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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Government and Civics - LawShelf Educational Media

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Various (self-study, self-paced).

Dates:

June 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: Describe the three functions federal agencies generally perform; Define “enabling act” and explain its significance in administrative law; Articulate the procedures employed by administrative agencies and the due process limitations on what these agencies may do; Explain the process of administrative rulemaking and the procedures by which an agency adopts new rules; Describe the extent to which people can sue administrative actors in their capacities as agents of state and federal governments.

Instruction:

This course covers how federal agencies are created, the scope of their authorities, and the processes by which they are required to operate under the Administrative Procedures Act. It covers the establishing, delegating and running of administrative agencies which clarify, enforce, and sometimes even adjudicate federal law.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Legal Environment or Paralegal Studies (6/21).

Length:

Version 1 and 2: Various (self-study, self-paced).

Dates:

Version 1: June 2021 - November 2021. Version 2: December 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: Differentiate between the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and the Endangered Species Act; Articulate how these laws are administered by the Environmental Protection Agency; Describe how the Clean Air Act has played a critical role in improving and maintaining air quality nationwide; Describe the common law foundation for environmental actions based on trespass, public nuisance, private nuisance, and strict liability; Explain how the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act form the backbone of our nation’s system of environmental protection; Explain how anti—SLAPP (Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation,) laws protect people who file lawsuits against big companies for environmental and other injuries.

Instruction:

Version 1: This course takes the student through the federal laws and regulations that seek to protect our environment. It discusses landmark legislation such as the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Endangered Species Act, as well as how these laws are administered by the Environmental Protection Agency. Version 2: Same as version 1 with expanded academic readings and assessments including case studies.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Introduction to Environmental Law, Environmental Studies and Environmental Protection (6/21). Version 2:  In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Environmental Law, Environmental Studies, Environmental Science, or Environmental Protection (11/21 administrative review). 

Length:

Various (self-study, self-paced).

Dates:

June 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: Explain the structure of US immigration law and the continuing economic and social forces that affect it; Discuss the roles of the different branches of government and why immigration law is almost exclusively in the federal sphere; Identify and describe the federal statutes that govern immigration law; Describe how U.S. immigration law impacts immigrants who seek to enter the country on a temporary basis; Explain how foreign nationals who seek to come to the United States on a legal immigrant basis can do so under the provisions of US immigration laws; Describe how lawful permanent residents can become US citizens through the process of naturalization.

Instruction:

This course is a survey of immigration law. The course will discuss the meaning and ramification of different categories of immigration status including: illegal entrants, legal non-immigrant entrants, lawful permanent residents, and naturalized citizens.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate / certificate degree category, 2 semester hours in Homeland Security, or Legal Technology (6/21). 

Length:

Various (self-study, self-paced).

Dates:

June 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: Explain what the Model Rules of Professional Conduct are and why they are the most important source of the rules governing lawyers across the country; Analyze the attorney-client relationship, how it is formed, and the duties attorneys owe to their clients; Describe the attorney’s duties to each of: the court, the opposing parties, other unrepresented parties, and nonparties to the litigation; Utilize the conflict of interest rules to recognize situations that could cause conflicting loyalties; Navigate the ethical issues related to the business of law. Articulate ethical versus non-ethical practices relating to: advertising, soliciting clients, fee structures, and fee-splitting between attorneys and between attorneys and non-attorneys.

Instruction:

This course looks at the responsibilities of legal professionals to defend their clients and to preserve the integrity of the justice system. While the course is mainly based on rules applicable to attorneys, non-attorney legal professionals who work with attorneys are also indirectly bound by them. A non-attorney misfeasance can bring severe consequences for supervising attorneys and organizations.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate /certificate degree category, 2 semester hours in Legal Ethics, Business Ethics, or Philosophy of Ethics (6/21).

Length:

Various (self-study, self-paced).

Dates:

June 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: Differentiate among levels of scrutiny a court will employ when dealing with a discriminatory law or government action; Articulate the difference between the 14th Amendment’s Due Process Clause and Equal Protection Clause; Distinguish between the 5th Amendment’s Due Process Clause and the 14th Amendment’s Due Process and Equal Protection Clauses; Discuss the federal protections against religious discrimination; Use the Supreme Court’s three-factor test to consider whether a federal statute grants a claimant an enforceable right for a Section 1983 action.

Instruction:

This course focuses on the rights of all Americans under the federal and state Constitutions and laws. The course surveys the framework of these rights and goes into many specifics, including the rights to equal protection, due process, and freedom of religion. The course also touches on some other fundamental rights, including rights under the First Amendment.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate, 2 semester hours in Constitutional Law, Civil Liberties, or Criminal Justice (6/21).

Length:

Various (self-study, self-paced).

Dates:

December 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:  Explain the ways in which government may regulate speech; Examine the categories of protected speech such as political, religious, artistic, and hate speech, and explain why these types of speech are protected under the First Amendment; Discuss how and why the Supreme Court has determined that certain categories of speech such as, incitement, fighting words and obscenity, are deemed unprotected; Explain the allowable restrictions on political speech and protest; Differentiate between the Free Exercise Clause and the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment; Discuss the differences between religious beliefs and religious practices, and how the law regulates them differently; Articulate the three principles that guide the assessment of the constitutionality of laws or actions allegedly infringing on the free exercise clause. 

Instruction:

This course focuses on the freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment to the US Constitution, including freedoms of religion, speech, press, assembly and petition. The course covers when those freedoms can be limited and under what circumstances. It also focuses on the “establishment of religion” clause, which prohibits the government from “establishing” a national religion and the “free exercise” clause that prevents the government from prohibiting the free exercise of religion.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Civil Rights or Civil Liberties (6/21) (11/21 administrative review). 

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