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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Bible Studies - Theological Research Institute

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Self study, self-paced.

Dates:

July 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to; analyze and discuss the Book of Genesis and the major themes within; describe the key lessons demonstrated by the leading characters of the narrative; offer deeper explanation of the text using input from a variety of classical and modern commentaries with a focus on Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi); and develop and apply needed skills and techniques to illustrate an understanding of the Biblical text.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the Book of Genesis alongside an application of classical and modern commentaries, with a focus on the commentary by Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi). Students focus on topics that include but are not limited to the following themes; the creation narrative; the formation of the people of Israel via Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; and the purpose of the Egyptian exile. Prerequisite: Students need a basic understanding of the Hebrew Language.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biblical Studies, History, or as a general elective (7/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

July 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze and discuss the Book of Exodus and the major themes within; describe the key lessons demonstrated by the leading characters of the narrative; offer deeper explanation of the text using input from a variety of classical and modern commentaries with a focus on Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi); and develop and apply needed skills and techniques to illustrate an understanding of the Biblical text.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the Book of Exodus alongside an application of classical and modern commentaries, with a focus on the commentary by Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi). Students focus on topics that include but are not limited to the following themes; the Egyptian exile; the rise of Moses; the 10 plagues and the Exodus; and the Sinai experience. Prerequisite: Students need a basic understanding of the Hebrew Language.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biblical Studies, History, or as a general elective (7/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Self study, self-paced.

Dates:

July 2018 - Present.  

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze and discuss the Book of Leviticus and the major themes within; describe the key lessons demonstrated by the leading characters of the narrative; offer deeper explanation of the text using input from a variety of classical and modern commentaries with a focus on Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi); and develop and apply needed skills and techniques to illustrate an understanding of the Biblical text.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the Book of Leviticus alongside an application of classical and modern commentaries, with a focus on the commentary by Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi). Students focus on topics that include but are not limited to the following themes: Temple ritual; the laws of purity; and the lineages of the priesthood. Prerequisite: Students need a basic understanding of the Hebrew Language.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biblical Studies, History, or as a general elective (7/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Self study, self-paced. 

Dates:

July 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze and discuss the Book of Numbers and the major themes within; describe the key lessons demonstrated by the leading characters of the narrative; offer deeper explanation of the text using input from a variety of classical and modern commentaries with a focus on Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi); and develop and apply needed skills and techniques to illustrate an understanding of the Biblical text.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the Book of Numbers alongside an application of classical and modern commentaries, with a focus on the commentary by Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi). Students focus on topics that include but not limited to the following themes; the Laws of Moses; the relationship between The Creator and the people of Israel; and the mechanisms of faithfulness. Prerequisite: Students need a basic understanding of the Hebrew Language.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biblical Studies, History, or as a general elective (7/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Self study, self-paced.

Dates:

July 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze and discuss the Book of Deuteronomy and the major themes within; describe the key lessons demonstrated by the leading characters of the narrative; offer deeper explanation of the text using input from a variety of classical and modern commentaries with a focus on Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi); and develop and apply needed skills and techniques to illustrate an understanding of the Biblical text.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the Book of Deuteronomy alongside an application of classical and modern commentaries, with a focus on the commentary by Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki (Rashi). Students focus on topics that include, but are not limited to the following themes: the covenant between the Torah and the people of Israel; the death of Moses; the appointing of Joshua; and the preparation to enter the land of Israel. Prerequisite: Students need a basic understanding of the Hebrew Language.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biblical Studies, History, or as a general elective (7/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Self study, self-paced.

Dates:

July 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: extract the moral and legal implications of the readings; list the series of events leading up to the leadership of Joshua; detail the political and historical landscape of the pre-Davidic Israel; and analyze the conflict between the Davidic house and that of King Saul.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the Books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings. Students apply lessons taught by various sources from classical and modern commentaries. Focus is on topics that include but are not limited to the following themes; the settling of the land of Israel; the wars of the ancient Israelites; the formation of the Kingdom of Israel; and the rise and fall of the Dividic Empire. Prerequisite: Students need a basic understanding of the Hebrew Language.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biblical Studies, History, or as a general elective (7/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Self study, self-paced.

Dates:

July 2018 - Present.  

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the series of events that led up to the destruction of Israel; list specific warnings given to the Israelites by the Prophets of Israel; detail locations and time periods of different phases of forced exile; and analyze the series of events foretold that will befall the Israelites during their 'ingathering' process.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the Books of Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel. Students apply lessons taught by various sources from classical and modern commentaries. Focus is on topics that include but are not limited to the following themes: the splitting of the Kingdom of Israel; the Assyrian exile; the Babylonian Exile; the Divine Chariot; and the Prophecies yet to be fulfilled. Prerequisite: Students need a basic understanding of the Hebrew Language.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biblical Studies, History, or as a general elective (7/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Self study, self-paced.

Dates:

July 2018 - Present.  

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: list the names and personalities of the '12' Prophets; detail the political and moral state of the Israelites throughout this period of time; apply morals and life lessons taught by the '12' Prophets; and analyze the religious landscape of the Israelites prior to and post the Babylonian exile.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the Books of the '12 Prophets' with a focus on the Books of Ezra and Nehemia. Students apply lessons taught by various sources from classical and modern commentaries. Focus is on topics that include but are not limited to the following themes: the return of the Judeans to Israel from Babylon; the reestablishment of the courts of Israel; the genealogy records preserved in the exile; and the formation of how Judaism became a religion formed during the Judean exile. Prerequisite: Students need a basic understanding of the Hebrew Language.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biblical Studies, History, or as a general elective (7/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Self study, self-paced.

Dates:

July 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: list the various themes and moods portrayed in the writings of King David; detail the political and moral state of the Israelites during the time of King David’s writings; apply moral and life lessons taught by the Book of Psalms; and detail internal struggles faced by King David throughout his reign.

Instruction:

This is an in-depth study of the Books of the Psalms, with a focus on the different expressions of personality and wisdom throughout the text. Students apply lessons taught by various sources from classical and modern commentaries. Focus is on topics that include but are not limited to the following themes: the struggles and achievements throughout the life of King David; hints of prophecies within the text; and the major moral foundations laid out by the text. Prerequisite: Students need a basic understanding of the Hebrew Language.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biblical Studies, History, or as a general elective (7/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Self-study, self-paced.

Dates:

July 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze and discuss the relationship between the world of plant medicine and that of the Biblical narrative; identify and discuss common themes among plant healing and the relevant Biblical text; examine and analyze multiple perspectives of modern day and ancient spirituality among secular and religious individuals; and compare and contrast current perspectives of the human psyche from internationally recognized experts in psychology and of Biblical literature.

Instruction:

This course discusses the major themes of the Torah from the Kabbalistic perspective and presents analyses and commentaries that add deeper meaning to the texts, including: relevant cultural and historical trends, major themes that guide the past, present, and future of the people of Israel, and prophecies that deal with future times. The course materials focus on the basic tenets of Jewish thought, adding deeper meaning to the stories by gaining insight to the world of plant medicine and spiritual states. Other topics include: the purpose of creation, the original sin, exile of the mind, the pursuit of humanity to return to higher level consciousness, and how these themes play out in religious and spiritual communities today.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biblical Studies, Jewish Studies, Psychology, or Philosophy (7/18).

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