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National College Credit Recommendation Service

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Apprentice Program for Carpentry: Four Year Program

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Basic Print Reading (BC38A) or (GCC144); Advanced Print Reading (BC38B) or (GCC155): 35 hours (1 week).

Dates:

 Basic Print Reading (BC38A) or (GCC144); Advanced Print Reading (BC38B) or (GCC155): September 2002 - Present.

Objectives:

Basic Print Reading (GC38A) or (GCC144): Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand the language of blueprints; read and interpret lines, symbols, and details; and answer basic construction questions related to the layout and installation of materials at the job site. Advanced Print Reading (GC38B) or (GCC155): Students will be able to: develop additional accuracy in reading and interpreting blueprints; identify and locate material and equipment used during a commercial building project; and perform quantitative take-off and estimating of material. (This course expands and reinforces the principles introduced in Basic Print Reading).

Instruction:

Basic Print Reading (BC38A) or (GCC144): This course presents print reading fundamentals and print reading activities related to residential construction. The major topics covered in the course are concepts, symbols, abbreviations, and sketching principles in blueprints. Advanced Print Reading (BC38B) or (GCC155): This course focuses on commercial drawings and expands and reinforces the principles introduced in Basic Print Reading. The ability to read plumbing, electrical and mechanical drawings is a basic requirement for career advancement because it enables carpenters to coordinate on the job site with other trades. This course introduces apprentices to the many types of drawings and specifications that may be utilized for the construction of a project, including written specifications, foundation and floor plans, exterior and interior elevations, structural and mechanical plans, electrical plans, and a variety of schedules. This course also introduces layout and quantitative take off and estimating. (Prerequisite: Basic Print Reading).

Credit recommendation:

 Basic Print Reading (BC38A) or (GCC144); Advanced Print Reading (BC38B) or (GCC155): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as a technical elective in Carpentry or Construction Technology (11/07) (2/13 revalidation) (4/18 revalidation). NOTE: Both courses must be completed to receive credit.

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1: 35 hours (1 week). Version 2: 40 hours (1 week). 

Dates:

Version 1: September 2002 -  March 2018. Version 2: April 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe a rigger's safety responsibilities on the jobsite; describe the limits of safe equipment operation; describe the basic construction and standard designs of wire rope; calculate working load limit (WLL) for various cables; identify and employ safe practices when rigging with wire, rope, chain, and slings; identify the construction and purpose of hardware equipment; inspect rigging equipment using industry standard criteria; identify standard types of cranes used in rigging operations and assist in safe crane setup; identify load conditions that result in a critical life using a capacity chart; and direct crane movement for rigging operations using appropriate hand or voice signals. Version 2: Students will be able to: describe a rigger's safety responsibilities on the jobsite; describe the limits of safe equipment operation; describe the basic construction and standard designs of wire rope; calculate working load limit (WLL) for various cables; identify and employ safe practices when rigging with wire, rope, chain, and slings; identify the construction and purpose of hardware equipment; inspect rigging equipment using industry standard criteria; identify standard types of cranes used in rigging operations and assist in safe crane setup; identify load conditions that result in a critical life using a capacity chart; and direct crane movement for rigging operations using appropriate hand or voice signals.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course addresses rigging safety, rigging hardware construction, rigging hardware inspection, knots, and rigging procedures. Apprentices work with different types of cranes and direct crane movements through voice and hand signals.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Carpentry or Construction Technology (11/07) (2/13 revalidation) (4/18 revalidation). 

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY or approved work sites.
Length:
144 hours per year (576 hours total) of instruction; in addition, a minimum of 1,300 hours of approved work experience/internship (minimum 5,200 total work hours).
Dates:
September 2002 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the program, students will be able to incorporate all learner outcomes from the four years of training. 

Instruction:

Instruction focuses on major topics covered in the four year program. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 11 semester hours in Construction Management distributed as follows: 2 semester hours in Engineering Drawing, 3 semester hours as Introduction to Methods and Materials of Construction, 3 semester hours as an Apprenticeship, and 3 semester hours as a Technical Elective (11/07) (2/13 revalidation) (4/18 revalidation). NOTE: Credit  recommendations are only valid for students who began the apprenticeship program in the fall of 2002 or later and have successfully completed ALL courses. 

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:
48 hours (12 weeks).
Dates:
September 2002 - Present.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss welding hazards and the safety measures required to guard against them on a construction site; discuss the electrode classification system; explain and properly use the electrode holders, guns, and torches appropriate to different types of welding and cutting; recognize the required and optional welding symbols and their instructions; describe welding techniques used with shielded metal arc welding (SMAW); and interpret bead examples.
Instruction:
This course provides current welding information and techniques to prepare students for employment in the welding field as well as for individuals who wish to upgrade their welding skills. Apprentices learn to operate basic equipment used in shielded metal arc welding and oxy-acetylene cutting, and are instructed in the choice of proper electrodes. Topics include terminology, critical temperatures, welding distortion and defects, blueprint reading for welders and joint design. The course combines lecture and lab and prepares students for industry certification exams.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours as a technical elective in Carpentry or Construction Technology (11/07) (2/13 revalidation) (4/18 revalidation).

Location:

The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY

Length:

Version 1:  Basic Drywall Applications, Advanced Drywall Applications, Basic Acoustical Ceilings, Advanced Acoustical Ceilings, Interior Finish I, Interior Finish II: 35 hours (1 week), Solid Surfaces: 18 hours (3 days).

Version 2: Basic Drywall Applications, Advanced Drywall Applications, Basic Acoustical Ceilings, Advanced Acoustical Ceilings, Doors and  Hardware, Interior Finish I, Interior Finish II: 35 hours (1 week), Solid Surfaces: 18 hours (3 days).

Version 3: Basic Drywall Applications, Advanced Drywall Applications, Basic Acoustical Ceilings, Advanced Acoustical Ceilings, Doors and Hardware, Interior Finish I, Interior Finish II:  35 hours (1 week).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2002 - August 2006; Version 2: September 2006 - October 2007; Version 3: November 2007 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Basic Drywall Applications (BC32A) or (GCC211): Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and explain the proper applications of materials used in metal framing and drywall applications; identify and demonstrate the safe and proper use of metal stud and drywall-related hand and power tools; demonstrate the proper layout and construction of metal stud walls and the application of drywall. Advanced Drywall Applications (BC32B) or (GCC222): Students will be able to: expand their knowledge of partition layout and installation methods through hands-on layout projects to create door openings, fascias, soffits, octagonal windows, archways, and radius partition walls. (This course builds on the basic principles governing metal framing and drywall installation explored and practiced in Basic Drywall). Basic Acoustical Ceilings (BC33A) or (GCC233): Students will be able to: identify common grid ceiling components; read blueprints and specifications to determine the type and height of ceiling, location of soffits and window and curtain pockets, related electrical and mechanical features, and layout; identify the tools needed to install an acoustical ceiling; demonstrate the ability to lay out a grid ceiling with equal borders in a given area; lay out specific ceiling types using standard tile sizes; describe the installation process for exposed grid; list the procedures used to build grid soffits; and install acoustical ceilings in a timely and safe manner. Advanced Acoustical Ceilings (BC33B) or (GC244): Students will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of the different types of concealed systems; identify which system is used most often today; calculate the proper layout for equal borders on the tile and location of the grid components; install a concealed grid ceiling, including an access panel and border tiles with equal borders; identify metal ceiling system components; correctly use shop drawings and jobsite prints and understand how they work together; perform some specific installation techniques; and identify special tools needed and explain the installation procedures used for each system.  Interior Finish I (BC36A) or (GCC411): Students will be able to: safely operate appropriate hand and power tools used for interior finish work; establish consistent elevations using story poles and benchmarks; identify elevations, plan views, section views, windows, doors, ceiling, and base; demonstrate correct layout and installation procedures for interior components such as cabinets, moldings, and countertops; and describe the various materials and fasteners used in finish work. Interior Finish II (BC36B) or (GCC422):  Students will be able to: safely operate appropriate hand and power tools used for interior finish work; establish consistent elevations using story poles and benchmarks; understand principles and procedures for door frame installation and door swing; identify elevations, plan views, section views, and details of shop drawings for wood work installation; and describe various materials and fasteners used in panel installation and wood doors and frames. Solid Surfaces (BC31B)or (GCC533): Students will be able to: identify major solid surface manufacturers and their products; successfully fabricate an L-shaped solid surface countertop; explain the need for planning prior to fabrication and installation of solid surface product; demonstrate the safe use of tools and equipment necessary for constructing solid surface products; list solid surface products and their uses; and understand and apply various seaming procedures associated with solid surface manufacturers and their products. 

Version 2: Basic Drywall Applications (BC32A) or (GCC211): Students will be able to: identify and explain the proper applications of materials used in metal framing and drywall applications; identify and demonstrate the safe and proper use of metal stud and drywall-related hand and power tools; demonstrate the proper layout and construction of metal stud walls and the application of drywall. Advanced Drywall Applications (BC32B) or (GCC222): Students will be able to: expand their knowledge of partition layout and installation methods through hands-on layout projects to create door openings, fascias, soffits, octagonal windows, archways, and radius partition walls. (This course builds on the basic principles governing metal framing and drywall installation explored and practiced in Basic Drywall). Basic Acoustical Ceilings (BC33A) or (GCC233): Students will be able to: identify common grid ceiling components; read blueprints and specifications to determine the type and height of ceiling, location of soffits and window and curtain pockets, related electrical and mechanical features, and layout; identify the tools needed to install an acoustical ceiling; demonstrate the ability to lay out a grid ceiling with equal borders in a given area; lay out specific ceiling types using standard tile sizes; describe the installation process for exposed grid; list the procedures used to build grid soffits; and install acoustical ceilings in a timely and safe manner. Advanced Acoustical Ceilings (BC33B) or (GC244): Students will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of the different types of concealed systems; identify which system is used most often today; calculate the proper layout for equal borders on the tile and location of the grid components; install a concealed grid ceiling, including an access panel and border tiles with equal borders; identify metal ceiling system components; correctly use shop drawings and jobsite prints and understand how they work together; perform some specific installation techniques; and identify special tools needed and explain the installation procedures used for each system. Doors and Hardware (BC31A) or (GCC433): Students will be able to: use various types of hanging devices and proper procedures for door preparation to create doors with perfect swing; read hardware schedules to manufacture templates to undercut doors, gain hinges, install lock edge plates and cylinders on doors; identify lever locations; fit doors by planning and undercutting for proper installation and use templates to machine doors for the installation of hardware. Interior Finish I (BC36A) or (GCC411): Students will be able to: safely operate appropriate hand and power tools used for interior finish work; establish consistent elevations using story poles and benchmarks; identify elevations, plan views, section views, windows, doors, ceiling, and base; demonstrate correct layout and installation procedures for interior components such as cabinets, moldings, and countertops; and describe the various materials and fasteners used in finish work. Interior Finish II (BC36B) or (GCC422): Students will be able to: safely operate appropriate hand and power tools used for interior finish work; establish consistent elevations using story poles and benchmarks; understand principles and procedures for door frame installation and door swing; identify elevations, plan views, section views, and details of shop drawings for wood work installation; and describe various materials and fasteners used in panel installation and wood doors and frames. Solid Surfaces (BC31B) or (GCC533): Students will be able to: identify major solid surface manufacturers and their products; successfully fabricate an L-shaped solid surface countertop; explain the need for planning prior to fabrication and installation of solid surface product; demonstrate the safe use of tools and equipment necessary for constructing solid surface products; list solid surface products and their uses; and understand and apply various seaming procedures associated with solid surface manufacturers and their products. 

Version 3: Basic Drywall Applications (BC32A) or (GCC211): Students will be able to: identify and explain the proper applications of materials used in metal framing and drywall applications; identify and demonstrate the safe and proper use of metal stud and drywall-related hand and power tools; demonstrate the proper layout and construction of metal stud walls and the application of drywall. Advanced Drywall Applications (BC32B) or (GCC222): Students will be able to: expand their knowledge of partition layout and installation methods through hands-on layout projects to create door openings, fascias, soffits, octagonal windows, archways, and radius partition walls. (This course builds on the basic principles governing metal framing and drywall installation explored and practiced in Basic Drywall). Basic Acoustical Ceilings (BC33A) or (GCC233): Students will be able to: identify common grid ceiling components; read blueprints and specifications to determine the type and height of ceiling, location of soffits and window and curtain pockets, related electrical and mechanical features, and layout; identify the tools needed to install an acoustical ceiling; demonstrate the ability to lay out a grid ceiling with equal borders in a given area; lay out specific ceiling types using standard tile sizes; describe the installation process for exposed grid; list the procedures used to build grid soffits; and install acoustical ceilings in a timely and safe manner. Advanced Acoustical Ceilings (BC33B) or (GC244): Students will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of the different types of concealed systems; identify which system is used most often today; calculate the proper layout for equal borders on the tile and location of the grid components; install a concealed grid ceiling, including an access panel and border tiles with equal borders; identify metal ceiling system components; correctly use shop drawings and jobsite prints and understand how they work together; perform some specific installation techniques; and identify special tools needed and explain the installation procedures used for each system. Doors and Hardware (BC31A) or (GCC433): Students will be able to: use various types of hanging devices and proper procedures for door preparation to create doors with perfect swing; read hardware schedules to manufacture templates to undercut doors, gain hinges, install lock edge plates and cylinders on doors; identify lever locations; fit doors by planning and undercutting for proper installation and use templates to machine doors for the installation of hardware. Interior Finish I (BC36A) or (GCC411): Students will be able to: safely operate appropriate hand and power tools used for interior finish work; establish consistent elevations using story poles and benchmarks; identify elevations, plan views, section views, windows, doors, ceiling, and base; demonstrate correct layout and installation procedures for interior components such as cabinets, moldings, and countertops; and describe the various materials and fasteners used in finish work. Interior Finish II (BC36B) or (GCC422): Students will be able to: safely operate appropriate hand and power tools used for interior finish work; establish consistent elevations using story poles and benchmarks; understand principles and procedures for door frame installation and door swing; identify elevations, plan views, section views, and details of shop drawings for wood work installation; and describe various materials and fasteners used in panel installation and wood doors and frames. 

Instruction:

Version 1: Basic Drywall Applications (BC32A) or (GCC211): This course introduces apprentices to the basic principles governing metal framing and drywall application. Advanced Drywall Applications (BC32B) or (GCC222): Major topics include: drywall installation over metal framing studs is the most common drywall application in commercial construction projects. This course builds upon the basic principles governing metal framing and drywall installation explored and practiced in Basic Drywall. Apprentices expand their knowledge of partition layout and installation methods through hands-on layout projects to create door openings, fascias, soffits, octagonal windows, archways, and radius partition walls. Basic Acoustical Ceilings (BC33A) or (GCC233): This course introduces apprentices to the job planning aspect of acoustical ceiling installation, including print reading, materials handling and storage, tools and personal protective equipment, and layout. Apprentices learn the purpose of various acoustic ceiling components and how they are used together through the hands-on installation of a typical grid ceiling system. Advanced Acoustical Ceilings (BC33B) or (GCC244): This course builds upon the applications and techniques in Basic Acoustical Ceilings with the addition of more complex systems such as concealed z-bar, concealed grid, metal and specialty systems. Students learn to use manufacturers’ shop drawings in conjunction with architectural prints to develop a systematic approach to print reading that will enable them to efficiently layout and install more advanced acoustical ceilings systems. Interior Finish I (BC36A) or (GCC411): This course introduces procedures for identification, estimation, and installation of interior trim. Topics include: blue prints and specifications; material and tools used for interior finish work; and various components of interior systems. Apprentices learn the purpose and application of benchmarks: how to create and measure from them, and how to relate them back to the prints. Hands-on projects include the installation of crown molding and commercial cabinets, and the fabrication and installation of counter tops. Interior Finish II (BC36B) or (GCC422): This course introduces procedures for identification, estimation, and installation of interior trim with increased attention to detail and accuracy in print reading and layout. Apprentices install architectural panels using a z-clip method. Apprentices also install and fabricate jambs; fit and hang wood doors using various types of hinges including off-set pivots, center pivots, and butt hinges. Also included is the installation of lock and latch sets. Solid Surfaces (BC31B) or (GCC533): This course covers how to use solid surface materials in many different environments and how to create countertops, back splashes and edges. Seam creation and placement is addressed, as well as how and when the solid surface material can be used in the commercial and residential setting. This course combines lecture and lab prepares apprentices for solid surface installation certification. Version 2: Instruction is the same as Version 1 and 3, with the addition of Doors and Hardware (BC31A) or (GCC433): This course refines apprentices' ability to intrepret the architectural and technical information related to door installation.  Version 3: Instruction is the same as Version 1 and 2 but without Solid Surfaces (BC31B) or (GCC533).

Credit recommendation:

Version 1:  Basic Drywall Applications, Advanced Drywall Applications, Basic Acoustical Ceilings, Advanced Acoustical Ceilings, Interior Finish I, Interior Finish II,  Solid Surfaces; Version 2:  Basic Drywall Applications, Advanced Drywall Applications, Basic Acoustical Ceilings, Advanced Acoustical Ceilings, Doors and Hardware, Interior Finish I, Interior Finish II,  Solid Surfaces; Version 3: Basic Drywall Applications, Advanced Drywall Applications, Basic Acoustical Ceilings, Advanced Acoustical Ceilings, Doors and Hardware, Interior Finish I, Interior Finish II:  In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 7 semester hours (3 lecture, 4 laboratory) in Carpentry or Construction Technology (11/07) (2/13 revalidation) (4/18 revalidation). NOTE: All courses listed in each version must be completed to receive credit.

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:

House Framing I (BC37A) or (GCC333); House Framing II (BC37B) or (GCC344): 35 hours (1 week).

Dates:

House Framing I (BC37A) or (GCC333); House Framing II (BC37B) or (GCC344): September 2002 - Present.

Objectives:

House Framing I (BC37A) or (GCC333): Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain how floor, wall, and ceiling framing members work as a unit to form a sound structure; outline the principles of load transfer; outline proper layout and installation procedures for various floor and wall systems; cite installation procedures for plywood sub-floors and exterior sheathing; and outline installation procedures for exterior doors and windows. House Framing II (BC37B) or (GCC344): Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify types of roofs and their purposes; identify and describe roof framing materials; describe roof layout and construction; identify rafter types and layout procedures; outline dormer preparation and installation procedures; identify safe practice procedures for sheathing, flashing, and roofing; and outline safe practice procedures for dismantling a roof structure.

Instruction:

House Framing I (BC37A) or (GCC333): This course is a combination of lab and lecture introduces apprentices to wood floor and wall framing systems used in residential construction. This includes installation procedures for structural elements such as girders, beams, headers and engineered lumber. Layout and installation procedures for stairwells, door and window openings and exterior finishes are also covered. House Framing II (BC37B) or (GCC334): Building upon the construction methods and principles practiced in House Framing I, this course introduces apprentices to the types of roofing systems and exterior finishes used on residential buildings. Roof ventilation and flashing are also covered. Apprentices construct a gable roof, hip and valley roof, and a shed dormer roof. Special attention is given to the framing square, a tool essential in the layout and calculation of roof framing members.

Credit recommendation:

House Framing I (BC37A) or (GCC333); House Framing II (BC37B) or (GCC344): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours (3 lecture, 1 laboratory) in Carpentry or Construction Technology (11/07) (2/13 revalidation) (4/18 revalidation). NOTE: Both courses must be completed to receive credit.

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1:  ICRA: Best Practices in Health Care Construction (GCC555): 24 hours (3 weeks).

Version 2: ICRA: Best Practices in Health Care Construction (GCC555): 24 hours (3 weeks); Introduction to Storefronts and Architectural Metal Awareness (GCC566): 11 hours (1 week).  Introduction to New York City Concrete Infrastructure: 35 hours (1 week). 

Dates:

Version 1: ICRA: Best Practices in Health Care Construction (GCC555): September 2008 - August 2017.

Version 2: Introduction to Storefronts and Architectural Metal Awareness (GCC566); Introduction to Storefronts and Architectural Metal Awareness (GCC566); Introduction to New York City Concrete Infrastructure: September 2017 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: ICRA: Best Practices in Health Care Construction (GCC555): Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe why health care facilities are unique work environments and why extra precautions must be taken; explain functions and responsibilities of the ICRA team and how the team is used to determine a work area classification; explain the differences between positive, equal, and negative pressure and how air pressure affects contaminants; recognize how airborne contaminants are isolated and controlled; define work practice procedures used in a health care facility; identify agencies and organizations who oversee health care facilities; identify different types of barriers and their purposes; and describe four methods used for mold remediation and list the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and work practices needed for mold remediation in a health care facility. Introduction to Storefronts and Architectural Metal Awareness (GCC566): Students will be able to: differentiate between a storefront and curtain wall and identify different types of installation systems; explain the process of job planning for a storefront or curtain wall; identify the components that make up a storefront or curtain wall; identify the different types of prints and schedules used with storefronts and curtain walls; describe the components for the stick built and screw spline systems; differentiate between the types of glazing and demonstrate an understanding of how to install each type; and identify the specialty items common to storefronts and curtain walls. Introduction to New York City Concrete Infrastructure (GCC577): Students will be able to: fabricate, install and dismantle formwork used in concrete infrastructure construction using proven work practices; explain the purpose of concrete formwork and its uses; understand basic blueprints and sketch readings as it pertains to concrete; and understand the fundamental aspects of concrete formwork, including formwork materials names and techniques.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: ICRA: Best Practices in Health Care Construction (GCC555): The overall goal of the course is to promote student awareness of infection control and protection methods in health care facilities and to promote safe work practices for students who are working in these types of facilities. Instruction also covers renovations and additions to existing, occupied buildings.Introduction to Storefronts and Architectural Metal Awareness (GCC566): Major topics include: types of installation systems; job planning for a storefront or curtain wall; components that make up a storefront or curtain wall;  types of prints and schedules used with storefronts and curtain walls; and glazing. Introduction to New York City Concrete Infrastructure (GCC577): Major topics include concrete and blueprints for concrete, along with fabrication, installation, and dismantling of formwork.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: ICRA: Best Practices in Health Care Construction (GCC555): In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour as Technical Elective in Carpentry or Construction Technology (2/13). NOTE: If taken with New Apprentice Training (NAT 123), in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as Technical Elective in Carpentry or Construction Technology (2/13). 

Version 2:  ICRA: Best Practices in Health Care Construction (GCC555); Introduction to Storefronts and Architectural Metal Awareness (GCC566); Introduction to New York City Concrete Infrastructure (GCC577):  In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours as Technical Elective in Carpentry or Construction Technology (4/18). NOTE: ICRA: Best Practices in Health Care Construction (GCC555) and Introduction to Storefronts and Architectural Metal Awareness (GCC566) are taught in a 35-hour week format in the first half of the semester and Introduction to New York City Concrete Infrastructure (GCC577) is taught the second half of the same semester. All three courses must be completed to receive credit (4/18). 

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 35 hours (1 week).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2002 -  March 2018. Version 2: April 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate the basic skills to complete each of the following: install metal framing with drywall applications; hang suspended acoustical ceilings; fabricate basic concrete forms; demonstrate correct handling of measuring, cutting, and fastening tools associated with each task; identify the key symbols of, and correctly interpret and apply to basic schematic drawings; state carpentry principles and demonstrate the safe and proper use of hand tools and power tools.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course introduces apprentices to the most common occupational skills areas of the concrete, wall, and ceilings industry. The course provides apprentices with a theoretical and practical framework for skills acquisition that increases their employability and forms a basis for the various other skills they will learn throughout their carpentry career. Apprentices use basic hand and power tools to participate in the following projects: drywall metal framing and drywall application; and suspended ceiling layout and grid installation. This course is a prerequisite for more advanced instruction in these skill areas conducted during the second and third year of apprenticeship.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Carpentry or Construction Technology (11/07) (2/13 revalidation)  NOTE: If taken with Introduction to Health and Safety (BC64) or (GCC111), in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as a Technical Elective in Carpentry or Construction Technology (2/13). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Carpenty or Construction Technology (4/18 revalidation). NOTE: Introduction to Health and Safety (BC64) or (GCC111) is no longer offered (4/18). 

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 21 hours (1 week).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2012 -  March 2018. Version 2: April 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and define physical and health hazards and toxicity of chemicals; recognize an emergency situation and take appropriate steps to prevent injury; perform basic first aid and secure injured person(s) until emergency personnel arrive; identify and demonstrate standard precautions to reduce the risk of disease transmission; list the responsibilities of a competent and qualified person and various government and private agencies who monitor and regulate scaffold erection; describe various types of fall protection systems utilized by scaffold users, erectors, and dismantlers; state the principles governing the use of powder activated tools, including correct firing and maintenance; pass a HILTI Powder Actuated Tool Operator's Exam; provide a broad understanding of what green building is and what it is not (challenges, advantages, and disadvantages); and adopt a general understanding of the structure of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America (UBCJA), including International, District Council, Local Unions, Bylaws, Constitution, Consent Decree, Stipulation, and Order.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Training is conducted by OSHA-certified instructors and begins with an introduction to the federal regulatory requirements that govern worksite safety and conditions. Students are introduced to scaffolding systems and their regulations, standards, and safety issues and provided with HILTI Power Actuated Tool Training. The course transitions into green building and ends with trade union awareness. Upon successful completion of the course, apprentices are awarded the OSHA 10-hour Construction Industry Certificate, the 4-hour Supported Scaffold User Certification, and the HILTI Power Actuated Tool Operator Certification.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour as a Technical Elective in Carpentry or Construction Technology (2/13). NOTE: If taken with ICRA: Health Care in Construction (GCC555), in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as a Technical Elective in Carpentry or Construction Technology (2/13). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour as a Technical Elective in Carpentry or Construction Technology (4/18 revalidation). 

Location:
The New York City District Council of Carpenters, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY.
Length:
35 hours (1 week).
Dates:
September 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to learn and apply the federal regulatory requirements for worker safety on construction sites.

Instruction:

This course creates awareness of hazards associated with the construction site and instructs apprentices with the knowledge and skills necessary to minimize injury. It covers federal regulatory requirements that govern work site safety and conditions. Upon successful completion of the course, apprentices will be awarded the OSHA 30-Hour Construction Industry Certificate.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Carpentry or related disciplines (2/13) (4/18 revalidation). 

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