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Arnot Ogden Medical Center School of Nursing | Evaluated Learning Experience

Pharmacology 110

Formerly Pharmacology 120
Location: 
Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length: 

Version 1: 36 hours (13 weeks); in addition, 10 hours of independent study on computation of doses. Version 2: 36 hours (13 weeks). Version 3, 4, and 5: 37.5 hours (13 weeks).

Dates: 

Version 1: August 1990 - May 2000.* Version 2: June 2000 - August 2001. Version 3: September 2001 - November 2001. Version 4 and 5: December 2002 - Present.

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: provide for clients requiring drug therapy, apply drug standards and current legislation that promotes a safe therapeutic environment; discuss the principles of pharmacotherapeutics and pharmacodynamics used to assess, plan, implement and evaluate drug therapy plans; identify the psychological and emotional aspects of drug therapy in relation to clients' return to optimal health; accurately compute medication dosages in order to maintain a safe therapeutic environment; identify the teaching/learning process and assessment factors used in preparing clients for discharge on maintenance drug therapy; discuss nursing responsibilities that are inherent in safe administration of medications; and recognize alternate lifestyle patterns inherent in self-medication, the use of over-the-counter drugs, street drugs, drug abuse and misuse, without becoming judgmental. Version 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be to: apply drug standards and current legislation that promotes a safe therapeutic environment; discuss the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics used to assess, plan, implement and evaluate drug therapy plans; identify the psychological and emotional aspects of drug therapy in relation to clients' return to optimal health; accurately compute medication dosages in order to maintain a safe therapeutic environment; discuss the teaching/learning process and assessment factors used in preparing clients for discharge on maintenance drug therapy; and recognize alternate lifestyle patterns inherent in self-medication, the use of over-the-counter drugs, street drugs, drug abuse and misuse, without becoming judgmental. Version 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply drug standards and current legislation that promotes a safe therapeutic environment; discuss the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics used to assess, plan, implement and evaluate drug therapy plans; identify the psychological and emotional aspects of drug therapy in relation to clients' return to optimal health; accurately compute medication dosages in order to maintain a safe therapeutic environment; discuss the teaching/learning process and assessment factors used in preparing clients for discharge on maintenance drug therapy; and recognize alternate lifestyle patterns inherent in self-medication, and the use of over-the-counter drugs. Version 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the moral, legal, and ethical issues, the professional nursing standards, current drug legislation, and their significant implications in promoting a safe, therapeutic environment for clients/patients/consumers requiring drug therapy; apply knowledge from the biological, behavioral, social science, and nursing sciences to provide safe and competent medication administration to consumers of various ages and their families; discuss collaborative critical thinking and the nursing process in order to achieve primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions for health care consumers undergoing maintenance drug therapy; accurately compute medication dosages in order to maintain a safe therapeutic environment for clients/patients/consumers of various ages that require drug therapy to attain optimal health; utilize the principles of teaching/learning/anticipatory guidance to enhance consumer knowledge of drug therapy and improve their compliance during self-care; and identify his/her own personal and professional learning goals that focus on providing safe and therapeutic drug administration to individuals across the life span at any point along the wellness-illness continuum. Version 5: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify the moral, legal, and ethical issues, the professional nursing standards, current drug legislation and their significant implications in promoting a safe, therapeutic environment for patients/patients/s requiring drug therapy; apply knowledge from the biological, behavioral, social sciences and nursing sciences to provide safe and competent medication administration to patients of various ages; discuss collaborative critical thinking and the nursing process in order to achieve primary, secondary and tertiary interventions for the healthcare of patients undergoing maintenance drug therapy; accurately compute medication dosages in order to maintain a safe therapeutic environment for patients of various ages that require drug therapy to attain optimal health; utilize the principles of teaching/learning/anticipatory guidance to enhance knowledge of drug therapy and improve their compliance during self-care; and identify their own personal and professional learning goals that focus on providing safe and therapeutic drug administration to individuals across the life span at any point along the wellness-illness continuum. 

Instruction: 

Version 1: Principles of pharmacotherapeutics and pharmacodynamics; psychologic and physiologic concepts related to drug therapy, drug abuse, and drug misuse; alterations in drug therapy responses in the geriatric client; general drug classifications utilized in adult clients encountering alterations in homeostasis related to pain, need for mental and physical rest, inflammatory and infectious responses, and disturbances in bowel elimination; computations of medication dosages. Version 2 and 3: Principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; psychologic and physiologic concepts related to drug therapy, drug abuse, and drug misuse; alterations in drug therapy responses in the geriatric client; general drug classifications utilized in adult clients encountering alterations in homeostasis related to pain, need for mental and physical rest, inflammatory and infectious responses, and disturbances in bowel elimination; practice in the computations of medication dosages. Critical thinking and client teaching is emphasized by utilizing the nursing process and selected case studies. Version 4 and 5: Same as Version 2 or 3; in addition, neurological and neuromuscular agents; respiratory agents; and cardiovascular agents.

Credit recommendation: 

Version 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Pharmacology (7/91 revalidation) (7/97 revalidation) (6/02 revalidation) (6/07 revalidation) (6/12 revalidation) (6/17 revalidation). *NOTE: Earlier versions of this course are listed under the course grouping beginning with Nursing (101 and 102). Please refer to the 1990 Directory and to the Retired Courses subsection for this organization.

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