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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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New York City Fire Department | Evaluated Learning Experience

Fire and Criminal Investigator Course (INV 200)

Formerly Fire Investigator Course (INV 200)
Location: 
New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island, New York; and 16 Hooper St., Brooklyn, New York.
Length: 

Version 1: 315 hours (9 weeks); following the classroom instruction, these additional learning experiences: approximately 96 hours of directed study over 32 weeks, and 36 weeks of Field Officer Training. Version 2 and 3: 455 hours (13 weeks) of classroom instruction, in addition, 16 weeks of Field Officer Training. Version 4 and 5: 1,525 hours (9 months),  includes approximately 500 hours of classroom instruction over 13 weeks, followed by approximately 1,000 hours of field training over 6 months, commencing with 40 hours of refresher and updates. Version 6: 2,012 hours (12 months), includes approximately 523.5 hours of classroom instruction over 15 weeks, followed by approximately 1,488.5 hours of field training over 9 months. 

Dates: 

Version 1: January 1992 - September 2000. Version 2: October 2000 - June 2001. Version 3: July 2001 - August 2007. Version 4: September 2007 - September 2012. Version 5: October 2012 - August 2015. Version 6: September 2015 -Present.

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: determine cause and origin of a fire; ascertain events leading to a fire; for fires with incendiary causes, investigate to determine responsibility; work within the legal boundaries of the Constitution and the laws governing law enforcement personnel to make arrests; provide assistance in all stages of prosecution. Version 5: Students will be able to: utilize BFI computer application to generate reports; interview and/or interrogate individuals as part of the fire investigation; operate firearms in a safe and proficient manner; identify, collect, and process fire scene evidence; issue subpoenas; take sworn oaths and affirmations; safely operate emergency vehicles; operate as police officer/subject matter expert to investigate fires in New York City. Version 6:  Students will be able to: determine the origin and cause of fire, utilizing the scientific method, in accordance with NFPA 921 and 1033; proficiently operate and safeguard issued firearms, with a clear understanding of the use of deadly physical force; have a basic understanding of self-defense techniques and proper use of equipment (handcuffs, expandable baton, OC spray) that may be needed in self-defense or to take a person into custody; have a foundational knowledge of fire science, fire chemistry and fire dynamics; the ability to write a unique fire investigation report;  demonstrate understanding of the New York State penal law, criminal procedure law, and criminal case law; interview and/or interrogate individuals while conducting an investigation; perform inter-agency collaboration as needed for the investigation; identify, collect, document and process, any potential evidence during an investigation; communicate in an effective manner to individuals who may be in crisis as a result of an event that has occurred; process an individual who has been arrested and will be brought into the criminal justice system; and provide testimony in both criminal and civil court proceedings, in addition, to serving as an expert witness, in the origin and cause of fire.

Instruction: 

Version 1, 2, 3, 4 ,5, and 6: This course is for uniform firefighters of the New York City Fire Department who are eligible for promotion according to FDNY guidelines. Some duties and responsibilities of Fire Marshals include the following: serve as police officers in the City of New York, carry firearms, analyze and interpret laboratory results, interview witnesses and/or suspsects, prepare and serve subpoenas on witnesses, testify as expert witnesses, and prepare detailed written investigative reports. Major topics include: law enforcement and the criminal justice system; ad judicatory process and court structure; police discretionary powers; firearms safety; defensive tactics; New York State Penal Law; New York State Criminal Procedure Law; civil law; dealing with emotionally disturbed persons; behavior of fire; determining point of origin; building construction; accidental fire causes; incendiary fire causes; motivation of the fire setter; fire scene investigation; vehicle fires; fatal fire investigations; evidence collection procedures; report writing; interview and interrogation; expert testimony; use of computers and on-line resources in fire investigations; role of the medical examiner in a fire investigation; and fingerprinting.

Credit recommendation: 

Version 1: 18 semester hours classified under Classroom portion and Directed study and Field Officer Training. Classroom portion: 15 semester hours distributed as follows: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Fire Science; 9 semester hours in Criminal Justice/Police Science, further distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in Introduction to Law, 3 semester hours in Law Enforcement, and 3 semester hours in Investigative Techniques; and 1 semester hour in Defensive Tactics (Physical Education). Directed study and Field Officer Training: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours as an internship in Fire Science, Fire Protection Technology, or Criminal Justice/Police Science (12/95). Version 2: 20 semester hours classified under Classroom portion and Field Officer Training. Classroom portion: 17 semester hours distributed as follows: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Fire Science; 11 semester hours in Criminal Justice/Police Science, distributed as follows: 5 semester hours in Introduction to Law, 3 semester hours in Law Enforcement, and 3 semester hours in Investigative Techniques; and 1 semester hour in Defensive Tactics (Physical Education). Field Officer Training: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours as an internship in Fire Science, Fire Protection Technology, or Criminal Justice/Police Science (6/01 revalidation). Version 3: 28 semester hours distributed as follows: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Fire/Arson Investigation, 6 semester hours in Criminal Law, 4 semester hours in Investigative Techniques, 3 semester hours of Internship in Fire Science or Criminal Justice; in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Fire Science, 3 semester hours in Law Enforcement, 1 semester hour in Defensive Tactics (P/E), 1 semester hour in Technical Writing, 1 semester hour in Accounting Topics, and 1 semester hour in Statement Analysis (12/01 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 4 and 5: 30 semester hours, distributed as follows: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 in Fire/Arson Investigation, 3 in General Law Enforcement, 3 in Firearms/Defensive Tactics, 3 in Physical Education, 2 in Constitutional and Criminal Procedure Law, 3 in Fire Science, 1 in Accounting, 3 in Penal Law, and 6 as an Internship in Fire Science or Criminal Justice (11/07 revalidation) (10/08) (5/12 revalidation). Version 6: 36 semester hours, distributed as follows: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 9 in Fire/Arson Investigation, 3 in General Law Enforcement, 3 in Firearms/Defensive Tactics, 3 in Physical Education, 2 in Constitutional and Criminal Procedure Law, 3 in Fire Science, 1 in Accounting, 3 in Penal Law, and 9 as an Internship in Fire Science or Criminal Justice (7/17 revalidation).

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