primarily on the commentaries of Rashi and Tosafos, utilize the major medieval, modern, and contemporary commentaries to comprehend the underlying assumptions and consequences of the legal principles implicit in the text. Talmud 252d or 352d: In addition to the above outcomes, utilize in a more complete fashion the full range of commentaries in the understanding of the text. Talmud 452d: In addition to the above outcomes, analyze the abstract legal concepts implicit in the talmudic text and its commentaries; formulate abstract legal categories based on the talmudic text.

Instruction:

Talmud 152d: Major topics include: the sixth chapter and parallel parts of the second chapter of Bava Kama, dealing primarily with the laws pertaining to damage by animals, fire, and indirect damage by human beings, are addressed. Students prepare the applicable talmudic texts as well as the major halakhic opinions of various rishonim and acharonim, including Rashi, Tosafos, and the other commentaries as assigned by the instructor. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised, and assists them in deducing and elucidating the crux of these issues. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, discussion of the major relevant halakhic topics. Talmud 252d or 352d: In addition to the above, students are introduced to techniques in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Talmud 452d: In addition to the above, students are expected to achieve proficiency in techniques of advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Topics include: proper forms of watching potentially dangerous property; liability for different forms of direct and indirect damage; damage by fire and animals; liability by bailees for damage done by watched object; obligation of bailee to return objects and consequent liability issues; payment for unintentional benefit received; where such benefit is not direct but rather preventing of loss. NOTE: Students in all four courses study the same course materials. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study and nature of analysis depends upon which course the student is enrolled in.

Credit recommendation:

Talmud 152d: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 252d or 352d: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 452d: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion or in the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (1/00). NOTE: Credit should only be awarded once for Talmud 152d, 252d, 352d, or 452d at the undergraduate degree level; however, credit can be awarded for Talmud 152d, 252d, or 352d at the undergraduate degree level and Talmud 452d at the graduate degree level.

Formerly:
Talmud Bava Kama IV [Talmud 142, 242, 342, 442]
Location:
Toras Moshe, Jerusalem, Israel.
Length:
42 hours (13 weeks); in addition, 156 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:
April 1997 - June 2005.
Objectives:

Talmud 152e: Students will be able to: discuss the substance and essence of the talmudic text of the eighth chapter of Bava Kama; apply analytical skills in talmudic explication; follow the dynamics of talmudic argumentation leading to halakhic conclusions and resolutions; focusing primarily on the commentaries of Rashi and Tosafos, utilize the major medieval, modern, and contemporary commentaries to comprehend the underlying assumptions and consequences of the legal principles implicit in the text. Talmud 252e or 352e: In addition to the above outcomes, utilize in a more complete fashion the full range of commentaries in the understanding of the text. Talmud 452e: In addition to the above outcomes, analyze the abstract legal concepts implicit in the talmudic text and its commentaries and formulate abstract legal categories based on the talmudic text.

Instruction:

Talmud 152e: Major topics include: the eighth chapter of Bava Metzia, dealing primarily with the laws pertaining to torts especially in the case of bodily damage by one human being to another, is addressed.Students  prepare the applicable talmudic texts as well as the major halakhic opinions of various rishonim and acharonim, including Rashi, Tosafos, and the other commentaries as assigned by the instructor. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised, and assists them in deducing and elucidating the crux of these issues. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, discussion of the major relevant halakhic topics. Talmud 252e or 352e: In addition to the above, students are introduced to techniques in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Talmud 452e: In addition to the above, students are expected to achieve proficiency in techniques of advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Topics include: bodily damage done by one human being to another and consequent liability; authority of various courts to sit on these issues; details of reimbursement for medical costs; loss of wages; ways of calculating the liability for damage; pain and suffering; psychological suffering; damage to minors; disqualification of witnesses; damage by minors; kinyan peiros; someone who gives permission to be damaged; liability for watching charity funds. NOTE: Students in all four courses study the same course materials. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study and nature of analysis depends upon which course the student is enrolled in.

Credit recommendation:

Talmud 152e:In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 252e or 352e: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 452e: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion or in the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (1/00). NOTE: Credit should only be awarded once for Talmud 152e, 252e, 352e, or 452e at the undergraduate degree level; however, credit can be awarded for Talmud 152e, 252e, or 352e at the undergraduate degree level and Talmud 452e at the graduate degree level.

Location:
Toras Moshe, Jerusalem, Israel.
Length:
195 hours (26 weeks); in addition, 734 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:

August 2007 - December 2015.

Objectives:

Talmud 169a: Students will be able to: discuss the substance and essence of the talmudic text of the third, fourth, and fifth chapters of Bava Kama; apply analytical skills in talmudic explication; follow the dynamics of talmudic argumentation leading to halakhic conclusions and resolutions; focus primarily on the commentaries of Rashi and Tosafos, utilizing also the major medieval, modern, and contemporary commentaries to comprehend the underlying assumptions and consequences of the legal principles implicit in the text.Talmud 269a: In addition to the above outcomes, utilized in a more complete fashion, students are introduced to the full range of commentary in the understanding of the text. In addition, students are introduced to techniques in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Talmud 469a: In addition to the above outcomes, focus in a more total sense on analysis of the abstract legal concepts implicit in the talmudic text and range of commentaries, and formulate abstract legal categories based on the above talmudic text. Students are expected to achieve proficiency in techniques of advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries.

Instruction:

Students read and study the relevant section of tractate Bava Kama employing the major standard commentaries. Instruction and peer study involve the above chapters dealing with the laws pertaining to Bava Kama. NOTE: All students study these chapters in a given term. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study and nature of analysis depends upon what year of study the student is in.

Credit recommendation:

Talmud 169a: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 12 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 269a: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 12 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 469a: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 12 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion or in the graduate category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (9/08). NOTE: Credit should only be awarded once for Talmud 169a, 269a, or 469a at the undergraduate degree level; however, credit can be awarded for Talmud 169a or 269a at the undergraduate degree level and Talmud 469a at the graduate degree level.

Location:
Toras Moshe, Jerusalem, Israel.
Length:
195 hours (26 weeks); in addition, 734 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:

August 2001 - December 2011.

Objectives:

Talmud 158a: Students will be able to: discuss the substance and essence of the talmudic text of the seventh chapter of Bava Kama; apply analytical skills in talmudic explication; follow the dynamics of talmudic argumentation leading to halakhic conclusions and resolutions, focusing primarily on the commentaries of Rashi and Tosafos, utilize the major medieval, modern, and contemporary commentaries to comprehend the underlying assumptions and consequences of the legal principles implicit in the text. Talmud 258a or 358a: In addition to the above outcomes, utilized in a more complete fashion, students are introduced to the full range of commentary in the understanding of the text. In addition, students are introduced to techniques in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. The difference between the two levels is in the focus on conceptual development. As students become more adept at textual mastery the focus changes more to conceptual development. Talmud 458a: In addition to the above outcomes, analyze the abstract legal concepts implicit in the talmudic text and its commentaries; formulate abstract legal categories based on the talmudic text.

Instruction:

Talmud 158a: Major topics include: the seventh chapter of Bava Kama is addressed, dealing primarily with the laws pertaining to theft, the financial obligations and liabilities involved, and their effect on ownership and how these changes come about. Students prepare the applicable talmudic texts as well as the major halakhic opinions of various rishonim and acharonim, including Rashi, Tosafos, and the other commentaries as assigned by the instructor. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised, and assists them in deducing and elucidating the crux of these issues. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, discussion of the major relevant halakhic topics. Talmud 258a or 358a: In addition to the above, students are introduced to techniques in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Talmud 458a: In addition to the above, students are expected to achieve proficiency in techniques of advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Topics include: the fundamental legal issues of theft; the transfer of ownership involved; the obligation to pay for damaged or unreturned stolen goods; fines and returning of stolen goods; kafel, daled v'heh and keren; chiuv hashava; elements of reshus; ownership and its transference; and various forms of kinyanei geneiva. NOTE: Students in all four courses study the same course materials. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study and nature of analysis depends upon which course the student is enrolled in.

Credit recommendation:

Talmud 158a: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 12 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 258a or 358a: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 12 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 458a: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 12 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion or in the graduate category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/02). NOTE: Credit should only be awarded once for Talmud 158a, 258a, 358a, or 458a at the undergraduate degree level; however, credit can be awarded for Talmud 158a, 258a, or 358a at the undergraduate degree level and Talmud 458a at the graduate degree level.

Location:
Toras Moshe, Jerusalem, Israel.
Length:
81 hours (26 weeks); in addition, 312 hours of supervised peer study.
Dates:
August 2001 - December 2011.
Objectives:

Talmud 158b: Students will be able to: discuss the substance and essence of the talmudic text of the ninth chapter of Bava Kama; apply analytical skills in talmudic explication; follow the dynamics of talmudic argumentation leading to halakhic conclusions and resolutions, focusing primarily on the commentaries of Rashi and Tosafos, utilize the major medieval, modern, and contemporary commentaries to comprehend the underlying assumptions and consequences of the legal principles implicit in the text. Talmud 258b or 358b: In addition to the above outcomes, utilized in a more complete fashion, students are introduced to the full range of commentaries in the understanding of the text. In addition, students are introduced to techniques in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. The difference between the two levels is in the focus on conceptual development. As students become more adept at textual mastery the focus changes more to conceptual development. Talmud 458b: In addition to the above outcomes, students analyze the abstract legal concepts implicit in the talmudic text and its commentaries and formulate abstract legal categories based on the talmudic text.

Instruction:

Talmud 158b: Major topics include: the ninth chapter of Bava Kama is addressed, dealing primarily with the laws pertaining to liability of a thief, the effect that theft has on ownership and related issues of theft and indirect damages. Students prepare the applicable talmudic texts as well as the major halakhic opinions of various rishonim and acharonim, including Rashi, Tosafos, and the other commentaries as assigned by the instructor. The instructor guides students in understanding the issues raised, and assists them in deducing and elucidating the crux of these issues. Instruction includes, but is not limited to, discussion of the major relevant halakhic topics. Talmud 258b or 358b: In addition to the above, students are introduced to techniques in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Talmud 458b: In addition to the above, students are expected to achieve proficiency in techniques of advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries. Topics include: various issues of theft, including takanas hashavim, kinyanei geneiva and baalos of the ganav; issues of reshus and ownership; issues of the theft of avodim, chiuv hashava and tainis ganav apotike, hezek sh'eino nikar and indirect forms of damage. NOTE: Students in all four courses study the same course materials. While the scope of instruction is the same, the depth of study and nature of analysis depends upon which course the student is enrolled in.

Credit recommendation:
Talmud 158b: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 5 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 258b or 358b: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion. Talmud 458b: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion or in the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/02). NOTE: Credit should only be awarded once for Talmud 158b, 258b, 358b, or 458b at the undergraduate degree level; however, credit can be awarded for Talmud 158b, 258b, or 358b at the undergraduate degree level and Talmud 458b at the graduate degree level.

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