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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Western Electrical Contractors Association (WECA) | Evaluated Learning Experience

Residential Apprenticeship Program (Residential Wireman Training Program)

Location: 

Approved training facilities in Sacramento, Riverside and San Diego, California.

Length: 

3 years, includes 480 hours of classroom instruction and 4,800 hours of field experience.

Dates: 

September 2013 - Present. 

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Upon successful completion of the program, students will be able to: recall and apply the fundamental laws of electrical circuit theory to solve problems and analyze series, parallel, and combination circuits; construct, simulate and analyze electrical circuits and systems; apply the National Electric Code (NEC) to basic residential and commercial electrical installation projects; design and install electrical power and lighting branch circuits, using necessary National Electrical Code (NEC) calculations, lighting controls, and lamp/fixture/equipment information; recall and utilize conduit bending techniques and conductor fill calculations; identify and apply safety, operation, and maintenance practices for scissor and boom lifts; discuss and analyze requirements for residential and commercial branch circuits, feeders, and services, using load, parallel conductor, grounding, derating, and motor size calculations; develop proficiency in using NEC tables, articles, measurements, and terminology related to conductor properties; and apply it to simulated field scenarios; apply conduit bending techniques, NEC code, and best practices to size equipment and conductors for the installation of electric motors; discuss, differentiate and explain advanced electrical theory principles, including peak voltage, RMS voltage, inductance, impedance, capacitance, reactive power, voltage drop, true power, apparent power, VARs, waveforms, phase angle, R-L parallel circuits, and R-C Parallel circuits; apply appropriate electrical theory, engineering techniques and calculations to solve advanced electrical circuit problems; construct, simulate, measure, test, and analyze advanced electrical circuits; identify the sections and major topics included in the California Certification Exam, and explain the proper procedures for taking the exam; demonstrate knowledge of electrical fundamentals, principles, formulas, calculations and code interpretations relevant to the California General Electrical Certification Exam; demonstrate proficiency using the practice of subject indexing to quickly and accurately locate the National Electrical Code (NEC) article related to any given electrical installation question; define a foreman’s primary job and safety-related responsibilities and demonstrate best practices in project estimation and preparation of jobsite documentation; demonstrate communication, conflict resolution, and motivational techniques used in leadership positions; and explain the concepts and theory behind security and fire alarm systems.

Instruction: 

Instruction is offered via classroom and includes supplemental readings, quizzes, homework, lab required interaction with instructor, and final exams. Major topics include: Electrical Safety; PPE; First Aid and CPR; Harassment Prevention; Basic Electrical Theory; Electrical Fundamentals; Math; Electrical Engineering Calculations; DC Systems; AC Systems; Circuit Wiring Schemes; Single-phase Systems; Three-phase Systems; Tools and Electrical Test Equipment; Material Handling; Electrical Symbols; Basic Electrical Drawings; Electrical Code Navigation; Residential Energy Code; Electrical Raceways; Electrical Device Layout; Electrical Installation Methods; Power Distribution Systems; Transformers; Generation and Power Supplies; Electrical Distribution Circuits; Single-phase Equipment; Three-phase Equipment; Basic Lighting Control; Electrical Code Interpretation; Specialty Systems; Fire Alarm Systems; Foremanship; Communication; and Personal Development.  

Credit recommendation: 

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 40 semester hours in Electrical Construction and Maintenance, distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in Introduction to Electrical Systems, 3 semester hours in DC systems, 3 semester hours in AC Systems, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Industrial Safety, 6 semester hours in Technical Math, 2 semester hours in Electric Codes, 1 semester hour in Introduction to Project Planning, 3 semester hours in Blueprint Reading, 6 semester hours in Basic Electrical Troubleshooting and Maintenance, 3 semester hours in Motors and Controllers, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Electronics, 3 semester hours in Basic Electronic Troubleshooting and Maintenance, and 1 semester hour in Construction Management (10/18). NOTE: Credit shall only be awarded upon full completion of the apprenticeship program.

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