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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Talmud Studies - Torah Accreditation Liaison

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offered as a proficiency examination or self-study format.

Dates:
March 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

In addition to the Elementary and Intermediate objectives, students are required to: define machlokes, Svara's strengths and weaknesses of different approaches, formulate abstract legal categories, display a proficiency in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries, extracting principles and evaluate the relationship between parts of the legal discussion. The difference between the Advanced I and Advanced II exams is found in the difficulty of the commentaries assigned, self-preparation of a previously unseen Gemara and its commentaries and complexity of the subjects being analyzed.

Instruction:

Proficiency exam: The examination is intended to measure a body of knowledge that candidates have acquired through prior learning experiences. Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials. Emphasis is placed on comprehension of the Talmudic text with all commentaries and an advanced level ability to comprehend the Talmudic dialogue and display advanced conceptualization of Talmudic text and commentaries.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06) (3/12 administrative review) (5/19 revalidation). NOTE: Advanced Talmud 1 (Talmud 301) can be repeated multiple times as long as the Chapters are different. (For example, Talmud 301 Bava Basra Chapter 1 does not overlap with Talmud 301 Bava Basra Chapter 3). 

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offered as a proficiency examination or self-study format.  

Dates:
August 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

In addition to the Elementary, Intermediate, and Advanced Talmud I objectives, students are required to independently study a section of the Babylonian Talmud with the entire community with an emphasis on the medieval and later commentaries and be able to: define machlokes, Svara's, strengths and weaknesses of different approaches, formulate abstract legal categories, display a proficiency in advanced conceptualization of talmudic text and commentaries, extracting principles and evaluate the relationship between parts of the legal discussion. The difference between the Advanced I and Advanced II exams is found in the difficulty of the commentaries assigned, self-preparation of a previously unseen Gemara and its commentaries and complexity of the subjects being analyzed.

Instruction:

Proficiency exam: The examination is intended to measure a body of knowledge and skills that candidates have acquired through prior learning experiences. Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials.  Emphasis is placed on comprehension of the Talmudic text with all commentaries and an advanced level ability to comprehend the Talmudic dialogue and display advanced conceptualization of Talmudic text and commentaries.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/06) (3/12 administrative review) (5/19 revalidation).

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offfered as a proficiency examination or self-study format.  

Dates:
March 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

Students are required to read, translate, and explain four folios of the Babylonian Talmud with the basic Rashis; be familiar with basic outside information such as identifying the parts on a dof (Mishna, Gemara, Rashi); apply basic background information (historical information, basic rules such as the authority of the Mishna versus the Gemara, etc.); read Rashi script, basic acronyms, explain Aramaic grammar and vocabulary; apply talmudic legal expressions and terminology; and identify types of statements, information, questions, attack questions, answers to attack questions, logical proofs, etc.

Instruction:

Proficiency exam: The examination is intended to measure a body of knowledge that candidates have acquired through prior learning experiences. Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials. Emphasis is placed on correct reading and comprehension of the Talmudic text with basic Rashis, a vocabulary of Talmudic terms and idioms and an ability to comprehend the Talmudic dialogue.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06) (3/12 administrative review) (5/19 revalidation). 

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offered as a proficiency examination or self-study format.

Dates:
August 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

In addition to the Elementary I Talmud objectives, students are required to read and comprehend five folios of the Babylonian Talmud with all Rashi's (excluding Tosafos style Rashi's); use the reference system (ain mishpat, mesoros hashas); identify and translate all acronyms found on the page; and translate and employ a higher level vocabulary, expressions, rules and patterns found in the Talmudic text.

Instruction:

Proficiency exam: The examination is intended to measure a body of knowledge that candidates have acquired through prior learning experiences. Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials.  Emphasis is placed on correct reading and comprehension of the Talmudic text with intermediate level Rashi's, a vocabulary of Talmudic terms and idioms and an ability to comprehend the Talmudic dialogue.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/06) (3/12 administrative review) (5/19 revalidation).

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offered as a proficiency examination or self-study format. 

Dates:
March 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

In addition to the Elementary Talmud objectives, students are required to read and discuss six to eight folios of the Babylonian Talmud with the entire commentary of Rashi and basic Tosafos translation, including all Aramaic and Hebrew vocabulary, expressions, rules and patterns, including the catch phrases and patterns unique to Tosafos (im tomar, yesh lomar, ode yesh lomar, etc.); apply analytical skills in Talmudic explication; follow the dynamics of talmudic argumentation leading to halakhic conclusions and resolutions; utilizing Rashi and Tosafos to articulate the underlying assumptions and consequences of the legal principles implicit in the text.

Instruction:

Proficiency exam: The examination is intended to measure a body of knowledge that candidates have acquired through prior learning experiences.  Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials. Emphasis is placed on correct reading and comprehension of the Talmudic text with all Rashis' and basic Tosafos and an intermediate level ability to comprehend the Talmudic dialogue and display intermediate conceptualization of Talmudic text and commentaries.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (5/06) (3/12 administrative review) (5/19 revalidation). NOTE: Intermediate Talmud I (Talmud 201) can be repeated multiple times as long as the Chapters are different. (For example, Talmud 201 Bava Basra Chapter 1 does not overlap with Talmud 201 Bava Basra Chapter 3).

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offered as a proficiency examination or self-study format.  

Dates:
August 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

In addition to the Elementary and Intermediate I Talmud objectives, students are required to read and discuss eight to ten folios of the Babylonian Talmud with the entire commentary of Rashi and entire range of Tosafos'; comprehension: display the ability to compare the subject at hand with other sugia's, identify the points of conflict and follow Tosafos' process and reasoning in resolving apparent contradictions; utilizing Rashi and Tosafos to articulate the underlying assumptions and consequences of the legal principles implicit in the text.

Instruction:

Proficiency exam: The examination is intended to measure a body of knowledge that candidates have acquired through prior learning experiences. Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials. Emphasis is placed on correct reading and comprehension of the Talmudic text with all Rashis' and all Tosafos' and an intermediate level ability to comprehend the Talmudic dialogue and display intermediate conceptualization of Talmudic text and commentaries.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Jurisprudence, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/06) (3/12 revalidation) (5/19 revalidation). NOTE: Intermediate Talmud II (Talmud 202) can be repeated multiple times as long as the Chapters are different. (For example, Talmud 202 Bava Basra Chapter 1 does not overlap with Talmud 202 Bava Basra Chapter 3).

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