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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Joint Apprentice Committee of the Electrical Industry - Local Union 3 | Evaluated Learning Experience

Retired courses-Electrical Installation and Practice - September 1966* - August 2009

Location: 
Coalition School for Social Change, 220 West 58th Street, New York, NY, and other locations in the New York City area.
Length: 

Version 2, Part 1: 4 years; includes 576 hours of classroom instruction and a minimum of 7,000 hours of on-the-job training. Version 2, Part 2: 1 year; includes a minimum of 72 hours of classroom instruction supplemented by a minimum of 1,600 hours of field experience. Version 3 or 4, Part 1: 4 years; includes a minimum of 500 hours of classroom instruction and minimum of 8,000 hours of on-the-job training. Version 3 or 4, Part 2: 1 year; includes a minimum of 125 hours of classroom instruction supplemented by a minimum of 1,600 hours of field experience.

Dates: 

Part 1, Version 2: September 1984 - August 1990. Part 2, Version 2: September 1984 - August 1994. Part 1, Version 3: September 1990 - August 1999. Part 2, Version 3: September 1994 - August 1999. Part 1, Version 4: August 1999 - August 2009. Part 2, Version 4: August 1999 - August 2009.

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 2, Part 1: Read and interpret blueprints; apply appropriate electrical, physical, and mathematical concepts to accomplish the typical duties of a journeyman electrician, such as running conduit, pulling wire, installing power panels and switchgear, making cable terminations (high and low voltage), installing fixtures, wiring motors and motor controls, installing transformers and making connections, circuit testing and troubleshooting, installing fiber optic links, installing process controls, and testing systems for proper operation. Version 2, Part 2: Apply and adapt technical knowledge to site-specific situations; apply New York City code to practical situations; communicate with appropriate agencies and personnel to organize a job effectively; discuss new technical topics. Version 3 and 4, Part 1: Read and interpret blueprints; read and interpret the National Electrical Code utilizing techniques of codeology; apply appropriate electrical, physical, and mathematical concepts to accomplish the typical duties of a journeyman electrician, such as running conduit, pulling wire, installing power panels and switchgear, making cable terminations (high and low voltage), installing fixtures and devices, wiring motors and motor controls, installing transformers and making connections, circuit testing and trouble shooting, installing fiber optic links, and testing systems for proper operation; installing and troubleshooting air conditioning and refrigeration equipment and electronic control systems; installing ground systems. Version 3. Part 2: Install fire alarms and alarm initiating and indicating devices; install motor branch circuits, protection, and motor disconnect sizing; determine residential, multi-family, and commercial loads; install transformer over-current protection; explain wire tables, raceway, and cable tray fills and their uses; perform high voltage testing and insulation testing; define cost awareness; describe planning and managing for productivity; describe cable faults and the techniques for locating cable faults; explain earth testing; install, analyze, and test telephone systems and security alarm systems; describe basic I/O hardware; describe numbering systems; interpret ladder diagrams; explain the function of a shift register. Version 4, Part 2: Install fire alarms and alarm initiating and indicating devices; install motor branch circuits, protection, and motor disconnect sizing; determine residential, multi-family, and commercial loads; install transformer over-current protection; explain wire tables, raceway, and cable tray fills and their uses; perform high voltage testing and insulation testing; define cost awareness; describe planning and managing for productivity; describe cable faults and the techniques for locating cable faults; explain earth testing; install, analyze, and test telephone systems and security alarm systems; describe basic I/O hardware; describe numbering systems; interpret ladder diagrams.

Instruction: 

Version 2, Part 1: Classroom-Applied mathematics; basic DC and AC (including three-phase) circuits; blueprint reading; principles of transformers, motors, and generators; motor controls; industrial electronics and power supplies; fiber optics; safety considerations; standard trade practices; New York City electrical code. On-the-Job-Training- Tools and equipment; communication and signal systems; electrical equipment, maintenance and repair; house wiring; fixture installation; motor work; oil burners, residential and industrial; light and power systems; commercial and industrial wiring; electronic controls. Version 2, Part 2: Application and adaptation of technical knowledge to site-specific situations; New York City electrical code as applied to practical situations; job organization and communication with affected agencies and personnel (ordering materials, job set-up, specifications, safety, etc.); new technical topics such as new technologies and equipment/materials; code changes; discussion of new safety topics. Version 3 and 4, Part 1: Classroom-Applied mathematics; basic AC and DC (including 3-phase) circuitry; blueprint reading; conduit and other raceway fabrication; principles of transformers, motors, and generators; motor controls; single pole, three and four way switches; residential electrical service sizing and installation; air conditioning and refrigeration principles; grounding systems; industrial electronics and power supplies; fiber optics; safety considerations; standard trade practices; national electrical code. Version 3 and 4, Part 2: Classroom-Cost awareness; planning and managing work to improve productivity; fire alarm systems and installation; wiring tables; raceways and cable trays; motor branch circuits and protection; residential, multi-family, and commercial loads; transformer over-current protection; high voltage testing; acceptance and maintenance testing; insulation testing; cable faults; earth testing; telephones and telephone systems; uninterruptible power sources; security systems. On-the-Job Training, Part 1 and 2: Tools, equipment, and materials; communication, data and signal systems; conduit bending; raceway fabrication; proper wiring methods; installation and termination of high and low voltage wiring; control wiring terminations; electrical equipment, maintenance and repair; house wiring; fixture and device installation; motor work; temperature and other sensing devices; blueprint reading and layout; panels and switchgear; fiber optic cable installation and termination; air conditioning and refrigeration; light and power distribution systems; electronic controls.

Credit recommendation: 

Version 2, Part 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 41 semester hours in Electrical Construction and Maintenance which can be distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in Applied Math, 6 semester hours in Basic Electrical Theory, 6 semester hours in Electrical Machinery and Controls, 6 semester hours in Industrial Electronics, 4 semester hours in Electrical Print Reading and Estimating, and 16 hours in Shop; or 15 semester hours in Electrical Technology, which can be distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in Electrical Safety and Practices, 3 semester hours in Applied Math, 3 semester hours in Basic Electricity (no laboratory included), 3 semester hours in Electrical Machinery and Controls, and 3 semester hours in Industrial Electronics (no laboratory included) (10/89). Version 2, Part 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Project Management and Supervision, and 2 semester hours in Review and Application of Selected Technical Topics (10/89). Version 3 and 4, Part 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 41 semester hours in Electrical Construction and Maintenance, distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in Applied Math, 6 semester hours in Basic Electrical Theory, 6 semester hours in Electrical Machinery and Controls, 6 semester hours in Industrial Electronics, 4 semester hours in Electrical Print Reading and Estimating, and 16 hours in Shop; or 15 semester hours in Electrical Technology, distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in General Physics, 3 semester hours in Applied Math, 2 semester hours in Basic Electrical Theory (no laboratory credit recommended), 3 semester hours in Electrical Machinery and Controls, 1 semester hour in Industrial Electronics (no laboratory credit recommended), and 3 semester hours in Electronics (no laboratory credit recommended) (6/94 revalidation) (5/99 revalidation) (6/04 revalidation). Version 3, Part 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 8 semester hours in Electrical Construction and Maintenance, distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in Telecommunication Fundamentals, 2 semester hours in Fire Safety Systems, and 3 semester hours in Commercial Systems (6/94 revalidation). NOTE: A total of 49 semester hours of credit in Electrical Construction and Maintenance or 15 semester hours in Electrical Technology is recommended for the successful completion of all five years of the apprenticeship program, effective September 1994. through August 1999. Version 4, Part 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 5 semester hours in Electrical Construction and Maintenance (5/99 revalidation) (6/04 revalidation). NOTE: A total of 46 semester hours of credit in Electrical Construction and Maintenance or 15 semester hours in Electrical Technology is recommended for the successful completion of all five years of the apprenticeship program, effective September 1999. *NOTE: An earlier version of this course, dating from September 1966 to August 1984 for Part 1, and September 1970 to August 1984 for Part 2, has been recommended for credit. Please contact NCCRS for a pdf of the Local 3 section from the 1994 edition of the course directory. 

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