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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

EdTech Institute, LLC (formerly The Sage Group, LLC) | Evaluated Learning Experience

1. Data Networking (216A or 316)* 2. Telephony Networking (216B OR 317)* 3.Convergence Technologies (216C OR 318)* (VoIP Convergence Technologies)

Location: 
Various approved locations throughout the United States.
Length: 
Version 1: Course 1: 21 hours (7 weeks); Course 2: 18 hours (6 weeks); Course 3: 12 hours (4 weeks). Version 2: Course 1: 30 hours (10 weeks) Course 2: 30 hours (10 weeks) Course 3: 30 hours (10 weeks)
Dates: 

Version 1: Course 1, 2, or 3: December 2005 - March 2006. Version 2: Course 1, 2, 3: February 2013 - December 2018.

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 1: Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define networking and identify network architectures, network topology characteristics, and the major network operating systems; explain the Open Systems Interconnection reference model (OSI/RM) and its relationship to the packet creation process and TCP/IP; identify the network devices associated with LANs and WANs and the common cable types used in networking, including coaxial, fiber optic, and twisted pair; explain the TCP/IP architecture, including the TCP/IP suite protocols and their respective RFCs; describe the routing process; identify IP address classes and reserved IP addresses; determine default and custom subnet masks; describe various diagnostic tools for troubleshooting TCP/IP networks. Version 2: Course 1: define networking, and identify network architectures, network topology characteristics, cable distribution schemes, and network media and cabling procedures; identify major industry standards bodies, and obtain and read standards documents; compare and contrast various data and voice transmission technologies, including E-carrier, T-carrier, Synchronous Optical Network/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SONET/SDH) and Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN); explain the Open Systems Interconnection reference model (OSI/RM) and its relationship to the packet creation process and TCP/IP; identify the network devices associated with LANs and WANs, and the common cable types used in networking, including coaxial, fiber optic and twisted pair; define networking methods, standards and protocols, and their characteristics; explain the concept of protocol tunneling, and identify elements and benefits of using a Virtual Private Network (VPN) in a convergent network; identify wireless networking equipment and functionality, describe wireless settings, and identify security issues inherent to wireless networks; explain the TCP/IP architecture, including the TCP/IP suite protocols, and common ports and services; describe the routing process; identify IP address classes, reserved IP addresses, IP addressing rules, and methods for IP address conservation; determine default and custom subnet masks, and use CIDR notation; identify the need for Quality of Service (QoS) in convergent networks, and identify QoS technologies; identify the elements and benefits of Virtual LANs (VLANs) in convergent networks; and describe various diagnostic tools for troubleshooting TCP/IP networks. Version 1: Course 2: identify the call processing steps (call setup, call connection, call completion); compare analog trunks and station lines; identify electrical characteristics of ground-start and loop-start analog trunks; identify the various types of E&M trunks; describe different Digital Signal Hierarchy (DSH) technologies; describe Pulse Code Modulation in telephony; identify the functions of CLASS 4 (tandem) and CLASS 5 (end-office) switches in regard to PSTN/GSTN; describe various numbering plans (global, NANP, private); identify the differences between FXO and FXS interfaces; identify safety procedures (cabling, power, grounding, ESD, NEBS); identify troubleshooting tools (4-pair tester, inductor/buzzer/toner), lineman's test handset (butt set), volt meter and laptop; identify various cable terminations (USOC/RJ-nn and ITU/V.nn standards). Version 2: Course 2: define codec, and describe the G.711 protocol; Define Pulse Code Modulation (PCM), and distinguish between the u- Law and A-Law commanding algorithms; explain common feature sets for voice calls, including call waiting, call blocking, call forwarding, call monitoring, callback, and additional private network features; Explain Direct Inward Dialing (DID); Define hunt groups; Identify elements of a call center or contact center, including call routing, caller ID, automatic call distributors, pop-ups, instant messaging/chat, e-mail, real-time voice and data recording/storage, hosted solutions, and elements of Computer Telephony Integration (CTI); explain the purpose of network termination equipment (NTE), including timing, conversion of signaling types, troubleshooting interface; Identify symptoms of improper clocking configuration (e.g., problems with synchronization); Resolve problems when connecting time division multiplexing (TDM) networks (e.g., in-band and out- of-band signaling, digital and analog setup messages, safety practices and standards, crosstalk, split, line imbalance, open, short, grounding issues, echo cancellation in two- wire-to-four-wire hybrids); Identify and use appropriate troubleshooting tools (e.g., four-pair tester, tone-and-probe kit, analog and/or digital butt set, volt meter, time domain reflectometer); identify safety procedures for working with convergent network equipment (e.g., power, proper grounding, electrostatic discharge [ESD], radio frequency interference [RFI], electromagnetic interference [EMI]); Identify basic ISDN services and protocols, including time slots, channels, ISDN2e/Basic Rate Interface (BRI), ISDN30/Primary Rate Inter- face (PRI); define the Q.931, Q.932, I.430 and Q.921/High-level Data Link Control (HDLC) standards, including identifying the typical call progress signals (e.g., alerting, call proceeding, etc.); define QSIG, H.450 (including supplementary services), Digital Access Signaling System 1 (DASS1), private networking, and Digital Private Network Signaling System (DPNSS); Define Signaling System 7 (SS7)/Common Channel Signaling 7 (C7) functions, including call setup, management and teardown; signaling links; signaling points (e.g., service switching point [SSP], signal transfer point [STP], service control point [SCP]). Version 1: Course 3: identify the major industry standards and organizations relevant to convergence technologies; identify components and characteristics of a VoIP network; define the Quality of Service (QoS) technologies used in convergence networks; identify the characteristics of circuit-switched and packet-switched networks; identify the functions of signaling protocols used in convergence networks; configure and utilize an Internet voice connection using Windows Net meeting. Version 2: Course 3: compare and contrast circuit-switched and packet-switched technologies; define the Realtime Transport Protocol (RTP) and the Realtime Transport Control Protocol (RTCP); identify the components of Session Initiation Protocol (SIP); identify the functions of signaling protocols for converged networks; compare and contrast the functions of gatekeepers, gateways and proxies in relation to SIP and H.323 devices; identify the essential elements of a convergent network, and list the essential steps for qualifying a network's ability to support convergence; identify common G.7xx codecs and their bandwidth requirements in a converged environment; calculate and estimate bandwidth usage for various codecs, including considerations for overhead and connection quality; explain wireless convergence technologies, including Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications (DECT) and Personal Wireless Telephone (PWT); identify elements of the IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS); identify the features, benefits, problems and management of presenting; list unified messaging methods and benefits; identify common and essential videoconferencing codecs, standards and practices; explain the fundamentals of Internet Protocol television (IPTV); define latency, jitter and wander, and implement methods for reducing each; identify factors that affect the bandwidth of voice and video calls on convergent networks; analyze traffic in a convergent network, and resolve problems using a packet sniffer, monitoring software and hardware solutions; identify types and effects of attacks in convergent networks, including man-in-the-middle attacks, voice mail compromises, viruses, brute- force and dictionary attacks, zero-day attacks, illicit servers, toll fraud and unsolicited calls; and explain the practice and impact of VLAN hopping; and identify types of intrusion detection.

Instruction: 

Version 1: Course 1: Topics include: data networking; network operating systems; networking protocols; binding and configuring TCP/IP; LANs and WANs; wiring an RJ-45 cable; TCP/IP suite and internet addressing; TCP/IP protocols; local and remote destination node; converting internet addresses; determining default subnet masks; determining subnet masks and address ranges; determining network address ranges, subnet masks, and CIDR notation; configuring TCP/IP properties; TCP/IP troubleshooting; locating and viewing TCP/IP information in the protocol and services files; using the ping command; using the tracert program; identifying IP configuration and hardware address information; viewing the ARP cache; using the nbstat command. Version 2: Course 1: The Data Networking course covers the fundamentals of networking. Through hands-on training, participants will gain the networking skills and concepts required for entry-level professionals seeking employment in the Information Technology (IT) or the telecommunications industries. Version 1: Course 2: Telephony essentials; local telephone connections; the local loop; creating a telephone cable; infrastructure issues and standards; troubleshooting; testing tools; analog and digital signaling. Version 2: Course 2: The Telephony Networking course covers how to install and troubleshoot analog and digital phone lines in home and PBX installations. Participants will gain skills in basic telephony concepts, including earth-start and loop-start trunks, common telephony standards, and PBX elements. Version 1: Course 3: Industry standards and protocols; researching standards; enabling voice over IP; configuring Windows Net meeting for VoIP transmissions; conducting a VoIP call using Net meeting; network convergence; comparing codecs in a VoIP implementation. Version 2: Course 3: The Convergence Technologies course covers the fundamental concepts, standards and practices that combine telephony and data networks into convergence networks. Topics include industry standards and protocols, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), and network convergence.

Credit recommendation: 

Version 1: Course 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in a Technology or Telecommunications degree program or as a laboratory in a Technology or Telecommunications degree program, OR in the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours as a laboratory in a Trades curriculum (12/05). NOTE: Version 1: Course 1,2, and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. Version 2: Course 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in a Technology or Telecommunications degree program or as a laboratory in a Technology or Telecommunications degree program or in the associate degree/certificate category, 6 semester hours as a laboratory in a Trades curriculum (2/13 revalidation). NOTE: Version 2: Courses may be awarded discrete credit up to 2 semester hours each if taken separately. NOTE: This three-course sequence of the same name with course numbers (224 1, 2, and 3), and VoIP Convergence Technologies Series (216/316) overlap in content. Credit should be awarded for only one of these learning experiences, if a student should successfully complete more than one. course. *NOTE: Course numbers on transcripts may reflect different prefixes depending upon where a course is offered.

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