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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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English - Davar Academy

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced).

Dates:

November 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: use appropriate grammar and syntax in written compositions; describe the attributes of description, narration, illustration, classification, compare/contrast methods, and analyses as they pertain to effective writing; develop a logical argument to address a topic; develop a detailed outline in preparation for writing an essay; write a coherent, persuasive paper that effectively supports a chosen argument; utilize feedback to refine an argument and presentation; and conform to accepted rules pertaining to attribution of sources, format, and other related policies in academic writing.

Instruction:

The course empowers students to be able to express their thoughts and opinions in and organized and structured manner.  Emphasis is on using standard English grammar in writing sentences and paragraphs in addition to using critical reading and thinking as tools in the writing process.  Major topics include: standard writing strategies such as thesis statements, topic sentences, and narrative and descriptive paragraph development for a variety of topics, the principles of plagiarism and source documentation using the MLA format are covered. The course includes a final exam and requires students to compose a variety of essay types including: narrative, descriptive, expository, persuasive, and a research essay.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English (11/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced).

Dates:

November 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: interpret literary texts, discussing themes and conflicts; express personal ideas and opinions about these texts; identify and assess any cultural, political, or philosophical intents of the author; write clearly and effectively through analysis of different modes and models of literature; write essays using various rhetorical modes and expository approaches such as comparison/contrast and argumentation; identify the theme of a literary piece as well as other literary elements; effectively read a piece of literature and analyze its components in order to write a thoughtful analytical essay of that particular piece; address opposing viewpoints using evidence from the text itself as supports; write and in-depth research paper on a piece of literature, stating a thesis and supporting it with evidence from the text itself as well as other written sources about that piece or author; and recognize various forms of plagiarism and be able to use the MLA format and its specific requirements for citing references.

Instruction:

This course further develops students’ ability to organize and express their thoughts through formal essays based on in-depth readings and fundamental analysis of selected pieces of literature.  Students learn to distinguish between literal and figurative meanings and learn to look for thematic cultural or political underpinnings.  Instruction focuses on how to accurately develop literary interpretations based on critical readings of fiction and poetry.  This self-study course is writing-intensive in which students compose five expository essays.  The final writing assignment is a research paper in which students are expected to find existing critical interpretations of the literary piece they have chosen and then compare these interpretations with their own.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English (11/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced).

Dates:

November 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: access, evaluate and use information in an academic or work environment; develop research questions and efficiently research and find relevant information by using library resources as well as other sources; access information electronically and be able to identify information gleaned from the World Wide Web; organize information in a manner that maximizes its utility for future reference and use; apply methods of organizing verbal and visual information and be able to select appropriate methods by which to evaluate and organize information; understand how privacy and security need to be protected and be familiar with the various intellectual property rights that protect information; and understand academic integrity and learn how to create appropriately formatted citations and bibliographies.

Instruction:

The course covers the skills necessary to be information-literate with respect to today’s technology. The course of study necessary to be prepared for the proctored proficiency examination consists of lessons based on the readings from the textbook. Students are encouraged to answer all the review questions and quizzes for each chapter.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in English (11/16).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies (self-study, self-paced).

Dates:

November 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: plan and prepare speeches that inform, persuade, or fulfill the needs of a special occasion; use presentation aids to enhance your speeches; outline speeches in a logical and thorough fashion; conduct meaningful research on a variety of topics; analyze the audience and design speeches to reflect analysis; evaluate speeches based on a variety of verbal and non-verbal criteria; listen effectively, regardless of individual interest in the subject matter; and explain and utilize the communication process.

Instruction:

This course is an introduction to public speaking which emphasizes the practical skills necessary for speaking in public, including techniques to lessen speaker anxiety and the use of visual aids to enhance speaker presentations.  Civility and ethical speech-making are emphasized.  The goal is to prepare students for success in typical public speaking situations and to provide them with the basic principles of organization and research needed for effective speeches. The course of study necessary to be prepared for the proctored proficiency examination consists of lessons based on the readings from the textbook.  Students are encouraged to answer all the review questions and quizzes for each chapter.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English (11/16).

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