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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Northwell Health Emergency Medical Institute | Evaluated Learning Experience

Paramedic - Original

Formerly Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course or EMT - Paramedic Original
Location: 
Northwell Health, Lake Success, NY.
Length: 

Version 1: 896 hours (12 months): includes 472 hours didactic, 272 hours clinical, and 152 hours field internship. Version 2: 1,252 hours (13 months): includes 616 hours didactic, 336 hours clinical, and 300 hours field internship. Version 3: 1,212 hours (14 months): includes 344 hours didactic, 680 hours clinical, and 188 hours supervised laboratory. Version 4: 1,200 -1,360 hours (12 months): includes 380 hours didactic, 200 hours skills/simulation/standardized patient encounters; 100+ clinical patient encounters (600 hours); 36+ field internship patient encounters (80 hours). Version 5: 1,300 hours (15 months): includes 390 hours didactic; 250 hours skills/simulation/standardized patient encounters; 100+ clinical patient encounters; 36+ field internship patient encounters (125 hours). 

Dates: 

Version 1: April 1997 - July 2001. Version 2: August 2001 - March 2006. Version 3: April 2006 - July 2012. Version 4: August 2012 -  March 2018. Version 5: April 2018 - Present.

Instructional delivery format: 
Hybrid course/exam
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: appropriately assess and correctly treat a single or multiple systems trauma patient in any given situation; appropriately assess and correctly treat a patient suffering from a medical emergency including conditions involving the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, nervous system, muscular system, skeletal system, integumentary system, endocrine system, digestive system, genitourinary system, and reproductive system; discuss the principles used in treating medical emergencies involving pediatrics, obstetrics, neonates, shock, behavioral disorders, toxicology, alcoholism and drug abuse, geriatrics, anaphylaxis, and infectious diseases; perform the following skills at the appropriate time in the correct situation: airway control and ventilation, endotracheal intubation; intravenous cannulation, administration of medications by intravenous, intramuscular or subcutaneous route, defibrillation, EKG interpretation, chest decompression, emergency cricothyrotomy, application of pneumatic antishock garment (PASG), fixation and traction splinting, bandaging, spinal immobilization and use of other devices appropriate to the care of the sick and injured; demonstrate disentanglement of a patient, packaging and removal from the scene, radio communications with medical control and use of report writing skills; discuss and demonstrate the roles and responsibilities of the paramedic in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job. Version 4:  Students will be able to: appropriately assess and correctly treat a single or multiple systems trauma patient in any given situation; appropriately assess and correctly treat a patient suffering from a medical emergency including conditions involving the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, nervous system, muscular system, skeletal system, integumentary system, endocrine system, digestive system, genitourinary system, and reproductive system; discuss the principles used in treating medical emergencies involving pediatrics, obstetrics, neonates, shock, behavioral disorders, toxicology, alcoholism and drug abuse, geriatrics, anaphylaxis, and infectious diseases; perform the following skills at the appropriate time in the correct situation: airway management (including endotracheal intubation and supraglottic airways); direct laryngescopy (foreign body airway obstruction); percutaneious cricothyrotomy; ;pleural decompression; BiPAP/CPAP/PEEP; chest tube monitoring, ETC02 monitoring; NG/OG tubes; ECG and 12-Lead ECG interpretation; blood chemistry analysis; IO insertion; administration of approved medications through various routes; access indwelling catheters and implanted central IV ports; medications by IV infusion; maintenance of blood and blood product infusions; blood sampling; and cardioversion/defibrillation; utilize therapeutic communication and demonstrate cultural competency; communicate effectively with others, including with medical control-to-faciliate patient care; demonstrate professionalism and complex decision making; demonstrate accurate and appropriate record keeping and writing skills; and demonstrate scene leadership and safety. 

Instruction: 

Version 1: This program is designed to provide the advanced education needed by paramedics to administer patient care in the pre-hospital setting. This program covers all techniques of advanced emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the paramedic as well as all operational aspects of the job which students are expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illness and injuries, and application of proper procedures of advanced emergency care. Demonstration, practice, clinical, and field experiences are carefully integrated with the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of six divisions: pre-hospital environment, preparatory, trauma, medical emergencies, obstetrics/gynecology, and behavioral emergencies. Graduates of the program are entitled to sit for the New York State Paramedic Certification Examination. Version 2 and 3: This program is designed to provide the advanced education needed by paramedics to administer patient care in the pre-hospital setting. This program covers all techniques of advanced emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the paramedic as well as all operational aspects of the job which students are expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illness and injuries, and application of proper procedures of advanced emergency care. Demonstration, practice, clinical, and field experiences are carefully integrated with the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of 8 divisions: preparatory, airway management, patient assessment, trauma, medical, special considerations, assessment based management, operations. In addition, an expanded treatment of anatomy and physiology of the human body systems is included. Graduates of the program are entitled to sit for the New York State Paramedic Certification Examination. Version 4: This program was restructured to meet the newly released National EMS Education Guidelines and incorporate assessments of all educational domains (cognitive, psychomotor, and affective). Stand alone psychomotor activities have been integrated with standardized patients and simulation exercises. Regimented linear assessment and protocol adherence has been replaced with complex problem solving and differential diagnostic assessment and treatment. Primary classroom lecture as a form of didactic material presentation has been replaced with case-based and team-based learning assignments geared toward immediate application of concepts and practice. The program utilizes a BioSkill laboratory for application of adult airway assessment and skills on human specimens. Students receive an introduction to research for adoption and understanding of evidence-based practice. Team-based methodologies are being used to build teamwork and interpersonal relationship skills. Information technologies have also been integrated to allow the students to electronically send reports and documents as well as utilize web-based applications and information sources for advancing their education. Graduates of the program are entitled to sit for the New York State Paramedic Practical Skills and Written Examinations. Version 5: The program is now delivered in a blended or hybrid format with a significant amount of learning being conducted on-line.  The course follows an academy-style program where most of the didactic material and skills are completed in the first 10 months.  Clinical experiences are initiated by the fourth month of the program and completed by the end of the tenth month.  Fieldwork is completed by the twelfth month and the field internship period completed prior to the scheduled Practical Skills Evaluation (PSE) during the last month of the program.  Total course length has been extended to approximately 15 months due to student request/inability to complete clinical and field requirements within a 12-month format.

Credit recommendation: 

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 32 semester hours in Allied Health Sciences distributed as follows: 22 lecture, 5 clinical, and 5 field experience. Version 2 or 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 37 semester hours distributed as follows: 22 lecture, 7 clinical, and 5 field experience in Allied Health Sciences, and 3 in Anatomy and Physiology (no lab) or Human Biology (no lab) (1/03) (3/08 revalidation). Version 4 and 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 44 semester hours distributed as follows: 38 semester hours in Paramedic Sciences, Health Sciences, or Allied Health Sciences, and 3 semester hours in Pharmacology and 3 semester hours in Anatomy and Physiology (no lab) or Human Biology (no lab) (3/13 revalidation) (4/18 revalidation). 

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