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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Signals Maintainer Training and Apprenticeship Program

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Transportation Learning Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, and approved locations.

Length:

Course 1, 2 and 3 (combined): 37 hours. 

Dates:

Course 1, 2 and 3: April 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe theory of operation and purpose of signaling; identify related elements of signaling; describe interference between territories with and without signaling systems; describe operation of types of signaling systems; describe equipment for train to wayside communication (TWC); identify signaling symbols recommended by American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of-way Association (AREMA); describe how overlay systems work; describe general operation of Automatic Block Signaling (ABS), Automatic block signaling uni-directionally, Automatic block signaling Bi-directionally, and Traffic Control Systems; develop a sequence of operation for an ABS; list the Automatic Train Control Subsystems;  describe operation of Automatic Train Protection, Automatic Train Operation and Automatic Train Supervision; describe operation of Radio Frequency Based Signaling; list and describe CBTC specific equipment; and inspect, maintain and repair cab and wayside signaling systems.

Instruction:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Instruction is offered via classroom through use of study guides, required and supplemental readings, quizzes, lab, required interaction with instructor, and final exams. Topics include: cab and wayside signaling systems, American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of-Way Association signaling symbols; overlay systems; Automatic Block Signaling; traffic control systems; and radio frequency based signaling.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Railroad Operations, Railroad Electronics, Railroad Engineering, Transportation Management, and Mechanical Systems (5/18). NOTE: Course 1, 2 and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. 

Location:

Transportation Learning Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, and approved locations.

Length:

Course 1, 2 and 3 (combined): 15 hours. 

Dates:

Course 1, 2 and 3: April 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze and compare the functions and components of mechanical interlocking machines to modern control panels; explain how control panels have evolved since the early 20th century by evaluating changes and technological advances; explain purpose and key functions of control panels for signaling purposes; list and describe control panel components; evaluate how functions of control panels differ at the mainline and interlockings/yards; read lock diagrams; describe types of communication interfaces; and inspect, repair and maintain control panels. 

Instruction:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Instruction is offered via classroom through use of study guides, required and supplemental readings, quizzes, lab, required interaction with instructor, and final exams. Topics include: control panel operations, functions and equipment; lock diagrams; communication interfaces; and inspection, repair and maintenance of control panels. 

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Railroad Operations, Railroad Electronics, Railroad Engineering, Transportation Management, and Mechanical Systems (5/18). NOTE: Course 1, 2 and 3 must all be completed to receive credit.

Location:

Transportation Learning Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, and approved locations.

Length:

Course 1, 2 and 3 (combined): 45.5 hours. 

Dates:

Course 1, 2 and 3: April 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify key highway grade crossing terminology and nomenclature; describe regulations pertaining to highway grade crossings; describe the principles of highway grade crossing operations; identify and describe highway grade crossing warning equipment; identify and describe highway grade crossing control circuits; identify types of warning system malfunctions, and inspect and maintain highway grade crossings.

Instruction:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Instruction is offered via classroom through use of study guides, required and supplemental readings, quizzes, lab, required interaction with instructor, and final exams. Topics include: highway grade crossing equipment, control circuits, warning systems and operations. 

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Railroad Operations, Railroad Electronics, Railroad Engineering, Transportation Management, and Mechanical Systems (5/18). NOTE: Courses 1, 2 and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. 

Location:

Transportation Learning Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, and approved locations.

Length:

Course 1, 2 and 3 (combined): 24 hours. 

Dates:

Course 1, 2 and 3: April 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define basic interlocking terminology and describe theory of operation and purpose of interlockings; identify the applicable FRA and agency-specific standards related to interlockings and safety guidelines; list nomenclature specific to interlockings; explain basic routing processing; evaluate types of locking circuits and their functions; differentiate between signal and universal interlockings, and inspect and maintain interlockings.

Instruction:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Instruction is offered via classroom through use of study guides, required and supplemental readings, quizzes, lab, required interaction with instructor, and final exams. Topics include: signal control circuits, interlockings, routing processing, and inspection, maintenance and repair of interlockings. 

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Railroad Operations, Railroad Electronics, Railroad Engineering, Transportation Management, and Mechanical Systems (5/18). NOTE: Course 1, 2 and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. 

Location:

Transportation Learning Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, and approved locations.

Length:

Course 1, 2 and 3 (combined): 32.5 hours. 

Dates:

Course 1, 2 and 3: April 2013 - Present.

Objectives:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify components for signaling power distribution and describe basic systems and principles of power distribution; evaluate types of backup power used in signal power distribution; explain power distribution schematics and power phases; and inspect, maintain and repair signaling power distribution equipment. 

Instruction:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Instruction is offered via classroom through use of study guides, required and supplemental readings, quizzes, lab, required interaction with instructor, and final exams. Topics include: signaling power distribution, backup power, and inspection, maintenance and repair of signal power distribution equipment. 

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Railroad Operations, Railroad Electronics, Railroad Engineering, Transportation Management, and Mechanical Systems (5/18). NOTE: Course 1, 2 and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. 

Location:

Transportation Learning Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, and approved locations.

Length:

Course 1, 2 and 3 (combined): 48 hours. 

Dates:

Course 1, 2 and 3: April 2013 - Present. 

Objectives:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe theory of operation and purpose of switches; identify related components of switches; differentiate between facing and railing; identify common switch symbols; evaluate and determine normal and reserve position of the switch; describe properties of switch layout as to be able to communicate with the track department; identify installation standards; describe various types of switch layouts and their features; identify normal and reverse configuration on the circuit controller; identify and describe different types of derails; and describe the operation and purpose of derails.

Instruction:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Instruction is offered via classroom through use of study guides, required and supplemental readings, quizzes, lab, required interaction with instructor, and final exams. Topics include: switches, facing, railing, switch symbols, switch layouts, circuit controllers, and inspection and maintenance of switches and derails. 

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Railroad Operations, Railroad Electronics, Railroad Engineering, Transportation Management, and Mechanical Systems (5/18). NOTE: Course 1, 2 and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. 

Location:

Transportation Learning Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, and approved locations.

Length:

Course 1, 2 and 3 (combined): 38 hours. 

Dates:

Course 1, 2, and 3: April 2013 - Present. 

Objectives:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain principles and operations of track circuits; identify major components found in track circuits and examine their functions; list basic components of rail structure; record types of track circuits; describe common types of track circuits; and inspect and maintain track circuits. 

Instruction:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Instruction is offered via classroom through use of study guides, required and supplemental readings, quizzes, lab, required interaction with instructor, and final exams. Topics include: track circuit operations, safety, inspection procedures, and maintenance techniques. 

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Railroad Operations, Railroad Electronics, Railroad Engineering, Transportation Management, and Mechanical Systems (5/18). NOTE: Course 1, 2 and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. 

Location:

Transportation Learning Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, and approved locations.

Length:

Course 1, 2 and 3 (combined):  44 hours.

Dates:

Course 1, 2, and 3: April 2013 -  Present. 

Objectives:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe principles of operation and purpose of train stops; differentiate between pneumatic and electric train stops; identify and describe types of train stops; identify and describe the purpose of a dragging equipment detector (DED) trip vane device; and inspect and maintain train stops. 

Instruction:

Course 1, 2 and 3: Instruction is offered via classroom through use of study guides, required and supplemental readings, quizzes, lab, required interaction with instructor, and final exams. Topics include: train stops, pneumatic and electric train stops, dragging equipment detector trip vane device, and inspection and maintenance of train stops.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2 and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Railroad Operations, Railroad Electronics, Railroad Engineering, Transportation Management, and Mechanical Systems (5/18). NOTE: Course 1, 2 and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. 

Location:

Transportation Learning Center, Silver Spring, Maryland, and approved locations.

Length:

27 hours.

Dates:

April 2013 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the purpose, history and evolution of railroad signaling systems; differentiate between tools used for mechanical and electrical maintenance tests; analyze and implement use of safety procedures and various forms of roadway worker protection; identify proper procedures for removing equipment from service; define the fundamentals of relays and other technical aspects related to railroad signaling systems; and properly prepare records and documentation.   

Instruction:

Instruction is offered via classroom through use of study guides, required and supplemental readings, quizzes, lab, required interaction with instructor, and final exams. Topics include: signaling systems, safety, worker protection, tracks, circuits, derails, train stops, grade crossings, interlockings, relays, circuit plans, and recordkeeping.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Railroad Operations, Railroad Electronics, Railroad Engineering, Transportation Management, and Mechanical Systems (5/18).

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