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Active Courses - EMS Academy

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in Active Courses - EMS Academy

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length:

Version 1, 2, and 3: 16 hours (2 days).

Dates:
Version 1: September 1993 - August 2007. Version 2: September 2007-September 2012. Version 3: October 2012 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the AHA ACLS Instructor course, students will be able to: teach the AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support Original and Updated courses. New instructors will be able to: teach and coach students to recognize and initiate early management of peri-arrest conditions that may result in cardiac arrest or complicate resuscitation outcomes; demonstrate proficiency in providing BLS care, including prioritizing chest compressions and AED, recognize and manage respiratory arrest, identify and manage cardiac arrest until termination of resuscitation or transfer of care, including post-cardiac arrest; recognize and initiate early management of ACS and stroke, including appropriate disposition; and effectively communicate as a member or leader of a resuscitation team and recognize the impact of team dynamics on overall team performance.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Major topics include: administration, teaching and learning in the American Heart Association ACLS course, the chain of survival, airway management, cardiac rhythms, defibrillation, cardioversion, transcutaneous pacing, intravenous cannulation, acute ischemic stroke, resuscitation methods, ethics and legal issues associated with ACLS and the withholding of care. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, classroom exercises, audio/visual material, observation, and student presentation.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Educational Methods, Health Science, Emergency Medical Services Administration, Emergency Medical Services, or Fire Science Administration (9/03 - review conducted by the American Council on Education) (10/07) (5/12 revalidation) (7/17 revalidation). NOTE: Advanced Cardiac Life Support Instructor, Certified Instructor Coordinator, Certified Lab Instructor, CPR-Instructor, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support Instructor overlap in content. The maximum credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 3 semester hours.

Location:
Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length:

Version 1: 1,115 hours (34 weeks); includes 655 hours didactic, 260 hours clinical, and 200 hours field internship. Version 2 and 3: 1,245 hours (34 weeks); includes 801 hours didactic, 244 hours clinical, and 200 hours field internship. Version 4: 1,100 hours. Version 5: 1,662 hours (40 weeks) includes 912 didactic and 750 field and clinical hours. Version 6: 1,663.75 hours (40 weeks); includes 885 didactic and 750 field and 306.25 clinical hours. 

Dates:

Version 1: May 1990 - July 1993. Version 2: August 1993 - September 2000. (Intentional gap between Versions 2 and 3.) Version 3: January 2004 - December 2006. Version 4: January 2007 - January 2012. Version 5: February 2012 - June 2016. Version 6: July 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: appropriately assess and correctly treat a single or multiple systems trauma patient in any given situation; appropriately assess and correctly treat a patient suffering from a medical emergency including conditions involving the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, nervous system, muscular system, skeletal system, integumentary system, endocrine system, digestive system, genitourinary system, and reproductive system; discuss the principles used in treating medical emergencies involving pediatrics, obstetrics, neonates, shock, behavioral disorders, toxicology, alcoholism and drug abuse, geriatrics, anaphylaxis, and infectious diseases; perform the following skills at the appropriate time in the correct situation: airway control and ventilation, endotracheal intubation; intravenous cannulation, administration of medications by intravenous, intramuscular or subcutaneous route, defibrillation, EKG interpretation, chest decompression, emergency cricothyrotomy, application of pneumatic antishock garment (PASG), fixation and traction splinting, bandaging, spinal immobilization and use of other devices appropriate to the care of the sick and injured; demonstrate disentanglement of a patient, packaging and removal from the scene, radio communications with medical control and use of report writing skills; and discuss and demonstrate the roles and responsibilities of the paramedic in performing both the emergency and operational aspects of the job.Students render pre-hospital care at an advanced level. 

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: This program is designed to provide the advanced education needed by paramedics to administer patient care in the pre-hospital setting. This program covers all techniques of advanced emergency medical care presently considered within the responsibilities of the paramedic as well as all operational aspects of the job which the student will be expected to perform. Emphasis is placed on recognition of symptoms of illness and injuries, and application of proper procedures of advanced emergency care. Demonstration, practice, clinical, and field experiences are carefully integrated with the didactic portion. The curriculum consists of six divisions: pre-hospital environment, preparatory, trauma, medical emergencies, obstetrics/gynecology, and behavioral emergencies. In addition, an expanded treatment of anatomy and physiology of the human body systems is included, as is a section on incident command. Graduates of the program are entitled to sit for the New York State Certification Examination and the New York City Medical Advisory Committee (MAC) Examination. Version 5 and 6: All of the above plus augmented instruction in cardiology for medical emergencies and trauma approach with enhanced interactive scenario based activities.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 37 semester hours in Paramedic Science (26 lecture, 6 clinical, and 5 field experience). An additional 17 semester hours is recommended as elective credit in Allied Health Science or as general elective credit (1/91) (3/96 revalidation). Of the 54 semester hours, 3 semester hours may be assigned as Anatomy and Physiology or Human Biology (no laboratory included) and 2 semester hours may be assigned as Medical Terminology.  Further, some colleges with nursing degree programs may consider waiving the first semester of nursing courses up to 7 semester hours for individuals who have successfully completed this program. NOTE: Credit should not be given for this program and the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Upgrade (MUP) program. However, the credit recommendation for this course is not considered duplicative of the Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Refresher Course. NOTE: (This note applies to individuals who exercise this option before December 31, 1995) Credit in Paramedic Science (37 semester hours) is recommended for study prior to May 1990 if the individual has re certified as a Paramedic after May 1990. Credit for Paramedic Science (37 semester hours) and elective credit (17 semester hours) is recommended for study prior to May 1990 if the individual has re certified as a Paramedic after May 1990 and has successfully completed all written exams required in the FDNY-EMS (formerly NYC EMS) Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course offered after May 1990.  NOTE: (This note applies to individuals who exercise this option after January 1, 1996) Credit in Paramedic Science (37 semester hours) is recommended for study between January 1984 and April 1990 if the individual has re certified as an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (AEMT) IV through the FDNY-EMS (formerly NYC EMS) after May 1990. Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associates degree category, 37 semester hours in Paramedic Sciences or Emergency Medical Services Technologies (12/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 37 semester hours in Paramedic Science or Emergency Medical Services Technology (26 lecture, 6 clinical, and 5 field experience). Version 5 and 6: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 43 semester hours in Paramedic Science or Emergency Medical Services Technology (34 lecture, 8 clinical/field). An additional 1 semester hour may be used for health and physical education (6/11 revalidation) (7/16 revalidation). NOTE on Version 4, 5, and 6: Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Basic Course, Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Refresher Course, Advanced Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Upgrade (MUP), and Training and Orientation Program (TOP) - Paramedic overlap in content. The maximum total credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 43 semester hours.

Location:
Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length:

Version 1: 75 Hours (10 Days). Version 2: 90 hours (12 days). Version 3: 112.5 hours (3 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: February 2008 - February 2013. Version 2: March 2013 - May 2018. Version 3: June 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: supervise emergency field command operations and manage comprehensive administrative needs of Emergency Medical Service personnel assigned to the field stations. Version 2: Same as Version 1 with: define the usual reader of Bureau of EMS documents; identify the dynamics of scheduling that require planning and frequent review and list factors that require scheduling changes; create a calendar for scheduling of periodic reports including daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, annual, and intermittent; review attendance records and make necessary corrections; discuss options available to subordinates to avoid sanction status and the role of station officers in providing clear documentation; review and assess a problematic employee's attendance status and present and defend their determinations to the class and a panel of senior EMS Command Chiefs for further discussion and feedback; explain multiple aspects of situational awareness including secondary explosive devices targeting responders, active shooter incidents, and use of apparatus for shielding/line of sight protections/command post;establish effective field communications with Lieutenants and Deputy Chiefs to maintain clarity and accuracy of information; demonstrate competence in live simulations; manage subway incidents, EMS resources at a high-rise building, and MayDay management during a fire scene; discuss critical aspects of leadership conduct and create a list of those characteristics that leaders possess; participate in scenarios that demonstrate quality leadership communications and assertive behavior which will affect ability to project command presence; identify basic resource requirements for Mass Casualty Responses; identify factors requiring extraordinary circumstances (extreme weather, spike in call volume, special events, etc); assume Medical Branch Director responsibilities on arrival and provide clear direction to any EMS member who fails to follow ICS protocols or whose performance falls short of job expectations; review abovementioned errors and utilize Goleman's Emotional Intelligence qualities(self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills); differentiate among motivated (and unmotivated) subordinate officers and develop strategies to promote harmonious working groups and teams; compare and contrast values of the four communication profiles (analytic, driver, expressive, amiable); define advocacy as a field leader and provide rewards for positive performance; define the limits of authority and delegation; discuss benefits of all Leadership styles and their relevance to FDNY EMS officers; discuss strategies for guiding Lieutenants through the evaluation process and common issues in evaluation and helpful steps in preventing unfair evaluation practices; outline expectations for the Lieutenant's approach to their subordinates before, during, and after an evaluation; propose considerations of the reviewer in providing feedback to the rater; differentiate between objective and subjective factors; describe the effects of recency, overemphasis, non-forgiveness, prejudice, favoritism, grouping, indiscrimination, and stereotyping; identify and correct problematic verbiage; discuss general guidelines to fair and appropriate evaluation practices; outline effective communication practices including active listening behaviors, eliminating barriers and providing feedback; describe essential elements of effective communication including knowing your message and recipient, maintaining objectivity and avoiding tangents; cultivate productive and harmonious relationships with superiors through effective communications; build trust with peers and subordinates through professional communications; recognize methods to empower the supervisory team and support their efforts; evaluate command discipline complaint reports while considering the circumstances, past similar episodes, seriousness of infraction, and past adjudication; explore the motivation of the issuing officer, interpersonal communications between officer and member; navigate through the delicate balance of supporting subordinate officers and maintaining strict fairness; clearly communicate behavioral expectations; and describe how to reestablish relationships with employees at the Command Discipline session. Version 3: Students will be able to: explain the task and standards of an EMS Captain; manage and prioritize the administrative responsibilities of an EMS Captain; identify critical thinking and decision-making skills; discuss the importance of effective communication as a leadership trait; recognize the value of active listening; identify the various social styles and how to interact with each style; prepare various FDNY reports in a concise and direct manner; develop strategies to run an efficient EMS Station; review and comprehend FDNY policies and procedures; practice Multiple Casualty Incident command and radio operations; apply concepts of the group project work to complex problems at an EMS Station; implement methods to ensure that station personnel remain informed and motivated; develop strategies to clearly delegate tasks to station officers; analyze various FDNY web based application; and measure performance in a consistent manner for effective evaluations.

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: administrative responsibilities during field command operations; investigation and cover reports; leadership principles and practices, including emotional intelligence; reviewing performance evaluations; Incident Command Systems: problem solving techniques, decision-making, and communications; MCI radio reports; proper channels of communication; managing organizational relationships; fleet management; conflict resolution; mentoring; facilitated discussion. Version 2: Same as Version 1, additionally; write reports and perform needs assessments; use computer skills and logistics. Version 3: The course provides several “lab days” which allow students to practice in simulated live drill exercises as well as conduct field rotations to obtain experience from field Captains. The program also includes dedicated time for “project work” so students may complete a project collaboratively which explores ways to improve the FDNY.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services Management, Emergency Medical Services Administration, Public Administration, Fire Science Administration, or Allied Health (10/08). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services Management, Emergency Medical Services Administration, Public Administration, Fire Science Administration, Allied Health, Business Administration, Leadership, or Management (6/13 revalidation). Version 3:  In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours distributed as follows: 6 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services Management, Emergency Medical Services Administration, Public Administration, Fire Science Administration, Allied Health, Business Administration, Leadership, or Management AND 2 semester hours in Communication  (6/18 revalidation). 

Formerly:
Lieutenant Orientation Program-MNG 200
Location:
Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length:

Version 1: 150 hours (over 4 weeks). Version 2: 202.5 hours (5 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: January 2008 - May 2015. Version 2: June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and apply the cornerstones of leadership; assess public perception and expectations of their new role; compare and contrast leadership strategies; discuss differences in social and leadership skills; identify expectations and strategies of professional communication; use tactical communication skills to elicit voluntary compliance in difficult situations; define emotional control, deflector phrases and apply these principles in real-life scenarios; use the strip phrase-link word-goal phrase approach; identify trigger phrases commonly encountered with the public and subordinates when under stress; practice active listening skills and attending behaviors; utilize communication techniques to create empathy, regain control, clarity and modification and reduce resistance; describe the four levels of appeal; describe and practice the eight essential steps to communicating with people in distress; compare assertive versus aggressive behaviors; apply adult learning concepts to motivate and eliminate barriers to learning; mediate when needed and evaluate subordinate staff; demonstrate mastery of the new responsibilities and fundamental requirements for success as a Lieutenant; and communicate effectively within proper channels and chains of command. Version 2: Students will be able to: successfully lead EMTs and Paramedics on the sciences of 911 emergencies in order to facilitate care for the sick or injured; analyze situations and make informed decisions based on the situation; effectively manage any mass casualty incidents, including, but not limited to: fires, car accidents, explosions, or marine accidents; effectively communicate with co-workers, subordinates, and the general public; analyze safety considerations when operating in dangerous incidents; perform administrative functions pertaining to ambulance in-servicing and availability, uniform inspections, and various reports for superior officers; and determine the need for gathering reports when situations arise with crews, patients, and the public.

Instruction:

Version 1: This course combines lectures with scenario-based practice incorporating the basic concepts of The One Minute Manager, by Ken Blanchard, preparing candidates for leadership as well as procedural requirements as a lieutenant. Version 2: This course has been expanded in the following areas: MCI Management curriculum, simulated exercises, small group discussion and workshops on leadership principles. Hours for field rotation and internships have increased. Methods of instruction include: study guides, supplemental readings, quizzes, homework, and updated textbooks.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Fire Service Administration, Management and Supervision or Communications OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Management/Supervision or Fire Service Administration and 3 semester hours in Communications (7/10). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 7 semester hours in Fire Service Administration, Management and Supervision or Communications OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Management/Supervision or Fire Service Administration and 3 semester hours in Communications (6/15 revalidation).

Location:
New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island, New York (through December 1997); Fort Totten, Bayside, New York (beginning January 1998).
Length:
Version 1: 100 hours (2.5weeks). Version 2: 72 hours (10 weeks). Version 3: 64 hours (9 weeks). Version 4: 68 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:

Version 1: August 1994 - December 1998. Version 2: January 1999 - May 2005. Version 3: June 2005 - June 2012. Version 4: July 2012- Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe basic human anatomy and physiology; explain the rationale and describe fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient suffering from trauma or a medical emergency; perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clear an obstructed airway; defibrillate a patient in ventricular fibrillation; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock and external hemorrhage; perform immobilization techniques; prepare a mother for cephalic delivery; provide care to a newborn; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging and preparation for removal from the scene of an emergency; file a standardized NYS Patient Care Report; describe the roles and responsibilities of the first responder in performing both emergency and operational aspects of the job; and demonstrate proper use and care of emergency equipment.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: This course is designed to provide the basic education needed by first responders to provide patient care in the pre-hospital setting. Instruction covers all techniques of emergency medical care currently considered within the responsibilities of the first responder as well as the operational aspects of the job that students are expected to perform. Demonstration and skill practice are integrated into the didactic instruction. The curriculum consists of two divisions: basic life support and trauma/medical orientation; and three skills areas: patient assessment, airway and oxygen, bleeding control and fracture management. In addition, the following areas are covered: CPR re certification, overview of the pediatric patient, care of newborn, neonate resuscitation, rapid takedown, rapid extrication, helmet removal, and defibrillation. Graduates of this course are eligible to sit for the New York State certification examination for First Responder with the capability of performing defibrillation.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Medical Care (5/95) (5/00 revalidation) (10/07 revalidation). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Medical Care or Emergency Management; OR in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Medical Care or Emergency Management and in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, and 1 semester hour in health or physical education (6/11 revalidation) (7/16 revalidation).

Location:
Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length:
Version 1: 32 hours (4 days). Version 2: 33 hours (4 days). Version 3: 37 hours (5 days).
Dates:
Version 1: February 1997 - May 2005. Version 2: June 2005 - May 2007. Version 3: June 2007 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe basic human anatomy and physiology; explain the rationale and describe fundamentals of pre-hospital care and treatment of the sick and injured; perform a primary and secondary patient survey by evaluating and treating a patient suffering from trauma or a medical emergency; perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation and clear an obstructed airway; defibrillate a patient in ventricular fibrillation; recognize the signs, symptoms and treatment of shock and external hemorrhage; perform immobilization techniques; prepare a mother for cephalic delivery; provide care to a newborn; demonstrate basic disentanglement of a patient, packaging and preparation for removal from the scene of an emergency; file a standardized NYS Patient Care Report; describe the roles and responsibilities of the first responder in performing both emergency and operational aspects of the job; and demonstrate proper use and care of emergency equipment.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, and 3: This course reviews the content of the Certified First Responder - Defibrillation (CFR-D) course, updates any changes in medical techniques and practices, and covers current trends and issues. The course covers all techniques of emergency medical care currently considered within the responsibilities of the first responder as well as the operational aspects of the job that students are expected to perform. Demonstration and skill practice are integrated into the didactic instruction. The curriculum consists of two divisions: basic life support and trauma/medical orientation; and three skills areas: patient assessment, airway and oxygen, bleeding control and fracture management. In addition, the following areas are covered: CPR re certification, overview of the pediatric patient, care of newborn, neonate resuscitation, rapid takedown, rapid extrication, helmet removal, and defibrillation. Graduates of this course are eligible to re certify by sitting for the New York State certification examination for First Responder with the capability of performing defibrillation.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Health Science, Allied Health Sciences, Emergency Medical Care (5/00) (5/07 revalidation) (6/11 revalidation) (7/16 revalidation). NOTE: Care should be taken to avoid awarding duplicate credit for refresher courses.

Location:
Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length:

Version 1, 2, and 3: 24 hours (1.5 weeks).

Dates:
Version 1: September 2002 - August 2007. Version 2: September 2007- September 2012. Version 3: October 2012 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the differences between training, education and instruction; identify which of the three learning domains each objective primarily belongs to; develop a lesson plan, including the presentation method to be used, identify the presentation medium, select an appropriate room layout and develop a valid evaluation tool based on the objectives; evaluate students’ performances as related to instructional objectives and provide appropriate feedback to students to elicit behavior changes needed for successful completion of the objectives; demonstrate knowledge of New York State Department of Health BEMS policies and recognize the importance of having policies and procedures for course sponsors and students; account for and maintain accurate records of student progress, counseling and remediation plan implementation and outcomes; and manage Certified Lab Instructors (CLIs).

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: EMT-B and CFR based modules, handling difficult students, delivering effective presentations, conducting skills examinations, incorporating knowledge of Americans with disabilities and the adult learner, and completion of 50-hour internship. Version 2 and 3: Same instruction for Version 1, with the addition of: identifying effective presentation modalities and appropriate room layout, providing appropriate feedback to students based on instructional objectives, demonstrating knowledge of NYS DOH BEMS policies, maintaining accurate records tracking student progress, counseling, and implementation of remediation plans and outcomes.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Educational Methods, Health Science, Emergency Medical Services Administration, or Fire Science Administration (10/07) (5/12 revalidation) (717 revalidation). NOTE: Advanced Cardiac Life Support Instructor, Certified Instructor Coordinator, Certified Lab Instructor, CPR-Instructor, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support Instructor overlap in content. The maximum credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 3 semester hours. Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Educational Methods, Health Science, Emergency Medical Services Administration or Fire Science Administration (5/12 revalidation) (7/17 revalidation). NOTE: Upon successful completion of NYS Certification, one additional semester hour is recommended for the 50-hour internship.

Location:
Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length:

Version 1, 2, and 3: 24 hours (2.5 weeks). Version 4 and 5: 29 hours (over 2 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: September 2002 - September 2007. Version 2: October 2007- October 2012. Version 3: November 2012 - May 2015. Version 4 and 5: June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: serve under a certified instructor coordinator as a certified laboratory instructor in either an Emergency Medical Technician or Advanced Emergency Medical Technician course. Version 4 and 5: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: arrange the modular set up for an EMT basic course; explain the role of a certified lab instructor in EMS instruction; identify different ways in which students learn and be able to apply multiple teaching techniques when instructing EMS lab skills; explain the importance of communication in learning in order to communicate effectively with students and facilitate productive feedback sessions following EMS lab skill practice; design and run effective EMS lab skill scenarios; apply basic moulage techniques in EMS lab skill scenarios; analyze and critique student performance in EMS lab skills in the classroom and on New York State Practical Skills Exam; and differentiate among nuances in these evaluations and effectively participate in EMS instruction as a Certified Lab Instructor.

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Major topics include: teaching adult learners, teaching BLS lab skills, overview of psychomotor objectives in the EMT-B curriculum, lab skills demo-trauma, medical, pediatric, medical and pediatric cardiac arrest, medical administration devices, upper airway adjuncts and suction, mouth to mask with /supplement oxygen and supplemental oxygen administration, and completion of 36-hour internship. Version 4 and 5: In addition to instruction listed in previous versions, this version replaces lecture hours with hands on activities, scenarios, and role plays.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Educational Methods, Health Science, Emergency Medical Services Administration, or Fire Science Administration (10/07) (5/12 revalidation). NOTE: Advanced Cardiac Life Support Instructor, Certified Instructor Coordinator, Certified Lab Instructor, CPR-Instructor, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support Instructor overlap in content. The maximum credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 3 semester hours. Version 4 and 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Educational Methods, Health Science, Emergency Medical Services Administration, or Fire Science Administration (6/15 revalidation). NOTE: Upon successful completion of NYS Certification, one additional semester hour is recommended for the 36-hour internship.

Location:
New York City Fire Academy, Randalls Island, New York (through December 1997); Fort Totten, Bayside, New York (beginning January 1998).
Length:
Version 1: 32 hours (4 days). Version 2: 32 hours (4 days); in addition, participants complete a formally supervised and evaluated 8 hour classroom teaching demonstration. Version 3: 16 hours (2 days).
Dates:
Version 1: March 1990 - December 1999. Version 2: January 2000 - May 2005. Version 3: June 2005 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: teach the CPR-Basic Life Support Providers Course; offer instruction in Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation and home safety tips for infants and children; develop a comprehensive understanding in basic Cardio-Pulmonary anatomy and physiology and methods to prevent mortality from respiratory complications or other causes of sudden death; effectively conduct all BLS (basic life skills) courses offered by the American Heart Association (AHA) and present all required course information via video format; analyze and evaluate students' skills performances and provide remediation where appropriate; process all required AHA paperwork culminating in the issuance of certification cards. 

Instruction:

Version 1: Major topics include: review of CPR-BLS Providers Course, role of the CPR instructor, nature of the teaching/learning interaction, motivation, teaching psychomotor skills, lesson planning, audio-visual aids, manikin maintenance and decontamination, fielding questions, practical skills evaluation. Students practice didactic and psychomotor skills topic presentations. Version 2 and 3: All topics included in Version 1; additionally; public access defibrillation programs.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Educational Methods (5/95). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Educational Methods (5/00 revalidation). NOTE: Participants must have successfully completed the 8-hour post-course classroom teaching demonstration to qualify for this credit recommendation. Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Educational Methods, Health Science, Emergency Medical Services Administration, or Fire Science Administration, or Physical Education (10/07 revalidation) (6/11 revalidation) (7/16 revalidation). NOTE: Advanced Cardiac Life Support Instructor, CPR-Instructor, and Pediatric Advanced Life Support Instructor overlap in content. The maximum credit recommendation for any combination of these courses is 3 semester hours.

Location:
Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length:

Version 1: 187 hours (3 weeks). Version 2: 262 hours (4 weeks). Version 3: 225 hours (6 weeks). Version 4: 300 hours (8 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: January 2002 - January 2007. Version 2: February 2007 - February 2012. Version 3: March 2012 - June 2016. Version 4: July 2016 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the concept of emergency medical dispatch (EMD); apply the technology used to operate an EMD program; display quality assurance; and perform emergency medical dispatching. Version 2 and 3: Additionally, students will be able to: rapidly and efficiently answer and triage 911 assignments; offer each assignment for ambulance dispatch; apply effective communication techniques; discuss the role of the Emergency Communications Center within the 911 system; and discuss the role of the communications professional within the 911 system.Version 4: Students will be able to: will be able to accurately and expeditiously enter a request for emergency assistance; properly utilize the various commands and techniques specific to 911 call processing, such as location verification procedures, telephone triage, and pre arrival instructions for the caller/patient; correctly use the medical Algorithm designed by the FDNY Office of Medical Affairs, which assists with a detailed, but a brief line of questioning to arrive at the correct call type to ensure the appropriate ambulance response (ALS,BLS or BOTH).

Instruction:

Version 1, 2, and 3: Major topics include: emergency medical dispatch models; technological components to EMD; customer service relations; EMD policy; and procedure issues. Methods of instruction include lecture, classroom exercises, A/V materials and computer-assisted instruction. Evaluation methods include quizzes, final reports and instructor evaluations.Version 4: The Assignment Receiving Dispatcher is not just entering calls for emergencies,  they are taught about the importance of para-language. The callers tone, voice inflection, and how the caller answers the questions are all clues as to what is going on at that location.  ARD students will be able to evaluate the entire call; recognize not only what is being said, but what is not being said; differentiate the background noises to determine if there is something on the scene that might be a safety hazard to the crew, the caller and the public; and paraphrase all of this information for the dispatcher and the responding EMS crew.  

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services, or Fire Science and Emergency Management (12/03 - reviewed by the American Council on Education). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services or Fire Science and Emergency Management (10/07). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services, Fire Science and Emergency Management, or Communications (6/11 revalidation). Version 4: In the lower division bacalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services, Fire Science, and Emergency Management or Communications (7/16 revalidation). 

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