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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Newark School of Theology | Evaluated Learning Experience

Ancient Israel (Old Testament): Part I

Location: 
Newark School of Theology,Two Park Place, Newark, New Jersey
Length: 

Version 1 and 2: 45 hours (15 weeks).

Dates: 

Version 1: September 1998 - March 2007. Version 2: April 2007 - December 2016.

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 1: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: understand and articulate how contemporary Biblical scholars interpret Biblical texts; identify various literary methods that are applied to the study of the Hebrew Bible and some major results of the application of these methods; know the literary history and major sources of the Hebrew Bible; know the history of ancient Israel (to the extent contemporary scholarship can reconstruct it) from its origins to the rise of the early Israelite monarchy; describe the three major models of the origins of ancient Israel and have an initial understanding of how these models imply different interpretations of the meaning of the Hebrew Bible; read the primary sources for the study of ancient Israel using the methods of interpretation of contemporary Biblical scholarship. Version 2: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: understand and articulate how contemporary Biblical scholars interpret Biblical texts; identify various literary methods that are applied to the study of the Hebrew Bible and some major results of the application of these methods; know the literary history and major sources of the Hebrew Bible; know the history of ancient Israel (to the extent contemporary scholarship can reconstruct it) from its origins to the rise of the early Israelite monarchy; describe the three major models of the origins of ancient Israel and have an initial understanding of how these models imply different interpretations of the meaning of the Hebrew Bible; read the primary sources for the study of ancient Israel using the methods of interpretation of contemporary Biblical scholarship.

Instruction: 

Version 1: Major topics are: various ways of viewing the Hebrew Bible (Angles of Vision); the historical world of the Hebrew Bible (the Ancient Near-East); the literary history of the Hebrew Bible; the primary sources for Israel's Premonarchic History; Ancestor traditions found in the books of Genesis-Numbers; traditions concerning Moses; the Religion of Moses and the Exodus-Wilderness Israelites; traditions of Inter-tribal Confederacy found in Joshua and Judges; the primary sources for Israel's monarchic history and the rise of monarchy in ancient Israel. Methods of instruction include: assignments prior to class which students are responsible for presenting to the whole class for exposition and then a general discussion of the analysis of the text, as well as its relationship to lived experience. The faculty member guides the discussion, as necessary, as well as evaluates student's progress. There are also numerous short written assignments as well as a final examination. NOTE: For the graduate level recommendation, the student must already possess a baccalaureate degree and submit a 15-20 page graduate level paper at the completion of the course. Version 2: Major topics are: various ways of viewing the Hebrew Bible (Angles of Vision); the historical world of the Hebrew Bible (the Ancient Near-East); the literary history of the Hebrew Bible; the primary sources for Israel's Premonarchic History; Ancestor traditions found in the books of Genesis-Numbers; traditions concerning Moses; the Religion of Moses and the Exodus-Wilderness Israelites; traditions of Inter-tribal Confederacy found in Joshua and Judges; the primary sources for Israel's monarchic history and the rise of monarchy in ancient Israel. Methods of instruction include: assignments prior to class which students are responsible for presenting to the whole class for exposition and then a general discussion of the analysis of the text, as well as its relationship to lived experience. The faculty member guides the discussion, as necessary, as well as evaluates student's progress. There are also numerous short written assignments as well as a final examination. NOTE: For the graduate level recommendation, the student must already possess a baccalaureate degree and submit a 15-20 page graduate level paper at the completion of the course.

Credit recommendation: 

Version 1: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Ancient Israel 1, Biblical Studies, or Religion (10/10)  Version 2: In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Ancient Israel 1, Biblical Studies, or Religion (10/10 revalidation).

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