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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Joint Apprentice Training Committee of the Elevator Industry | Evaluated Learning Experience

1. Basic Electricity-First Year 2. Elevator Systems-First Year (Formerly Introduction to Elevator Systems-First Year) 3. Introduction to AC/DC Machinery-Second Year 4. Elevator Control Systems-Second Year

Location: 
Park West High School, 525 West 50th Street, New York, NY.
Length: 

Course 1 and 2:  144 hours (36 weeks);  Course 3: 72 hours (18 weeks);  Course 4: 72 hours (18 weeks).

Dates: 

Version 1: Course 1 and 2: September 1986 - August 1993. Course 3: September 1986 - August 1993. Course 4: September 1986 - August 1993. Version 2: Course 1 and 2: September 1993 - August 2000.* Course 3: September 1993 - August 2000.* Course 4: September 1993 - August 2000.*

Instructional delivery format: 
Traditional classroom model
Learner Outcomes: 

Version 1 and 2, Course 1 and 2:  Students will be able to: apply basic math skills to problems and needs of maintenance, repair, and conversion work in the elevator industry; explain basic electrical concepts and apply these concepts to work situations; read electrical circuits and apply this ability to elevator circuitry; use mechanical and electrical measuring devices; describe the functions of the component parts of hydraulic, geared and gearless elevator systems; demonstrate safe work practices. Version 1 and 2, Course 3 and 4: Students will be able to: apply basic math skills to the needs of the elevator industry; explain electrical concepts and their application to the elevator industry; read circuit prints involved in the automatic control devices of elevator systems; troubleshoot problems and conduct safety tests of automatic control devices and their circuits.

Instruction: 

Version 1 and 2, Course 1 and 2: Topics include: structure of matter; the atom; conductance; electric current; producing and using electricity; magnetism; measuring electrical quantities; resistance; Ohm's Law; series circuits, parallel circuits, and series parallel circuits; circuit failure; measuring devices (steel rule, calipers, micrometers, electrical meters); small tools, their uses and misuses; elevator systems (the machine room, traction machines, hydraulic machines, generators, motors and brakes, the controller, selector, governor, ropes, sheaves and guide rails, stopping and leveling devices, cab equipment, pit equipment); circuit tracing (safety circuits, motors and brakes, directional control, protective devices, stopping circuits, hall buttons, interlocks); safety attitudes and practices. Version 1 and 2, Course 3 and 4: AC/DC machinery (inductance, capacitance, DC generators, field winding, AC generators, inductor motors, AC controls, voltage drop and controls, rectifiers, DC brakes, DC motors, commutators and brushes); automatic controls I (print reading, symbols, reverse phase relays, governors, interlocks, gate contact, rectifiers, safety devices, contacts and coils, clapper relays, AC/DC relays, establishing direction, brakes, AC motors, capacitors in timing circuits, holding and stepping circuits, safety circuits, door control circuits, directional controls, limits, hall relay circuits, leveling, and troubleshooting); automatic controls II (print reading, motor-generator configuration, wye-start and delta-run connections, voltage to DC motor, exciting the generator, reducing applied voltage, emergency stop, the AMAC@ operator, troubleshooting the operator, light circuits, troubleshooting erratic car travel and car failure; troubleshooting problems); code and elevator safety tests; troubleshooting in maintenance work.

Credit recommendation: 

Version 1, Course 1, 2, 3, and 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 10 semester hours in Electromechanical Engineering Technology distributed as follows: 4 semester hours in AC/DC Circuits and 6 semester hours (5 lecture, 1 laboratory) in Advanced Mechanisms. NOTE: A student must successfully complete all four years of the curriculum to benefit from the laboratory credit recommendation in Advanced Mechanisms, or 11 semester hours in Applied Technology distributed as follows: 2 semester hours in Principles of Electrical Technology, 3 semester hours in Electrical Machinery, 3 semester hours in Industrial Controls, 3 semester hours in Concepts of Electrical Safety, and, in addition, 2 semester hours in Mechanical Design for Electronics in Mechanical or Electrical Engineering Technology, or 10 semester hours in Electrical Construction and Maintenance distributed as follows: 2 semester hours in Electrical Theory I, 2 semester hours in Electrical Theory II, 2 semester hours in Electrical Theory III, 2 semester hours in Electrical Theory IV, and 2 semester hours in Electrical Blueprint Reading (6/88). NOTE: With each distribution outlined above, Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4 must be completed to receive credit. NOTE: 4,000 hours (2,000 each year) of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for these courses. Version 2, Course 1, 2, 3, and 4: In the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours as Industrial Electricity (7/93 revalidation) (8/94 revalidation) (9/99 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4 must be completed to receive credit. NOTE: 4,000 hours (2,000 each year) of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for these courses. *NOTE: The current version of this sequence, dating from September 2000, appears in the retired  section.

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