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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Newark School of Theology | Evaluated Learning Experience

Theologies of Liberation

Location: 
Newark School of Theology,Two Park Place, Newark, New Jersey.
Length: 

Version 1 and 2: 45 hours (15 weeks).

Dates: 

Version 1: January 1999 - March 2007. Version 2: April 2007 - December 2016.

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand and explain the meaning of the phrase "the Church's preferential option for the poor;" understand and explain the Church's resistance to all forms of oppression as grounded in the teachings and practice of Jesus Christ; know how to recognize and analyze situations of oppression by using biblical and theological resources together with tools of analysis that come from sociology, political science, economics, and feminist theory; and use the analytical tools one needs to begin doing liberation theology in one's own context. Version 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: understand and explain the meaning of the phrase "the Church's preferential option for the poor;" understand and explain the Church's resistance to all forms of oppression as grounded in the teachings and practice of Jesus Christ; know how to recognize and analyze situations of oppression by using biblical and theological resources together with tools of analysis that come from sociology, political science, economics, and feminist theory; and use the analytical tools one needs to begin doing liberation theology in one's own context.

Instruction: 

Version 1: Major topics are: Introduction to Latin American Liberation Theology (Gutierrez); Introduction to Black Liberation Theology (Cone); Two Fathers of Black Liberation Theology in the United States (Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X); Introduction to Feminist Theory (Welch); Liberation Theology and the issues of suffering and sexual assault; and Liberation Theology and the Ethics of Love and Reconciliation. Methods of instruction include: assignments prior to class which students are responsible for presenting to the whole class for exposition and then a general discussion of the analysis of the text, as well as its relationship to lived experience. The faculty member guides the discussion, as necessary, as well as evaluates student's progress. There are also numerous short written assignments as well as a final examination. NOTE: For the graduate level recommendation, the student must already possess a baccalaureate degree and submit a 15-20 page graduate level paper at the completion of the course. Version 2: Major topics are: Introduction to Latin American Liberation Theology (Gutierrez); Introduction to Black Liberation Theology (Cone); Two Fathers of Black Liberation Theology in the United States (Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X); Introduction to Feminist Theory (Welch); Liberation Theology and the issues of suffering and sexual assault; and Liberation Theology and the Ethics of Love and Reconciliation. Methods of instruction include: assignments prior to class which students are responsible for presenting to the whole class for exposition and then a general discussion of the analysis of the text, as well as its relationship to lived experience. The faculty member guides the discussion, as necessary, as well as evaluates student's progress. There are also numerous short written assignments as well as a final examination. NOTE: For the graduate level recommendation, the student must already possess a baccalaureate degree and submit a 15-20 page graduate level paper at the completion of the course.

Credit recommendation: 

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Liberation Theology, Theology, or Religion (10/10). Version 2: In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Liberation Theology, Theology, or Religion (10/10).

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