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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Jewish Thought - Torah Accreditation Liaison

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offered as a proficiency examination or self-study format.

Dates:
March 2012 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate comprehension and analysis of the text of the essential sections of the traditional Jewish Siddur (Brachos, Supplications, Selections of Psalms and the Tanach) with a range of midrashic, medieval and modern commentaries; elaborate underlying meanings found in the text; expound on vague or obscure passages; explain halachic practices woven into the prayers; describe historical origins and explain various metaphysical allusions; and discuss a variety of issues in a relatively mature and sophisticated manner through through their responses to the examination questions.

Instruction:

Proficiency exam: The examination covers the essential sections of the traditional Jewish Siddur (Holy Names, Structure of Blessings, Birkas HaShachar, Birkas HaTorah, Pisukei Dezimra, Shema and its Brachos, Amida, Aleinu) with a range of midrashic, medieval and modern commentaries. Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials. The Advanced Concepts course focuses on conceptual, philosophical and ethical issues and their textual cues.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Jewish Thought, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (3/12) (3/17 revalidation). 

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offered as a proficiency examination or self-study format.

Dates:
March 2012 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to discuss and analyze the text of the essential sections of the traditional Jewish Siddur (Brachos, Supplications, Selections of Psalms and the Tanach).

Instruction:

Proficiency exam: The examination covers the main sections of the traditional Jewish Siddur, biblical sources, historical background, legal details and their reasoning and major themes. Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials. The course focuses on the conceptual underpinnings and the legal structure of the customs.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Jewish Thought, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (3/12) (3/17 revalidation). 

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offered as a proficiency examination or self-study format.

Dates:
Version 1: January 2008 - March 2014. Version 2: April 2014 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1: Students are required to display a basic knowledge of the mitzvos (overview, purpose, selections), fundamentals of Jewish philosophy, the oral and written Torah, the pillars of Jewish life, the idea of holiness, soul versus body, reward and punishment, the function of community from a Torah perspective and the concept of covenant, etc. Version 2: Students are required to display a basic knowledge of the mitzvos, fundamentals of Jewish belief in addition to the purpose and meaning of many Torah commandments and customs. Emphasis is placed on the Jewish approach to moral and ethical questions such as: the relationship between G-d given laws and absolute values, the sanctity of life, charity, and revenge.

Instruction:

Version 1: Proficiency exam: The examination is intended to measure a body of knowledge that candidates have acquired through prior learning experiences. Self-Study Format:  Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials. The course focuses on the foundations of Torah, such as the structure and reasons for the mitzvos, the basics of hashkafa and an overview of the elements that are contained within the written and oral Torah. Version 2: ​Proficiency exam: The course is intended to measure a body of knowledge that candidates have acquired through prior learning experiences and focuses on the foundations of Torah, such as the structure and reasons for the mitzvos, the basics of hashkafa and ethics. Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Ethics, or Religion (2/08) (3/17 revalidation). 

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offered as a proficiency examination or self-study format. 

Dates:
August 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

In addition to the Fundamental Concepts outcomes, students are required to display an in-depth understanding of all of the Jewish festivals; identify their historical and spiritual underpinnings; approach legal difficulties on a sophisticated level; recall and discuss the thematic structure of the halachos and minhagim of the festivals; and identify and differentiate between the customs of each holiday, their sources, symbolism and halachic parameters.

Instruction:

Proficiency exam: The examination is intended to measure a body of knowledge that candidates have acquired through prior learning experiences. Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials. Students must have an in-depth knowledge of the Moadim in terms of their sources, legal structure, halachos and minhagim, themes and symbolism; beyond the expectation to have a broad and sophisticated knowledge of the moadim students must display an ability to present ideas in an organized, creative and well supported fashion through descriptive and thematic essays. The course focuses on the conceptual underpinnings and legal structure of the festivals and their customs.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Jewish Thought, Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/06) (3/12 revalidation) (3/17 revalidation). 

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offered as a proficiency examination or self-study format.

Dates:
August 2006 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the exam, students are required to: display a broad knowledge of the customs of all of the Jewish festivals, their underlying concepts and themes; analyze legal reasoning and vignettes; and identify their historical, biblical or rabbinic sources.

Instruction:

Proficiency exam: The examination is intended to measure a body of knowledge that candidates have acquired through prior learning experiences.  Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials. Students are expected to be very familiar with all of the major Jewish holidays (shalosh regalim, fast days, Purim, Chanuka and High Holidays), their Biblical sources, historical background, legal details and their reasoning and major themes. The course focuses on the conceptual underpinnings and legal structure of the customs.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (12/06) (3/12 revalidation) (3/17 revalidation).

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offered as a proficiency examination or self-study format.  

Dates:
January 2008 - Present.
Objectives:

In addition to the Fundamental Concepts outcomes, students are required to display an in-depth understanding of all of the aspects of the Sabbath; identify their historical and spiritual underpinnings; approach legal difficulties on a sophisticated level; recall and discuss the thematic structure of the halachos and minhagim of the Sabbath; and identify and differentiate between each of the 39 malachos together with the other positive and negative aspects of the Sabbath, their sources, symbolism and halachic parameters.

Instruction:

Proficiency exam: The examination is intended to measure a body of knowledge that candidates have acquired through prior learning experiences. Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials.  Students must have an in-depth knowledge of the laws and customs of the Sabbath in terms of their sources, legal structure, halachos and minhagim, themes and symbolism; beyond the expectation to have a broad and sophisticated knowledge of the Sabbath students must display an ability to present ideas in an organized, creative and well supported fashion through descriptive and thematic essays. The course focuses on the conceptual underpinnings and legal structure of the Sabbath and their customs.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/08) (3/17 revalidation). 

Location:
Torah Accreditation Liaison (TAL) authorized proctor sites.
Length:

Varies; offered as a proficiency examination or self-study format.

Dates:
July 2008 - Present.
Objectives:
Students are required to display a broad knowledge of the customs of the Sabbath, their underlying concepts and themes; analyze legal reasoning and vignettes, identify their historical, biblical or rabbinic sources.
Instruction:

Proficiency exam: The examination is intended to measure a body of knowledge that candidates have acquired through prior learning experiences. Self-Study Format: Students are expected to master recommended readings and study guide materials. Students are expected to be very familiar with all of the aspects Sabbath (the 39 malachos, Kiddush, oneg and kavod, rabbinical restrictions, etc.); their Biblical sources, historical background, legal details and their reasoning and major themes. The course focuses on the conceptual underpinnings and legal structure of the customs.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, or Religion (2/08) (3/17 revalidation).

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