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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Inactive Learning Experiences - Saylor Academy

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Various locations throughout the United States and the world.
Length:
132 hours.
Dates:

October 2011 - January 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to identify sources of law in the United States; describe the function and role of courts in the U.S. legal system; differentiate litigation from methods of alternative dispute resolution, and discuss the process of each; list the elements of the major torts; list the essential elements of a valid contract; describe how a contract can fail; summarize the remedies available for breach of contract; distinguish between real and personal property; identify the various interests in real property and how they pass; identify the requirements to hold various rights under intellectual property laws; analyze the impact of the digital era on intellectual property rights; distinguish between at-will employment and contractual employment; identify laws that generally regulate the employer-employee relationship; identify criminal acts related to the business world; define and identify examples of white collar crime; describe the various forms of business organization; identify the major laws regulating business in the United States; identify major ethical concerns in business today; distinguish between Aristotle's ethical theory, utilitarianism, and Kant's ethical theory; distinguish Aristotle and Kant's ethical theories, and utilitarianism, from cultural relativism and nihilism; and analyze case studies that illustrate ethical dilemmas in business ethics.

Instruction:
This course is delivered in an open, asynchronous, self-study format with a proctored proficiency examination. View the course here: http://www.saylor.org/courses/bus205/ .
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business (11/12).

Location:
Various locations throughout the United States and the world.
Length:
130 hours.
Dates:

December 2012 - January 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: calculate or estimate limits of functions given by formulas, graphs, or tables by using properties of limits and L'Hopial's Rule; state whether a function given by a graph or formula is continuous or differentiable at at given point or on a given interval and justify the answer; calculate average and instantaneous rates of change in context and state the meaning and units of the derivative for functions given graphically; calculate derivatives of polynomial, rational, and common transcendental functions, compositions thereof, and implicitly defined functions; apply the ideas and techniques of derivatives to solve maximum and minimum problems and related rate problems and calculate slopes and rates for functions given as parametric equations; find extreme values of modeling functions given by formulas or graphs; predict, construct, and interpret the shapes of graphs; solve equations using Newton's method; find linear approximations to functions using differentials; verbally restate the meanings of the solutions to applied problems, attaching the appropriate units to the answers; state which parts of a mathematical statement are assumptions, such as hypotheses and which parts are conclusions; find anti-derivatives by changing variables and using tables; and calculate definite integrals.

Instruction:

This course is delivered in an open, asynchronous, self-study format with a proctored proficiency examination. View the course here: http://www.saylor.org/courses/ma005/.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Calculus or Mathematics (11/13).

Location:
Various locations throughout the United States and the world.
Length:
119 hours.
Dates:

August 2011 - January 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain why effective communication is important in a corporate environment; apply theories and observations of verbal communication to real-world communication challenges; use information about perceptions to analyze themselves and also the audiences to which businesses distribute messages; critique common formats of written business communication by recognizing standard and nonstandard elements in examples of each format; create business presentations that use verbal and nonverbal communication techniques effectively; recognize the importance of intrapersonal and interpersonal communication in business environments; recognize the impact of cultural differences on effective communication and understand the steps to becoming acculturated for international assignments; prepare a crisis communication plan and know how to give and receive negative news; use an understanding of groups, teams, and leadership to explain how to solve problems and run productive meetings.

Instruction:
This course is delivered in an asynchronous, self-study format with a proctored proficiency examination. View the course here: http://www.saylor.org/courses/bus210/.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business (11/12).

Location:
Various locations throughout the United States and the world.
Length:
128 hours.
Dates:

November 2012 - January 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: summarize the passage of political thought through the classical, Renaissance, and Enlightenment periods and based on the works of Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and Marx; compare and contrast the differences between Plato and Aristotle with regard to their understandings of the nature of the person, ethics, society, citizenship, and governance; explain the historical and intellectual context in which the political thought that helped to develop the modern state came to be; compare and contrast the concepts of justice, freedom, equality, citizenship, and sovereignty in the works of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau; explain the different versions of, and importance of, "the state of nature" to political thought; identify the influences of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau on the development of the United States Constitution; summarize the thoughts of Alexis de Tocqueville on the American political landscape, particularly with regard to religion and equality, and why this has importance beyond the American context; explain Karl Marx's world view, with particular regard to his critique of democracy and the modern, politically liberal state; how it came to be; and its fundamental link to capitalism; explain John Stuart Mill's theory on utilitarianism and how he applies it to society and the state.

Instruction:
This course is delivered in an asynchronous, self-study format with a proctored proficiency examination. View the course here: http://www.saylor.org/courses/polsc201/.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Political Theory (11/12).

Location:
Various locations throughout the United States and the world.
Length:
106 hours.
Dates:

May 2011 - January 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the roles and responsibilities of managers; discuss and analyze the purpose of management; identify the significance of how historical theories have shaped management; describe and assess the effect or globalization on operating, growing, and managing a business; explain the importance of corporate culture in the business environment; assess the impact of a culturally diverse workforce on businesses; identify ethical practices in business; apply the essential principles of quality leadership; identify and apply necessary skills for implementing effective management decision-making and strategic management planning; discuss the importance of effectively managing teams in the workplace and identify the roles teams play; analyze the importance of effective teamwork as it relates to productivity; assess the impacts of conflict in the workplace; identify ways to attract, hire, and retain high-quality employees; examine the importance of developing clearly identified goals and objectives; distinguish ways in which organizational structure impacts strategy, performance, and operations; analyze the significance of properly planning and executing change in an organization; and determine ways in which technology can be used to advance an organization.

Instruction:
This course is delivered in an asynchronous, self-study format with a proctored proficiency examination. View the course here: http://www.saylor.org/courses/bus208/.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management or Business (11/13).

Location:
Various locations throughout the United States and the world.
Length:
128 hours.
Dates:

March 2011 - January 2019.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define marketing and explain its function in society; explain the difference between marketing, advertising, and sales; describe marketing concepts and terminology; describe the process of market research; explain pricing, product strategy, including the product life cycle, positioning, and pricing; define competition and explain competitive analysis; analyze the process of distribution and explain marketing channels; identify key elements of product promotions; explain how to develop a marketing plan and apply principles of marketing in creating a marketing plan; and outline employment and career development opportunities in marketing.

Instruction:
This course is delivered in an asynchronous, self-study format with a proctored proficiency examination. View the course here: http://www.saylor.org/courses/bus203/.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Marketing or Business (11/13).

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