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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Central Operations - Substations and Steam

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in Central Operations - Substations and Steam

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Power Generation Services Training Center, 910 East 134th St., Bronx, NY (through December 1992); The Learning Center, 43-82 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY (beginning January 1993).
Length:

Course 1 and 2:  80 hours (combined).

Dates:

Course 1 and 2,  Version 1: February 1987 - May 2013. Course 1 and 2, Version 2: June 2013 - July 2018. Course  1 and 2, Version 3: August 2018 - Present.

Objectives:

Course 1 and 2, Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: set up and test oxygen and acetylene cylinders and accessory equipment; perform basic cutting; cut freehand, guide and bevel; identify all safety regulations for cutting and welding; identify common causes and types of boiler tube failure; and perform tube repairs and tube rolling procedures. Course 1 and 2: Version 2 and Course 1 and 2: Version 3: Same as Version 1; in addition: demonstrate proper transporation and securement methods for oxygen and acetylene cylinders; demonstrate inspection requirements for oxygen and acetylene; state the normal pressure for oxygen and acetylene cylinders; describe the construction of oxygen and acetylene cylinders; identify the parts of oxygen and acetylene regulators; describe the function and operation of fusible plugs in acetylene cylinders and safety discs in oxygen cylinders; select the appropriate cutting tip for the application; demonstrate how to adjust oxygen and acetylene flows to obtain a neutral flame and the desired flame characteristics; describe the process for piercing a hole in a piece of plate and splitting a nut off a bolt without damaging the threads of the bolt; describe the PPE which must be used when cutting or welding; successfully pass the NYFD Certificate of Fitness Examinations for Fire Guard Torch Operations (F30) Torch Use of Flammable Gases (G-38); describe the features and causes of: metal tearing at support clip attachments, thermal cracks, pinhole leaks, and steam gouging; list the four common types of tube deformity; identify safety practices and requirements for: entering a boiler, scaffolding, oxy-acetylene burning and welding equipment, and Skyclimber; identify and mark the section of tube to be removed; prepare and install a slag trap and remove the failed area; mark and identify the section removed for failure analysis; cut and prepare replacement sections, including window sections; state which repair methods are allowable under Consolidated Edison guidelines; identify the proper method for removing a rolled tube from a drum; accurately calculate the required tube expansion for a replacement tube; and expand and flare a tube to the required dimensions. 

Instruction:

Course 1 and 2, Version 1, 2, and 3: Topics include: safe operation of oxy-acetylene equipment and accessories; flame cutting techniques; preparation of joints for welding; types of boilers; causes and types of tube failure; repair methods; and boiler tube expanding procedures.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2, Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Industrial Technology, Welding Technology, or Marine Technology (5/89) (10/92 revalidation) (10/97 revalidation) (8/02 revalidation) (9/07 revalidation) (8/13 revalidation). Course 1 and 2: Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours (2 semester hours in Industrial Technology, Welding Technology, or Marine Technology, and 1 semester hour laboratory) (8/18 revalidation). NOTE: Course 1 and 2 must both be completed to receive full credit. For students who complete only Basic Burning (FMG-0112), the total credit recommendation is reduced to 2 semester hours.  

Location:
The Learning Center, 43-82 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY (beginning January 1993); and other company locations In the New York Metropolitan area.
Length:

Course 1, Version 1:  56 hours (7 days). Course 1 and 2, Version 2 and 3:  40 hours (5 days). Course 1, Version 3 and Course 2, Version 1: 80 hours (combined).

Dates:

Course 1, Version 1:  January 2001 - November 2003.*  Course 1, Version 2: December 2003 - June 2013. Course 2, Version 1: January 2001 - June 2013. Course 1, Version 3: July 2013 - July 2018.

Course 2: Version 2 and 3: July 2013 - July 2018. Course 1, Version 4, Course 2, Version 4: August 2018 - Present. 

Objectives:

Course 1, Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain basic principles of electricity and  perform electrical circuit calculations using series, parallel, and series-parallel DC circuits. Course 2, Version 1: Students will be able to: perform basic calculations of capacitive and inductive reactance, and impedance and apply Ohm's law to AC circuits. Course 1, Version 3: Same as Version 1 and 2, in addition; students will be able to: describe basic concepts of atoms, electrical charge, electrons, current, voltage, and resistance; describe the relationship of voltage, current, and resistance in a series-parallel circuit; describe the relationship of work to electrical power; describe the construction and basic characteristics of lead-acid storage batteries; describe the factors that determine the resistance of a conductor; describe the use and application of wire size tables; describe the principles of voltage drop across conductors; and describe the properties of magnets and the characteristics of electronagnetism and electromotive force and the principles of DC motors. Course 2, Version 2: Same as Version 1, in addition; students will be able to: demonstrate a basic understanding of the characteristics of alternating-current circuits and the devices contained in the circuits; describe the methods for generation of alternating-current and related terminology; describe self-induction and mutual induction; describe inductive reactance and the relationship between voltage and current in inductive circuits; use vectors to show the voltage and current relationship in an AC series circuit; describe the current-voltage relationship in an AC parallel circuit containing resistance and capacitance; and describe the concepts associated with power, power factor, and power correction factor in AC circuits. Course 1, Version 3, Course 2, Version 1: Same as Course 1, Version 2 and Course 2. Course 1, Version 4, Course 2, Version 4: Same as Course 1, Version 2, Course 2, Version 1. 

Instruction:

Course 1, Version 1, 2 and 3: Major topics include: Ohm's law; series, parallel, series/parallel circuits; power and energy; batteries; magnetism, electromagnetism, generation of EMF, and DC motor principles; types and applications of electrical instruments; safety. Course 2, Version 1: Topics include: AC principles; inductance, capacitance, and reactance AC power. Course 1, Version 1-4, Course 2, Version 1-4: Same as Course 1, Version 1-3, Course 2, Version 1. 

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and Course 2, Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as DC Circuits (no laboratory) in an Electromechanical or Mechanical Technology curriculum. Course 1 and Course 2, Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree, 4 semester hours as DC/AC Electrical Systems or Electromechanical, Mechanical, or General Technology (8/18 revalidation). NOTE: Course 1 and 2 must both be completed to receive credit (8/01 revalidation) (8/06 revalidation) (8/13 revalidation) (8/18 revalidation). *NOTE: Earlier versions of these courses, dating from February 1995 to December 2000, have been recommended for credit. For further information, please refer to exhibit that begins with the title DC Fundamentals in the Inactive Learning Experiences section.

Location:
The Learning Center, 43-82 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY (beginning January 1993) and other company locations in the New York Metropolitan area.
Length:

Course 1: 80 hours (10 days). Course 2: 40 hours (5 days).

Dates:

Course 1 and 2: January 2001 - Present.*

Objectives:

Course 1 and 2:  Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain basic principles of electricity; perform electrical circuit calculations; following schematics, wire, operate, and test electrical circuits, including motors and controls; explain control pilot devices used in motor control circuits; basic sequence of operations for pushbutton motor control circuits; various types of AC and DC motors; and perform basic troubleshooting on a malfunctioning motor.

Instruction:

Course 1: Major topics include: review of AC principles; inductance, capacitance, and reactance AC power. AC and DC generators and connections; transformers (principles and connections); reactance; impedance; single and three-phase induction. DC and AC motors; troubleshooting; motor maintenance. Course 2: Major topics include: principles of controls for AC and DC motors; protective devices; troubleshooting basics; motor types; starters, controls and overloads; dynamic and electronic breaking.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as Motors and Motor Controls (no laboratory) in an Electromechanical or Mechanical Technology curriculum (8/01 revalidation) (8/06 revalidation) (8/13 administrative review) (10/14 revalidation) (8/18 revalidation). Course 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours as Motors and Motor Controls (no laboratory) in an Electromechanical or Mechanical Technology curriculum (8/01 revalidation) (8/06 revalidation) (8/13 revalidation) (8/18 revalidation). NOTE: Course 1 and 2 must both be completed to receive credit.  *NOTE: Earlier versions of these courses, dating from February 1995 to December 2000, have been recommended for credit. Please refer to exhibit that begins with the title DC Fundamentals for further information.

Location:
Hellgate Training Center, 910 East 134th Street, Bronx, NY (through December 1992); The Learning Center, 43-82 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY (beginning January 1993).
Length:

Course 1: 16 hours (2 days). Course 2, Version 1 and 2: 16 hours; includes 8 hours of supervised laboratory experience. Course 2, Version 3: 16 hours; includes 3 hours of supervised laboratory experience. Course 2, Version 4 and 5: 24 hours (3 days).

Dates:

Course 1, June 1988 - Present.

Course 2, Version 1: May 1987 - December 1995. Course 2, Version 2: January 1996 - January 2001. Course 2, Version 3: February 2001 - November 2004. Course 2, Version 4: December 2004 - November 2003. Course 2, Version 5: December 2003 - Present.

Objectives:

Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the fundamental principles of measuring length, weight, volume, pressure, temperature and time; explain the English and metric measurement systems and define the units of length, weight, volume, pressure, temperature and time; identify and describe the proper use of the machinist's rule, folding rule, tape rule, depth rule, torque wrench, combination squares, various calipers, and dividers; identify and read temperature gauges, pressure gauges and switches, oil level gauges, vacuum gauges, compound gauges; explain use, care and calibration of vernier calipers, inside and outside micrometers, telescoping gauges, dial indicators and fixed gauges; identify and describe the use of voltage testers, continuity testers, multimeters, megohmmeters, low resistance ohmmeters, ammeters, galvanometers, high voltage test sticks; describe the general safety procedures for using electrical measuring instruments and test sets; and identify and describe the uses of oil test sets and dew scopes. Course 2, Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify and describe the uses of punches, files, hacksaws, reamers, taps, dies; pipe, strap and chain wrenches; vises, pneumatic drills; portable electric drills, grinders; and list safety practices associated with pneumatic and electric drills and grinders. Course 2, Version 2:  Students will be able to: identify and describe the uses of punches, files, hacksaws, reamers, taps, dies; pipe, strap and chain wrenches; vises, pneumatic drills; portable electric drills, grinders. Course 2, Version 3 and 4: Students will be able to: identify and describe the uses of punches, files, hacksaws, reamers, taps, dies; pipe, strap and chain wrenches; vises; portable electric drills; bench and portable grinders. Course 2, Version 5: All objectives of earlier versions; in addition, students will be able to: use appropriate measuring instruments to measure length, inside diameter, outside diameter, and angle.

Instruction:

Course 1: Major topics include: English and metric systems; thermometers; rules; calipers; torque wrenches; gauges; micrometers; telescoping gauges; dial indicators; fixed gauges; voltage testers; continuity testers; multimeters; megohmmeters; low resistance ohmmeters; ammeters; galvanometers; high voltage test sets; oil test sets; dew scopes. Course 2, Version 1, 2, 3 and 4: Major topics include: tool safety; punches; files; hacksaw blades and use; reamers; thread cutting tools; wrenches; vises; portable electric drills; grinders; grinding wheels. Course 2, Version 5: Same content as all earlier versions; in addition, use and reading of machinist's rule, inside calipers, outside calipers, and protractors.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2, Version 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Electrical Construction and Plant Maintenance, Electronic Service Technology, or Plant Utilities Maintenance (4/91) (5/96 revalidation) (8/01 revalidation) (8/06 revalidation) (10/14 revalidation) (9/19 revalidation). NOTE: Course 1 and 2 must both be completed to receive credit.

Location:

Power Generation Services Training Center, 910 East 134th St., Bronx, NY (through December 1992);

,

The Learning Center, 43-82 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY (beginning January 1993); and other company locations in the New York Metropolitan area.

Length:

Course 1: 40 hours (5 days). Course 2, Version 1: 16 hours (2 days). Course 2, Version 2: 24 hours (3 days).

Dates:

Course 1: March 2001 - Present. Course 2, Version 1: March 2001 - November 2003. Course 2, Version 2: December 2003 - Present.

Objectives:

Course 1 and Course 2: Version 1 or 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: explain the theory and function of protective devices in power plant operation and test electrical equipment using high potential DC instruments.

Instruction:

Course 1: Major topics include: safe work practices and procedures; introduction to system protection; zones of protection; types of faults and their causes; types of relays; instrument  transformers; relay device numbers and symbols; relay drawings and nameplates; relay construction and operating principles; and relay trip circuitry. Course 2, Version 1 and 2: Major topics include: dielectrics; insulation testing; dielectric proof testing; specification review; testing procedures and safety rules; work permits and test permits.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and Course 2, Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Industrial Electronics and Controls or Power Technology (8/01) (8/06 revalidation) (10/14 revalidation) (9/19 revalidation). NOTE: Course 1 and 2 must both be completed to receive credit. NOTE: This course sequence overlaps with the next sequence and the stand-alone course, Protective Relays for Technicians (TLC-6000). Care should be taken to avoid awarding duplicate credit.

Location:
Power Generation Services Training Center, 910 East 134th St., Bronx, NY (through December 1992); The Learning Center, 43-82 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY (beginning January 1993) and other company locations in the New York Metropolitan area.
Length:

Course 1, Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: 40 hours (5 days). Course 2, Version 1: 32 hours (4 days). Course 2, Version 2: 24 hours (3 days).

Dates:

Course 1, Version 1: June 1987 - September 1994. Course 1, Version 2: October 1994 - December 2000. Course 1, Version 3: January 2001 - November 2003. Course 1, Version 4: December 2003 - Present. Course 2, Version 1: June 1987 - November 2003. Course 2, Version 2:  December 2003 - Present.

Objectives:

Course 1 and 2, Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to explain the theory and function of protective devices in power plant operation; test electrical equipment using high potential DC instruments. 

Instruction:

Course 1, Version 1: Major topics include: protective schemes; protective devices; zones of protection; overcurrent relays; undervoltage relays; voltage controlled overcurrent relays; directional overcurrent relays; percentage differential relays; instrument transformers; transducers; industry procedures. Course 1, Version 2: Topics include: safe work practices and procedures; introduction to system protection; zones of protection; types of faults and their causes; types of relays; instrument transformers; relay device numbers and symbols; relay drawings and nameplates; relay construction and operating principles; auxiliary and special purpose relays; relay trip circuitry; equipment misoperations and errors. Course 1, Version 3 and 4: Topics include: safe work practices and procedures; introduction to system protection; zones of protection; types of faults and their causes; types of relays; instrument transformers; relay device numbers and symbols; relay drawings and nameplates; relay construction and operating principles; relay trip circuitry. Course 2, Version 1 and 2: Topics include: electrics; insulation testing; dielectric proof testing; specification review; testing procedures and safety rules; work permits and test permits.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, Version 1, 2, and 3 and Course 2, Version 1:  In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Industrial Electronics and Controls or in Power Technology (5/88) (5/93 revalidation) (5/96 revalidation) (8/01 revalidation) (8/06 revalidation). Course 1, Version 4 and Course 2, Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Industrial Electronics and Controls or in Power Technology (8/06 revalidation) (10/14 revalidation) (9/19 revalidation). NOTE: Course 1 and 2 must both be completed to receive credit. NOTE: This course sequence overlaps with the previous sequence and the stand-alone course, Protective Relays for Technicians (TLC-6000) in a separate exhibit. Care should be taken to avoid awarding duplicate credit.

Formerly:
Advanced Electrical Print Reading and Trouble Shooting for I and C Technicians (PG-130)
Location:
The Learning Center, 43-82 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY and other company locations in the New York Metropolitan area.
Length:
40 hours (1 week).
Dates:
May 1993 - Present.*
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to read and interpret wiring diagrams and prints; wire up devices from diagrams; and detect problems in the apparatus and correct them by referring to diagrams.

Instruction:

Major topics include: single line diagrams; wiring and physical diagrams; schematic diagrams; block diagrams; functional control diagrams; process control diagrams; key interlock diagrams; high tension diagrams; procedure plates; physical location diagrams; logic diagrams; piping details; vendor schematics and diagrams; and troubleshooting techniques.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Analog and Digital Servicing and Troubleshooting (5/93 revalidation) (10/97 revalidation) (8/02 revalidation) (9/07 revalidation) (3/16 revalidation). *NOTE: From April 1988 to April 1993 this course was recommended for credit as part of a course grouping. Please refer to the course exhibit that begins with the title Advanced Electrical Print Reading and Trouble Shooting for I and C Technicians (PG-130) for the earlier credit recommendation.

Location:

Power Generation Services Training Center, 910 East 134th St., Bronx, NY (through December 1992); The Learning Center, 43-82 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY (beginning January 1993); and other company locations in the New York Metropolitan area.

Length:

80 hours (2 weeks).

Dates:

September 1987 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to calculate boiler efficiency and losses, turbine heat rate and losses, and power plant efficiencies.

Instruction:

Major topics include: turbine heat-rate calculation; heat loss calculation for load change, circulating water temperature, back pressure, superheat and reheat attemperation, turbine foiling and deterioration, throttle pressure and temperature, reheat temperature, feedwater heater, and auxiliary power; boiler efficiency calculations; causes and measurements of losses: steam flow, fuel usage, outside air temperature, combustion, air leakage, exit gas temperature, and atomizing steam; American Society of Mechanical Engineersr (ASME) test code procedures for turbine efficiency, feedwater heater, and boiler heat balances; analysis and evaluation of test results to determine causes for losses and the effects on heat rate.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Electromechanical, Energy Management, Combustion, or Mechanical Engineering Technology (5/88) (5/93 revalidation) (12/98 revalidation) (1/04 revalidation) (10/14 revalidation) (9/19 revalidation). NOTE: If credit has already been awarded for Power Plant Thermodynamics (FPE-0205), the credit recommendation for this course is reduced to 1 semester hour.

Location:
Power Generation Services Training Center, 506 East 75th St., New York, NY (through December 1992); The Learning Center, 43-82 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY (beginning January 1993); other company locations in the NY Metropolitan area.
Length:

Version 2, 3, and 4: 40 hours (1 week).

Dates:

Version 2: November 1985 - October 1992. Version 3: November 1992 - July 2002. Version 4: August 2002 - Present *

Objectives:

Version 2, 3, and 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe typical protective devices, instrumentation, transducers and sensors, and recognize proper configurations for the monitoring of processes; and describe normal protective practices employed in the operation of a power plant.

Instruction:

Version 2, 3, and 4: Major topics include: fundamentals of plant protection; electrical protection; boiler and turbine protection; logic diagrams and integrated plant protection; sensing, measuring, and controlling elements; controllers and final control elements; types of control; drum level and combustion control; boiler, turbine, and generator operations.

Credit recommendation:

Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Engineering Technology (9/77) (5/87 revalidation). Version 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Engineering Technology (10/92 revalidation) (10/97 revalidation). Version 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Marine/Mechanical Technology or Power Plant Technology (8/02 revalidation) (9/07 revalidation) (3/16 revalidation). *NOTE: An earlier version of this course, dating from January 1970 to October 1985, has been recommended for credit. Please consult the 1992 edition of this Directory for further information.

Location:
Hellgate Training Center, 910 East 134th Street, Bronx, NY (through December 1992); The Learning Center, 43-82 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, NY (beginning January 1993).
Length:
40 hours (5 days); includes 8 hours of supervised laboratory experience.
Dates:
February 1988 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to identify accepted inspection, testing, switching and work permit procedures for electrical distribution substation protective relay systems.

Instruction:

Lecture/demonstrations and laboratory exercises cover the following topics: area substation protection system; subtransmission and transmission feeder protection systems; bus and transformer protection; breaker protection; relay nameplates and target recording and reporting; automatic reclosures and rapid restoration and reset procedures; fault locators; relay switching operations; departmental inspection procedures; load management.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Electrical Power Technology or Industrial Technology (4/91) (5/96 revalidation) (8/01 revalidation) (8/06 revalidation) (3/16 revalidation).

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