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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Teacher Training Program

NOTE: The Teacher Training Program represents a two-year integrated learning experience; therefore, credit is recommended only after an individual has successfully completed the entire program.

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Various child care facilities associated with the Caritas Training Center.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 45 hours (15 weeks).

Dates:
Version 1: April 1996 - August 2008. Version 2: September 2008 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define and recognize the landmarks of physical, social, cognitive, emotional, and linguistic development in the young child and use techniques of observation in tracking a child's development; identify major theorists and discuss their key ideas; compare the ideas of different theorists with those of Maria Montessori; discuss the ideas of theorists as they apply to classroom situations; select and provide the child with developmentally appropriate activities for each age and each stage of growth; identify developmental problems and provide appropriate activities for children with special needs; discuss the child's place in the family and the need to involve families in the child's healthy development; develop plans to create and furnish an an age appropriate space; and discuss articles on brain research in planning an interactive environment for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Version 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be to: define and recognize the landmarks of physical, social, cognitive, emotional, and linguistic development in young children and use techniques of observation in tracking children's development; identify major theorists and discuss their key ideas; compare the ideas of different theorists with those of Maria Montessori; discuss the ideas of theorists as they apply to classroom situations; discuss articles on brain research; select and provide children with developmentally appropriate activities for each age and each stage of growth; identify developmental problems and provide appropriate activities for children with special needs; and discuss children's place in the family and suggest ways to involve families in their healthy development.

Instruction:

Version 1: This course introduces students in early childhood programs to the various theorists whose ideas focus on the development of young children. The course covers physical/cognitive development from birth through preschool and on to middle childhood, social/emotional development, and moral development. Major theorists who are prominent in each area are compared with the Montessori method and philosophy. The final portion of the course concentrates on the creation of an interactive age appropriate environment. Reading assignments, child development assignments and video tapes, child development and infant/toddler albums of age appropriate work, and examination are requirements of the course. Version 2: This course introduces students in early childhood programs to the various theorists whose ideas focus on the development of young children. The course covers physical/cognitive development from conception through preschool and on to middle childhood, social/emotional development and moral development. Major theorists, who are prominent in each area, are compared with the Montessori method and philosophy. Reading assignments, child development assignments and video tapes, child development and a child development album and examination are requirements of the course.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Montessori Education (6/00) (8/06 revalidation) (8/10 revalidation) (11/15 revalidation).

Location:
Various child care facilities associated with the Caritas Training Center.
Length:
48 hours.
Dates:
April 1996 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: introduce developmentally appropriate activities in an actual classroom setting based on concepts, philosophy and approach presented in the course; observe and record outcomes in child development, and write and implement appropriate lesson plans for each curriculum area; create a healthy, safe, welcoming learning environment for infants, toddlers, or preschoolers; present and adapt materials for individual children with or without disabilities; recognize signs of suspected child abuse and follow correct guidelines for reporting; establish relationships with parents who are supportive of the child in a social learning environment; and complete all required documentation with accuracy.

Instruction:

This course prepares students to manage the day-to-day requirements of an Early Childhood Head Start or Day Care classroom, including respect, observation, and preparation. Respect for children, for parents, for fellow staff members, and supervisors is a goal that is built into every session. Students are introduced to multiple forms of observation that are the basis for the preparation of the learning and social environment. The areas of preparation cover the environment, discipline/positive guidance, planning and recording, communication, and staff development. Health, safety, nutrition, and working with exceptional needs children are a focus of the course. Components of the course are also geared to providing freedom, structure and order, reality and nature, beauty and atmosphere, leading to the development of a community of children. Topics include: starting the year; arrangement of the classroom; discipline/positive guidance techniques; health and safety procedures; program planning; record keeping; team building; and maintenance of materials. Students make three observational visits to several local Montessori programs and prepare child studies and classroom management reports.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Montessori Education (6/00) (8/06 revalidation) (11/11 revalidation) (11/16 revalidation).

Location:
Various child care facilities associated with the Caritas Training Center.
Length:
 45 hours.
Dates:
September 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: collect and present relevant ideas illustrating concepts in developing a theme in all cultural areas; design an integrated sequence of materials that  move from simple to complex in expanding the context of a concept into other curriculum areas; create materials for independent work in all cultural areas that  are age appropriate for preschool children; use appropriate background material and resources to explain and analyze the purpose and value of each cultural area; and discuss and demonstrate the experience of creating art that displays individual expression while utilizing a particular technique with a variety of media.

Instruction:

This course prepares students to offer children a basic foundation in five cultural subjects: music, science, geography, history, and art. In the Montessori classroom, the cultural subjects are not divided because they overlap in so many different ways. In reviewing basic ideas and in experiencing the concepts in a form that is age-appropriate for preschool children in day care and Head Start settings, students develop a foundation of skills upon which they can expand to broaden the child's understanding of the world that surrounds them. The music component is a fundamental introduction to the elements of music, to basic ideas and activities of listening, movement, call and response, echo rhythms, and ways of developing young children's voices. In the science component, children begin with basic concepts of physical and geological science with magnification, prisms, magnets, volcanoes, rocks, etc. Botany and zoology, plants and animals, follow. Students construct an exploration journal that highlights observation skills. The geography component begins with the understanding of spatial relationships and expands to include globes, maps, people, cultures, and the world, both local and global. In the history component for the pre-school child, the emphasis in history is on the development of an understanding of time. Only then can children begin to develop a concept of the history of the earth and its people. The art component fills an important role in children's ability to visualize and conceptualize their ideas about the world. The emphasis is in encouraging classroom teachers to teach techniques and not outcomes. Students create five albums, one in each area of study, that illustrate the correct use of materials in developmentally appropriate activities.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Montessori Education (8/06) (11/11 revalidation) (11/16 revalidation).

Location:
Various child care facilities associated with the Caritas Training Center.
Length:

 45 hours (8 weeks).

Dates:
November 2008 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate awareness of the importance of early care; train staff to provide that care, aid staff in understanding the changing needs of infants, mobile infants, and toddlers and to provide resources to maintain a high quality of care for these stages of growth; define and recognize the developmental landmarks of physical, social, cognitive, and linguistic development of children from birth to three; identify the goals and objectives for working with infants and toddlers and how these practices can influence development; prepare and furnish an appropriate infant/toddler learning environment; explore and define theories of child development from birth to three years of age and identify what to expect from children as they travel through the various stages of development; appreciate the importance of bonding, attachment, trust, routines, consistency, and flexibility when caring for infants and toddlers; observe and record observations; utilize a variety of observation tools and apply them to enhance the development of infants and toddlers through the environment and lesson planning; identify "red flags" (children at risk of not meeting age-appropriate milestones) and identify necessary steps to provide early intervention services for those children; identify, handle, and monitor safety concerns in an infant/toddler indoor and outdoor environment; and examine various health and nutrition guidelines and requirements of infants and toddlers.

Instruction:

This course serves as a manual of operation for caregivers and covers three areas: overview of the developmental needs of the infant and toddler as a guide for the caregiver; manual for design and preparation of the infant and toddler environments; and a resource for the requirements and recommendations for the health, safety, and nutrition of infants and toddlers.  The course provides staff with interactive activities through group discussions and writings to build their own knowledge. Various topics include: effects of brain research in the improved understanding of physical development, cognition, and language; best practices in how to engage infants and toddlers in learning games of interactive parent/caregiver and child activities; safety issues of environmental design; principles of adaptation in providing practical life and sensorial materials for these age groups; dental health; toilet training; immunizations, illnesses of young children; nutrition; feeding skills; food preparation; allergies; obesity; toddler schedule (the journey to independence); classroom management; lesson plans; observation and recording skills; developmental guidelines and signs of disorders; developmental screenings; progress reports; parent communication; National Health and Safety Standards; Early Head Start Performance Standards and Day Care checklists.  Exercises include: group work, quizzes, homework, design of infant and toddler environments, readings and discussions of articles, videos, and presentations of the Montessori Environment.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Montessori Early Childhood Education (8/10) (11/15 revalidation).

Location:
Various child care facilities associated with the Caritas Training Center.
Length:
48 hours.
Dates:
September 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss and participate in the various elements in the intake and orientation process with parents, including home visits; evaluate the process and be able to offer ideas and suggestions for improvement; discuss the requirements of the Child Abuse laws, and the referral process for disabilities; conduct the developmental assessment on new children; discuss and use the integrated process of observation, recording and reporting children's progress and relating positively with  parents in the exchange of necessary information regarding their children; convey correct information about the Montessori curriculum and correctly answer questions that parents might ask; use both a traditional process for dealing with challenging behavior and a process that goes beyond behavior management to the development of life skills; use community profiles and community resources in creating workshops and programs that serve the needs of families and children; use the appropriate processes to participate in a family's transition from the Head Start/day care program into the public school environment; and plan and create workshops which are both informative and inviting.

Instruction:

In the intern year, students attend eight workshops (six hours each) that focus on Family and Community. Also included is twelve hours of work with children with challenging behaviors. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the primary components of the Family and Community Partnership that federally funded early childhood programs are expected and mandated to maintain.  Each workshop explores and defines one or several elements of this partnership from parent orientation through transition of children into public school. Students identify the various instruments used, complete the documentation, critique the application in their own program, evaluate and reflect upon the strengths and weaknesses, and propose ways in which their own program could be improved.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Montessori Education (8/06) (11/11 revalidation) (11/16 revalidation).

Location:
Various child care facilities associated with the Caritas Training Center.
Length:
48 hours.
Dates:
September 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Math: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: introduce and present math manipulatives in a manner that best supports the development of age-appropriate concepts for preschool children; classify and sequence math skills presented in each area in order to build upon knowledge and strengths that children have already gained; present and adapt materials for children with disabilities; recognize and incorporate relevant ideas and applications for materials when they are created through discovery by children; observe and record children's outcomes in mastery of materials; individualize planning to meet the diverse levels of understanding within the class; create a supportive environment for the discovery and appreciation of mathematical ideas. Language: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: introduce and present language development materials in five areas of language: early writing development, language patterning skills, phonetic analysis, grammar development and age-appropriate literature/drama /poetry; create language materials for individual work in all five areas; develop resources of quality children's literature in both fiction and non-fiction areas; adapt materials to provide a print-rich age-appropriate environment for children with all levels of English language proficiency; involve children in grammar games that illustrate the structure of language; recognize the importance of self-expression in spoken and written language; and observe and record children's work mastery that is used in curriculum planning.

Instruction:

This course prepares students to teach preschool Math and Language using the Montessori method and materials.  Students are introduced to math manipulatives and though practice and familiarity with the materials, students become increasingly aware of the value of math manipulatives in developing the age appropriate math foundation in young children.  Emphasis is placed upon the sequence and order of materials and the importance of how different areas of math skills are integrated to build concepts. Language games introduce many of the concepts of grammar in a simple and age appropriate manner. Students experience work in five different areas of language: writing, language patterning, phonetic analysis, and literature/drama/poetry and grammar and demonstrate proficiency by presenting materials in math and language to the group and in creating classroom materials. Along with a written essay in each subject area, students create a drawing for each work that illustrates the manner in which it is presented. Emphasis is placed on student participation. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Montessori Education (8/06) (11/11 revalidation) (11/16 revalidation).

Location:
Various child care facilities associated with the Caritas Training Center.
Length:
45 hours.
Dates:
April 1996 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be to: arrange  and maintain classroom areas of practical life and sensorial materials; create and use age appropriate materials and adjust all materials for these areas to meet different developmental stages; help children function in their own environment,  care for the environment and  increase their attention span, develop self-discipline, and refine gross and fine motor skills through practical life activities; support children's development in sensorial skills of matching, sorting, and exploration of the five senses through the use of concrete manipulative materials; and research and create materials that are age appropriate for preschool children.

Instruction:

This course introduces students to the materials for Practical Life and Sensorial areas. Students learn to utilize materials familiar to the child's own environment to help the child in the development of an increased attention span, self-discipline, gross and fine motor skills, and a sense of independence; share in the skills of grace and courtesy and care of the environment that aid the child in developing a sense of cooperation and community; explore the sensory materials which isolate each sense and aid the child in sensory discrimination through matching, grading, sorting and other manipulative exercises of order and construction; arrange, maintain, and present these materials within the classroom and adjust presentations to fit the stages of development of children. In addition, students create materials that are age appropriate and serve the developing skills of their children;  illustrate their presentations in an organized album for each area and write essays that summarize concepts and philosophy of the Montessori Method which are applicable to the practical life and sensorial areas. There are nine hours of supervised practice with student partners along with six hours of oral presentation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Montessori Education (6/00) (8/06 revalidation) (11/11 revalidation) (11/16 revalidation).

Location:
Various child care facilities associated with the Caritas Training Center
Length:

Version 1: Minimum 216 hours of supervised practicum/field experience. Version 2: Minimum 168 hours of supervised practicum/field experience. Version 3: 40 days (280 hours).

Dates:

Version 1: April 1996 - August 2005. Version 2: September 2005 - August 2008. NOTE: Version 2 was divided to create a similar supervised practicum/field experience in a course entitled Family and Community (360). Please refer to that exhibit for more information. Version 3: September 2008 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: carry out developmentally appropriate activities in an actual classroom setting based on the concepts, philosophy, and approach presented in the lecture; write and implement appropriate lesson plans for each curriculum area; develop practical classroom skills that integrate the philosophy, materials, and methods of the Montessori approach; track the developmental growth of a particular child; discuss and use observation tools for tracking various aspects of a child's development; recognize the importance of cooperation and planning in classroom management through the use of forms and checklists; practice time management in meeting responsibilities of the classroom and other responsibilities of the Early Childhood center; build confidence in oneself and experience success in the classroom or other roles of the Early Childhood program; and use evaluations and correction action plans to improve performance.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Under the direct observation and supervision of a head teacher, students observe children and write monthly diaries relating their observations to class discussion, engage children in developmentally appropriate activities, read articles and textual materials, conduct a child study and provide a monthly report, keep a journal, and view and discuss videos to support the concepts, philosophy, and approach presented in the lecture. Prerequisite: Child Development - Birth Through Middle Childhood (160).

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 9 semester hours as a supervised field experience or internship in Montessori Education (6/00). Version 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours as a supervised field experience or internship in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, or Montessori Education (8/06 revalidation) (11/11 revalidation) (11/16 revalidation). *NOTE: Version 2 of this course was divided to create a similar Supervised Practicum/Field Experience in a course entitled Family and Community (360). Please refer to that exhibit for further information. 

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