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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Joint Apprentice Committee of the Electrical Industry - Local Union 3 | Evaluated Learning Experience

Electrical Installation and Practice - September 2009 - Present

Location: 
Beacon High School, 522 West 44th Street, New York, NY, and other locations in the New York City area.
Length: 

Version 5 and 6: 5 years; includes 640 hours of classroom instruction and a minimum of 8,000 hours of field experience. Version 7: 5 years; includes 670 hours of classroom instruction and a minimum of 8,000 hours of field experience. 

Dates: 

Version 5: September 2009 - May 2014. Version 6: June 2014 - June 2019. Version 7: July 2019 - Present. 

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 5: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: read and interpret blueprints; read and interpret the National Electrical Code utilizing techniques of codeology; apply appropriate electrical, physical, and mathematical concepts to accomplish the typical duties of a journeyman electrician, such as running conduit, pulling wire, installing power panels and switchgear, making cable terminations (high and low voltage), installing fixtures and devices, wiring motors and motor controls, installing transformers and making connections, circuit testing and trouble shooting, installing fiber optic links, and testing systems for proper operation; installing and troubleshooting air conditioning and refrigeration equipment and electronic control systems; installing ground systems; install fire alarms and alarm initiating and indicating devices; install motor branch circuits, protection, and motor disconnect sizing; determine residential, multi-family, and commercial loads; install transformer over-current protection; explain wire tables, raceway, and cable tray fills and their uses; perform high voltage testing and insulation testing; define cost awareness; describe planning and managing for productivity; describe cable faults and the techniques for locating cable faults; explain earth testing; install, analyze, and test telephone systems and security alarm systems; describe basic I/O hardware; describe numbering systems; interpret ladder diagrams. Version 6 and 7: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand and apply mathematical concepts regarding fractions, prefixes, powers of 10, algebra and trignometry pertaining to electrical theory and the installation of conduit systems, pulling wire and rigging equipment; read and interpret blueprints; read and interpret the National Electrical Code utilizing techniques of codeology; demonstrate the safety regulations set forth by OSHA; understand the theory of DC and AC power as it applies to electrical installations and troubleshooting; understand transformer principles including installation, termination and grounding of transformers; understand the process of grounding and bonding of electrical systems; understand the theory of motor operations including installation, termination and troubleshooting of motors; understand and apply the concept of motor controls, PLCs, VFDs and motor control centers; understand the concepts and theory behind security systems and fire alarm systems; understand the theory and requirements for Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) systems; apply appropriate electrical, physical and mathematical concepts to accomplish the typical duties of a journeyman electrician, such as running conduit; pulling wire; installing power panels and switchgear; making cable terminations; installing fixtures and devices; wiring motors and motor controls; installing transformers and making connections; circuit testing and troubleshooting; installing fiber optic links and testing systems for proper operation; installing and troubleshooting air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment and electronic control systems; installing grounding systems; installing bonding systems; installing fire alarm and alarm initiating devices; install motor branch circuits, motor protection, and have the ability to size motor disconnects; determine residential multi-family and commercial loads; install transformer overcurrent protection; explain wire tables, raceway and cable tray fills and their uses; perform high voltage and insulation testing; define cost awareness; describe planning and managing for productivity; describe cable faults and the technique for finding them; explain earth testing; install, analyze and test telephone systems and security alarm systems; describe basic I/O hardware; describe numbering systems; and interpret ladder diagrams. 

Instruction: 

Version 5, 6 and 7: Major topics include: Classroom - applied mathematics; basic AC and DC (including 3-phase) circuitry; blueprint reading; conduit and other raceway fabrication; principles of transformers, motors, and generators; motor controls; single pole, three and four way switches; residential electrical service sizing and installation; air conditioning and refrigeration principles; grounding systems; industrial electronics and power supplies; fiber optics; safety considerations; standard trade practices; national electrical code; cost awareness; planning and managing work to improve productivity; fire alarm systems and installation; wiring tables; raceways and cable trays; motor branch circuits and protection; residential, multi-family, and commercial loads; transformer over-current protection; high voltage testing; acceptance and maintenance testing; insulation testing; cable faults; earth testing; telephones and telephone systems; uninterruptible power sources; security systems; and distributed generation and photovoltaics. Major topics include: Supervised Internship/Field Experience - tools, equipment, and materials; communication, data and signal systems; conduit bending; raceway fabrication; proper wiring methods; installation and termination of high and low voltage wiring; control wiring terminations; electrical equipment, maintenance and repair; house wiring; fixture and device installation; motor work; temperature and other sensing devices; blueprint reading and layout; panels and switchgear; fiber optic cable installation and termination; air conditioning and refrigeration; light and power distribution systems; electronic controls.

Credit recommendation: 

Version 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 46 semester hours in Electrical Construction and Maintenance, distributed as follows: 5 semester hours as a supervised internship or field experience, 3 semester hours in Applied Math, 6 semester hours in Basic Electrical Theory, 6 semester hours in Electrical Machinery and Controls, 6 semester hours in Industrial Electronics, 4 semester hours in Electrical Print Reading and Estimating, and 16 hours in Shop; or 15 semester hours in Electrical Technology, distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in General Physics, 3 semester hours in Applied Math, 2 semester hours in Basic Electrical Theory (no laboratory credit recommended), 3 semester hours in Electrical Machinery and Controls, 1 semester hour in Industrial Electronics (no laboratory credit recommended), and 3 semester hours in Electronics (no laboratory credit recommended) (6/09 revalidation). Version 6: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 46 semester hours in Electrical Construction and Maintenance, distributed as follows: 5 semester hours as a supervised internship or field experience, 3 semester hours in Applied Math, 6 semester hours in Basic Electrical Theory, 6 semester hours in Electrical Machinery and Controls, 6 semester hours in Industrial Electronics, 4 semester hours in Electrical Print Reading and Estimating, and 16 hours in Shop; or 12 semester hours in Electrical Technology, distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in General Physics, 3 semester hours in Applied Math, 2 semester hours in Basic Electrical Theory (no laboratory credit recommended), 3 semester hours in Electrical Machinery and Controls, 1 semester hour in Industrial Electronics (no laboratory credit recommended) (6/14 revalidation). Version 7: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 54 semester hours in Electrical Construction and Maintenances, distributed as follows: 6 semester hours as a supervised internship, fieled experience or electrical co-op; 6 semester hours in Technical Math; 3 semester hours in Introduction to Electrical Systems; 3 semester hours in DC Systems; 3 semester hours in AC Systems; 3 semester hours in Introduction to Industrial Electronics; 3 semester hours in Electrical Blueprint Reading; 3 semester hours in Electrical Estimating; 3 semester hours in Electrical Motors; 3 semester hours in Electrical Motor Controllers; 3 semester hours in Introduction to Industrial Safety; 3 semester hours in Electrical/Electronic Troubleshooting and Maintenance; 3 semester hours in Codes and Practices; 3 semester hours in Introduction to Transformers; 3 semester hours in Electrical Safety; and 3 semester hours in Generator and Distribution Systems (6/19 revalidation).

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