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New York City Fire Department | Evaluated Learning Experience

Emergency Medical Dispatch - Assignment Receiving Dispatcher (EMD-ARD) (COM 200)

Location: 
Fort Totten, Bayside, New York.
Length: 

Version 1: 187 hours (3 weeks). Version 2: 262 hours (4 weeks). Version 3: 225 hours (6 weeks). Version 4: 300 hours (8 weeks). 

Dates: 

Version 1: January 2002 - January 2007. Version 2: February 2007 - February 2012. Version 3: March 2012 - June 2016. Version 4: July 2016 - Present.

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the concept of emergency medical dispatch (EMD); apply the technology used to operate an EMD program; display quality assurance; and perform emergency medical dispatching. Version 2 and 3: Additionally, students will be able to: rapidly and efficiently answer and triage 911 assignments; offer each assignment for ambulance dispatch; apply effective communication techniques; discuss the role of the Emergency Communications Center within the 911 system; and discuss the role of the communications professional within the 911 system.Version 4: Students will be able to: will be able to accurately and expeditiously enter a request for emergency assistance; properly utilize the various commands and techniques specific to 911 call processing, such as location verification procedures, telephone triage, and pre arrival instructions for the caller/patient; correctly use the medical Algorithm designed by the FDNY Office of Medical Affairs, which assists with a detailed, but a brief line of questioning to arrive at the correct call type to ensure the appropriate ambulance response (ALS,BLS or BOTH).

Instruction: 

Version 1, 2, and 3: Major topics include: emergency medical dispatch models; technological components to EMD; customer service relations; EMD policy; and procedure issues. Methods of instruction include lecture, classroom exercises, A/V materials and computer-assisted instruction. Evaluation methods include quizzes, final reports and instructor evaluations.Version 4: The Assignment Receiving Dispatcher is not just entering calls for emergencies,  they are taught about the importance of para-language. The callers tone, voice inflection, and how the caller answers the questions are all clues as to what is going on at that location.  ARD students will be able to evaluate the entire call; recognize not only what is being said, but what is not being said; differentiate the background noises to determine if there is something on the scene that might be a safety hazard to the crew, the caller and the public; and paraphrase all of this information for the dispatcher and the responding EMS crew.  

Credit recommendation: 

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services, or Fire Science and Emergency Management (12/03 - reviewed by the American Council on Education). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services or Fire Science and Emergency Management (10/07). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 5 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services, Fire Science and Emergency Management, or Communications (6/11 revalidation). Version 4: In the lower division bacalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Emergency Medical Services, Fire Science, and Emergency Management or Communications (7/16 revalidation). 

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