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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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Arnot Ogden Medical Center School of Nursing | Evaluated Learning Experience

1. Nursing 201 Medical Surgical Nursing Across the Lifespan; 2. Nursing 301; 3. Nursing 302

Location: 
Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length: 

Course 1:  234 hours; includes 78 hours of theory and 156 hours of supervised clinical experience. Course 2: Version 1: 312 hours (13 weeks); includes 78 hours of theory and 234 hours of supervised clinical experience. Course 2: Version 2: 316 Hours (13 weeks); includes 79 hours of theory and 237 hours of supervised clinical experience. Course 3: Version 1: 312 hours (13 weeks); includes 78 hours of theory and 234 hours of supervised clinical experience. Course 3: Version 2: 316 hours  (13 weeks); includes 79 hours of theory and 237 hours of supervised clinical experience.

Dates: 

Course 1: July 1991 - Present.* Course 2: Version 1: January 1992 - May 2017. Course 2: Version 2: June 2017 - Present. Course 3: Version 1: April 1992 - May 2015.*  Course 3: Version 2: June 2017 - Present.

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: practice accountability for quality improvement, consumer advocacy and cost effective use of health care resources within the legal/ethical standards of the nursing profession in providing care for diverse medical-surgical patients/consumers across the life span and their families; apply knowledge from the biological, behavioral, social and nursing sciences in providing safe, technically competent and holistic nursing care of patients/consumers of various ages and their families responding to complex medical-surgical health problems; practice as an effective member of the interdisciplinary health team through integrating critical thinking, collaboration, nursing process and shared decision making to evaluate primary, secondary and tertiary interventions to assist patients/consumers/families experiencing complex medical-surgical problems achieve desired outcomes at various points along the wellness-illness continuum; demonstrate a caring relationship, therapeutic communication and positive interpersonal skills to promote effective individual and health team interaction to achieve consumer satisfaction in patients/consumers/families with complex acute and chronic medical-surgical problems; function as a nurse teacher to promote, maintain and restore wellness through sharing of knowledge, skills and anticipatory guidance needed for the medical-surgical patient/consumer/family to achieve self-care and optimal health; and exhibit qualities of self-development that indicates personal and professional growth. Course 2: Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: respect the philosophy, beliefs, interests and needs of each client with biopsychosocial alterations of major life functions; discuss legal and professional ramifications of caring for acutely ill individuals; relate theoretical and scientific nursing principles to the human responses of acutely ill clients whose health patterns are dysfunctional; integrate the nursing process to implement a plan of care with clients who have rapidly changing biopsychosocial health conditions; use therapeutic communication techniques to distinguish between highly unstable functional and/or organic problems in order to provide support to the client; implement the teaching-learning process appropriate to the developmental levels of individuals (pediatric, adult, and elderly) and their families to stabilize and/or improve fluctuating situations; and analyze self perception regarding personal and professional growth. Course 3: Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: relate legal, moral, ethical, and professional principles to critically ill clients and their families; use knowledge of the biopsychosocial and nursing sciences relevant to the specific responses that occur as the clients respond to problems of critical life function; adapt the nursing process to assist critically ill clients in the restoration of their homeokinesis; interact with members of the health team in attaining the highest level possible on the wellness-illness continuum for clients with critical illnesses; appraise the teaching-learning process applicable to the critically ill clients and families at various developmental levels (pediatric, adult, and elderly); and examine own personal and professional development as it applies to critical care situations.

Instruction: 

Course 1: This course addresses the natural, biological, and physiological defense mechanisms that are stressed during an individual's illness. Major topics include: concepts related to cellular injury, altered immune responses, and fluid and electrolyte imbalances, specific client responses throughout the lifespan (pediatric, adult, and elderly) related to disruptions of musculoskeletal, integumentary, gastrointestinal, reproductive and chronic respiratory systems, problems related to infections, infectious diseases and diabetes, continued assessment skills, nutrition and pharmacology and client teachings within primarily an acute care setting. Teaching methods include skills labs, case studies, pre/post tests, lecture, films, and computerized programmed instruction. Concepts from the classroom lecture are applied in the clinical setting. Course 2: Version 1 and 2: This course deals with clients across the lifespan (pediatric, adult, elderly) who are receiving acute care for an exacerbation of a chronic health problem. These problems relate to changes in cellular structure, alterations to the blood forming organs, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, metabolic alterations, and cardiovascular alterations. Integrated throughout the course are nutritional, psychological, pharmacological, social, legal, and ethical concepts. Comprehensive assessments of functional and dysfunctional health patterns are conducted for planning nursing interventions with a focus on teaching strategies which enable the client to gain homeokinesis. Teaching methods include lecture, case-studies, seminars, pre and post-clinical conferences, and group presentations. A research paper is required. Concepts from the classroom lecture are applied in the clinical setting. The student selects clinical learning experiences which correlate theory with clinical experience. Students participate in nursing laboratories for competency in advanced IV therapy and EKG interpretation. Course 3: Version 1 and 2: This course deals with highly complex clients across the lifespan (pediatric, adult, elderly) whose human responses are of an unstable critical nature and who is attempting to adjust to changes related to gas exchange, sensori-neuromuscular dysfunction, interference in cardiovascular circulation or impact and effects of multiple trauma. Technological devices are used for assessment as well as for life sustaining interventions. The student prepares for identification of rapidly changing human needs, analysis of data, decision making, multiple nursing diagnoses, stress in the client, family, and/or nurse, and revision of care. Principles of therapeutic nutrition and pharmacology are integrated throughout the course. Concepts from the classroom lecture are applied in the clinical setting. Clinical experiences range from the neonatal unit to the adult critical care unit. Students participate in nursing laboratories for competency in airway suctioning, trauma assessment, advanced neurological assessment, and hemodynamic monitoring.

Credit recommendation: 

Course 1, Courses 2 and 3: Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 12 semester hours as Medical/Surgical Nursing Across the Lifespan (7/93 revalidation) (7/97 revalidation) (6/02 revalidation) (6/07 revalidation) (6/12 revalidation) (6/17 revalidation). NOTE: Course 1, 2 and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. *NOTE: For information on an earlier version of these courses, please refer to the Retired Courses section for this organization. Further, the earliest versions, dating from March 1981 to January 1987, September 1981 to February 1987, and November 1981 to August 1987 respectively, were listed in a course grouping that included Nursing (303) in the 1990 Directory.

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