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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Retired Learning Experiences - EdTech Institute

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in Retired Learning Experiences - EdTech Institute

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Various approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:

Course 1: 30 hours (15 weeks). Course 2: 30 hours (15 weeks). Course 3: 12 hours (4 weeks). Course 4: 12 hours (4 weeks). Course 5: 42 hours (14 weeks).

Dates:

Course 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5: December 2008 - December 2018.

Objectives:

Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the relationship between hardware and software; describe peripheral devices; distinguish between types of storage devices; identify the main motherboard components; describe how instructions and data are stored on the motherboard; discuss how the CPU works and communicates with other devices; describe hardware and software interaction; identify system resources; outline the steps in booting up a computer; identify the properties of electricity; safeguard a computer system against electrical damage; identify computer cases and form factors; determine power requirements; troubleshoot power supply problems; identify types of motherboards; identify components on the motherboard; assemble a computer; install the motherboard; troubleshoot the motherboard; install peripheral I/O devices; use ports and expansion slots for add-on devices; install and troubleshoot keyboards; install and troubleshoot pointing devices; install and troubleshoot video cards and monitors; describe the different kinds of memory and how each kind works; upgrade and troubleshoot memory; discuss the workings of a floppy drive; manage floppy drives by using commands and Windows; replace a defective floppy drive, and add a second drive; identify various hard drive technologies; organize the hard disk logically to hold data; install a hard drive; manage and troubleshoot hard drives; discuss the basics of SCSI technology and its components; compare SCSI hard drives to IDE drives; troubleshoot SCSI devices; install various multimedia devices; describe optical storage technologies; discuss tape drives; evaluate and install removable drives; describe the use of hardware devices for fault tolerance; troubleshoot multimedia and mass storage devices; explain how a modem works and how to install it; use the AT command set to control a modem; troubleshoot problems related to modems; discuss the role of a PC technician in troubleshooting and maintenance, and discuss the tools used; approach a troubleshooting problem; develop a preventive maintenance plan; use guidelines when purchasing a PC; prepare for assembling a PC; assemble a PC from separately purchased parts. Course 2: Discuss how operating systems work, XP 2000 Windows operating systems, the differences between them and discuss advantages and disadvantages of common non-Windows operating systems; relate an OS to hardware and to other software, and launch an OS application; outline the steps to boot the computer, outline new features of Windows 2000 and describe the basic and dynamic disks, plan and perform the Windows 2000 installation, manage and use Windows 2000 and install hardware and applications with Windows 2000; outline the Windows 2000 boot process, troubleshoot the Windows 2000 boot process and use tools for maintenance, troubleshooting, and performance monitoring in Windows; outline the features and architecture of Windows XP, plan and perform Windows XP installation, customize the Windows XP desktop, manage audio and video, and allow multiple and remote logins under Windows XP, and install hardware and applications with Windows XP; use Windows XP features to secure the PC, view and update the Windows 2000/XP/2003 registry, use tools for troubleshooting and maintaining Windows XP, and troubleshoot the Windows XP boot process; support hard drives and tape backups, identify computer viruses and infestations and protection against them; outline the basics of networking, the different types of addresses used on networks, connect and share resources over a local area network and control a computer remotely; discuss how the OSI model applies to TCP/IP networks, such as the Internet, connect to the Internet using a dial-up connection, connect to the Internet using a cable modem or DSL connections and support some common Internet clients: discuss starting up, using and supporting hardware in the Mac OS, outline the file structure of the Linux OS and usage of some Linux commands, Windows 2000, and Windows XP notebook features and describe power management in notebooks. Course 3: Identify and open objects on the Windows desktop; use Windows XP Help and Support Center; navigate the folder hierarchy and search for files; manage files and folders and work with the Recycle Bin; create simple word processing documents and drawings by using the WordPad and Paint accessories; customize the desktop by creating desktop shortcuts and using the Control Panel; browse the Internet. Course 4: Customize the Start menu, taskbar and folder views; view and change file attributes and file associations; use advanced folder options; add a printer and manage print jobs with the print queue; manage user accounts; use fast user switching and employ basic user-level security; use System Restore, Disk Cleanup, Disk Defragmenter, Backup, and the Security Center; share folders and printer on a LAN and use shared resources. Course 5: Discuss basic networking concepts, including network types, network operating systems, server types, topologies, and planning in network design; explain the significance of the OSI Model, label the seven layers of the OSI Model, and describe the services provided by each layer of the OSI Model; discuss network adapter configuration, NDIS and ODI models, and troubleshoot network adapter problems; discuss the concept of protocols and channel access methods, and discuss transport, remote access, and security protocols; illustrate the basic properties, purpose, and functionality of network cabling, identify the characteristics and appropriate implementation techniques for various types of cables and connectors, and discuss Ethernet, Token Ring, and other devices; discuss inter networking, describe and contrast the functions of bridges, switches, and routers, and discuss routing protocols; describe the properties, benefits, and potential issues involved with POTS, ISDN, cable modem, xDSL, satellite, and wireless remote access methods, configure Windows XP/Server 2003 with a modem, establish a dial-up network connection by using Windows XP/Server2003, discuss Remote Access Service (RAS) and remote access clients, and discuss WAN connectivity; discuss the environmental factors that affect computer networks, define physical and logical indicators of network trouble, identify the function of common network tools, and discuss the science of troubleshooting; discuss the evolution of TCP/IP and the fundamentals of TCP/IP; identify each networked system as a host under TCP/IP, determine the IP address class and default subnet mask, and configure TCP/IP on a Windows XP/Server2003 computer; discuss the role of the HOSTS file, DNS, NETBIOS, LMHOSTS file, and WINS; discuss the purpose of firewalls and the functionality of a proxy server; identify the TCP/IP troubleshooting tools, discuss the Telnet utility, its functions, the functions the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) utility, and diagnose a problem and choose the appropriate troubleshooting tools; identify Network Operating Systems (NOS) features and discuss the features of Microsoft Windows, Novell NetWare, UNIX, Linux, Mac OS X Server and AppleShare IP; describe the network clients that are available to connect DOS-, Windows-, and Macintosh-based clients to a network; describe Windows security models, discuss directory services planning and implementation; describe Active Directory and the new features of Active Directory in Windows Server 2003; describe the Windows NT domain model, and explain the purpose of Novell Directory Services/eDirectory and the significance of NDS/eDirectory objects and bindery emulation; discuss user management and group management; identify the NTFS file system and file system security; explain shared folders and discuss Windows 2000/Server 2003 printing concepts; discuss Windows 2000/Server 2003 system monitoring using Task Manager; discuss troubleshooting using Event Viewer, and describe System Monitor and Performance Logs and Alerts; discuss user and group management in NetWare; describe file system security and rights and trustee assignments; discuss user account restrictions; explain NDS/eDirectory context; discuss NetWare log files, and use MONITOR.NLM, NetWare Remote Manager, as well as other utilities to monitor and manage a NetWare server and file system; discuss disk configuration, Windows-based replication, and NDS partitions and replicas, backup, and UPS; discuss the necessity of applying software patches and fixes, and describe viruses and anti-virus strategies; describe methods to help prioritize network problems, list the basic troubleshooting steps to be followed when working on a problem, and troubleshoot various problems that might occur on the network.

Instruction:

Course 1:  Major topics include: computer components; hardware and software interaction; electricity and power supplies; motherboards; supporting I/O devices; managing memory and floppy drives; hard drives; Small Computer System Interface (SCSI); multimedia devices and mass storage; supporting modems; troubleshooting and maintenance; purchasing or building a PC; error messages; interrupts; the PC technician. Course 2: Operating systems; hardware and software management; boot process and command line management; installing and using Windows 2000; managing and troubleshooting Windows 2000; installing and using Windows XP; managing and supporting Windows XP; hard drive support; Windows networking; Windows inter networking; Mac OS, Linux, and notebooks; error messages; character sets; the PC technician. Course 3: The help system; working with files; Word Pad and Paint; customizing the workstation. Course 4: Customizing the user interface; files and folders; print management; managing multiple users; system utilities; sharing LAN resources. Course 5: Basic networking concepts; the OSI Model; network adapters; introducing protocols; network cabling and devices; inter networking components; remote and WAN connectivity; troubleshooting hardware components; TCIP/IP fundamentals; TCIP/IP addressing and subnetting; name resolution; firewalls and proxies; troubleshooting network connectivity; identifying network operating system features; network clients; directory services; accessing and managing resources in a Windows network; monitoring and troubleshooting a Windows server; managing and troubleshooting NetWare network resources; fault tolerance and disaster recovery; routine maintenance; troubleshooting.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 5 semester hours distributed as follows: 3 semester hours in Information Technology and 2 semester hours in a Technology or Trades curriculum (12/08) (12/13 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 must all be completed to receive credit. NOTE: This series overlaps in full or in part with individual courses of the same titles, which carry discrete credit recommendations. Care should be taken to avoid awarding duplicate credit. *NOTE: Course numbers on transcripts may reflect different prefixes depending upon where a course is offered. Fiber Customer Support Analyst and Fiber Network Technician Series (500/1)

Location:
Various approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
Course 1: 30 hours (15 weeks). Course 2: 30 hours (15 weeks).
Dates:

Course 1 and 2: December 2008 - December 2018.

Objectives:

Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe the relationship between hardware and software; describe peripheral devices; distinguish between types of storage devices; identify the main motherboard components; describe how instructions and data are stored on the motherboard; discuss how the CPU works and communicates with other devices; describe hardware and software interaction; identify system resources; outline the steps in booting up a computer; identify the properties of electricity; safeguard a computer system against electrical damage; identify computer cases and form factors; determine power requirements; troubleshoot power supply problems; identify types of motherboards; identify components on the motherboard; assemble a computer; install the motherboard; troubleshoot the motherboard; install peripheral I/O devices; use ports and expansion slots for add-on devices; install and troubleshoot keyboards; install and troubleshoot pointing devices; install and troubleshoot video cards and monitors; describe the different kinds of memory and how each kind works; upgrade and troubleshoot memory; discuss the workings of a floppy drive; manage floppy drives by using commands and Windows; replace a defective floppy drive, and add a second drive; identify various hard drive technologies; organize the hard disk logically to hold data; install a hard drive; manage and troubleshoot hard drives; discuss the basics of SCSI technology and its components; compare SCSI hard drives to IDE drives; troubleshoot SCSI devices; install various multimedia devices; describe optical storage technologies; discuss tape drives; evaluate and install removable drives; describe the use of hardware devices for fault tolerance; troubleshoot multimedia and mass storage devices; explain how a modem works and how to install it; use the AT command set to control a modem; troubleshoot problems related to modems; discuss the role of a PC technician in troubleshooting and maintenance, and discuss the tools used; approach a troubleshooting problem; develop a preventive maintenance plan; use guidelines when purchasing a PC; prepare for assembling a PC; assemble a PC from separately purchased parts. Course 2: Students will be able to: discuss how operating systems work, XP 2000 Windows operating systems, the differences between them and discuss advantages and disadvantages of common non-Windows operating systems; relate an OS to hardware and to other software, and launch an OS application; outline the steps to boot the computer, outline new features of Windows 2000 and describe the basic and dynamic disks, plan and perform the Windows 2000 installation, manage and use Windows 2000 and install hardware and applications with Windows 2000; outline the Windows 2000 boot process, troubleshoot the Windows 2000 boot process and use tools for maintenance, troubleshooting, and performance monitoring in Windows; outline the features and architecture of Windows XP, plan and perform Windows XP installation, customize the Windows XP desktop, manage audio and video, and allow multiple and remote logins under Windows XP, and install hardware and applications with Windows XP; use Windows XP features to secure the PC, view and update the Windows 2000/XP/2003 registry, use tools for troubleshooting and maintaining Windows XP, and troubleshoot the Windows XP boot process; support hard drives and tape backups, identify computer viruses and infestations and protection against them; outline the basics of networking, the different types of addresses used on networks, connect and share resources over a local area network and control a computer remotely; discuss how the OSI model applies to TCP/IP networks, such as the Internet, connect to the Internet using a dial-up connection, connect to the Internet using a cable modem or DSL connections and support some common Internet clients: discuss starting up, using and supporting hardware in the Mac OS, outline the file structure of the Linux OS and usage of some Linux commands, Windows 2000, and Windows XP notebook features and describe power management in notebooks.

Instruction:

Course 1: Major topics include: computer components; hardware and software interaction; electricity and power supplies; motherboards; supporting I/O devices; managing memory and floppy drives; hard drives; Small Computer System Interface (SCSI); multimedia devices and mass storage; supporting modems; troubleshooting and maintenance; purchasing or building a PC; error messages; interrupts; the PC technician. Course 2: Operating systems; hardware and software management; boot process and command line management; installing and using Windows 2000; managing and troubleshooting Windows 2000; installing and using Windows XP; managing and supporting Windows XP; hard drive support; Windows networking; Windows inter networking; Mac OS, Linux, and notebooks; error messages; character sets; the PC technician.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Information Technology (2/10) (11/13 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 1 and 2 must both be completed to receive credit. NOTE: This series overlaps in full or in part with individual courses of the same titles, which carry discrete credit recommendations. Care should be taken to avoid awarding duplicate credit. *NOTE: Course numbers on transcripts may reflect different prefixes depending upon where a course is offered.

Location:
Various approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
Course 1: 30 hours (5 weeks). Course 2: 30 hours (5 weeks). Course 3: 24 hours (8 weeks). Course 4: 12 hours (4 weeks).
Dates:

Course 1, 2, 3, and 4: April 2008 - December 2018.

Objectives:

Course 1: Instructional: Students will be able to: define basic electrical terms: voltage, current, resistance; identify and explain the units of measurement for current and voltage; read simple schematic diagrams of electronic circuits; draw simple wiring symbols to represent electrical connections; identify and explain a series circuit; identify and explain a parallel circuit; use Ohm's Law to calculate voltage, current, or resistance; calculate combined resistance in a series or parallel circuit; calculate total current in a parallel circuit; apply Ohm's Law formulas in series or parallel circuits; define the terms: work, power, and energy; use Watt's Law to calculate power, current, or voltage in a circuit; identify and explain a sine wave; define inductance, capacitance, and impedance; identify and explain the units of measure for inductance, capacitance, and impedance; describe the basic structure and characteristics of a transformer; explain the step-up and step-down action of transformers; name the three meters combined in the V.O.M.; identify and explain the range switch, function switch and jacks on the Simpson 260 V.O.M.; connect a multimeter to a circuit to read voltage, current, or resistance; identify and explain circuit components by their symbols: voltage source, resistor, capacitor, inductor, transformer, voltmeter, ammeter, and switch; use correct circuit symbols to draw and electrical circuit. Laboratory/shop: Use a meter to measure voltage; plot voltage measurements on a graph; use a meter to measure current; plot current measurements on a graph; measure two known values and calculate a third unknown value using Ohm's Law; create a series resistive circuit, wire resistors in parallel; calculate and measure total resistance; arrange batteries in a series format; measure voltage value; make a simple wiring connection to increase total voltage; identify resistors; compare resistance readings. Course 2: Explain basic electrical terminology and theory; identify the rules governing series, parallel and combination circuits; explain the concept of impedance; calculate power gain using given formulas; identify the basic function of semiconductor devices. Course 3: Discuss basic concepts of electricity; identify the schematic symbol, and describe the basic function of electronic components; discuss the basic structure of engineering and scientific notations and convert between the two; identify the value and symbols for the seven common engineering notation prefixes; convert a value expressed with one engineering prefix to it's equivalent value expressed with a different engineering prefix; discuss the structure of the Base 2, 8, 10 and 16 number systems; convert a non-decimal number it's decimal equivalent; convert a Base 10 number to its Base 2, Base 8, and Base 16 equivalents; convert a Base 2 number to its Base 8 and Base 16 equivalents; convert a Base 8 number to its Base 2 and Base 16 equivalents; Demonstrate a technique to convert a Base 16 number to its Base 2; and Base 8 equivalents; identify the schematic symbol for logic gates; identify the truth table of the basic gates; describe the operation of the NOT, AND, OR, NAND, and NOR gates; Describe the relation of electrical logic levels to a binary digit's value; use basic digital data terminology; discuss the need for error checking in a communication system; discuss parity generation and checking; discuss the basic structure of a telephone network; discuss the basic purpose of a telephone switch; discuss the history of the development of the computer controlled telephone switch; discuss the basic functions of a modern telephone switch; discuss how a customer's analog signal is communicated between central offices; discuss the purpose of a repeater; discuss three types of distortion; discuss the advantages of digital information over analog information; discuss the basic process of analog/digital conversion and various types of encoding and modulation; discuss the purpose of multiplexing; discuss the basic principles of 3 types of multiplexing: SDM, FDM and TDM; discuss the purpose of line encoding; discuss the 3 types of digital data encoding: polar, unipolar, and bi-polar; describe the basic structure and operation of five types of data transmission media; discuss the advantages and disadvantages of five types of data transmission media; identify the names of and basic function of the hardware components in a personal computer; discuss the structure of serial and parallel data communication in a personal computer; discuss the purpose of computer languages; describe the purpose of and relation between: machine code, assembly language, and high level languages; discuss how information is represented by binary codes. Course 4: Operate and maintain a computer.

Instruction:

Course 1:  Major topics include: the language of electricity; using electricity at the workplace; Ohm's Law formula and application; DC series and parallel resistive circuits; power in electric circuits; impedance in AC circuits; measuring circuit values with meters; creating and measuring a voltage source; taking measurements with the ohmmeter; reading circuit diagrams. Course 2: Electrical terminology and theory review; combination circuits and how they function; power, decibels and logarithms; reading circuit diagrams; types of semiconductor devices and how they function. Course 3: Basic concepts of electricity; electrical signal terminology; basic electrical circuits; electrostatic discharge (ESD); waveforms; electronic components; basic function and schematic symbols of common electronic components; engineering and scientific notation; converting between scientific and engineering notation; converting an expression from one engineering prefix to a different engineering prefix; converting non-decimal numbers to decimal numbers; structure of positional numbers systems; converting decimal to non-decimal and non-decimal to decimal; converting a decimal number to non-decimal equivalent; converting a non-decimal number to a different non-decimal base; digital logic gates; definitions; symbols, truth tables and operation of gates; logic diagrams; logic circuit analysis technique; error checking and interactive review; digital data terminology; error checking; digital network; telephone network major components and functions; i.e., transmitting central office components and signals; types of distortion; advantages of digital over analog; disadvantages of digital over analog; analog to digital conversion process; digital to analog conversion process; multiplexing; line encoding; data transmission media; description and applications of various transmission media; advantages and disadvantages of various transmission media; function of basic components of a personal computer; data communication in a computer system; computer languages; information coding. Course 4: Elements of a computer; EMI; RFI; ESD; tools; safety methods; how system boards and power supplies function and their relation to other components within a computer; function of the BIOS, IRQs, CMOS, and how thy relate to one another; explanation of the CPU; expansion bus; memory; removal, examination, and reinstallation of components; differences between various printer and scanner types; different types of storage devices, media types, and how storage devices interact with the computer; function of the POS and how it can be utilized in the troubleshooting process; portable computing, including various types, power requirements; and uses of portable computers; general troubleshooting basics.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2, 3, and 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours as a technical elective OR in the associate degree/certificate category, 2 semester hours in a Trades curriculum (4/08) (8/08) (12/08 revalidation) (12/13 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4 must all be completed to receive credit. NOTE: This series overlaps in full or in part with individual courses of the same titles, which carry discrete credit recommendations. Care should be taken to avoid awarding duplicate credit. *NOTE: Course numbers on transcripts may reflect different prefixes depending upon where a course is offered.

Location:
Various approved locations throughout the U.S.
Length:
Course 1: 15 hours (5 weeks). Course 2: 18 hours (6 weeks). Course 3: 21 hours (7 weeks).
Dates:

Course 1 and 2: March 2006 - November 2010; May 2014 - December 2016. Course 3: March 2006 - December 2016.

Objectives:

Course 1: Identify the functions of a call center and determine the process for setting up a call center; identify the categories of ACD, technologies to monitor your employees, the benefits of skill-based routing, and how to determine call load and staffing; motivate employees, communicate effectively with employees, evaluate employee performance, and identify methods for monitoring employees; reduce employee turnover, manage stress, and train employees; identify customer expectations and manage customer relationships; set and achieve service levels, and use reports; identify the information that executives need and learn how to communicate with them. Course 2: Identify the goals and types of customer relationship management, and develop a customer relationship management program; manage and reduce costs associated with CRM implementation, and plan a CRM implementation; redesign work processes, identify reasons for implementing CRM in stages, and implement CRM; identify the features and disadvantages of eCRM, and automate CRM through CRM. Course 3: Distinguish among the different types of customers, appreciate the importance of customer service, build rapport and communicate with customers, and respond to customers while exceeding their expectations; develop customer service skills, provide quality customer service, and solve customer service problems; understand customer dissatisfaction, work with customers who are either angry or upset, and reduce customer service stress; understand the importance of effective communication, identify the importance of interpersonal communication, provide quality service on the telephone, and compose effective e-mail messages; discuss the basics of service standards, monitor service standards, and understand how management standards support exceptional customer service; build customer service teams, select right employees through effective screening and interviews, provide training and empowerment, and motivate employees to maintain desirable behaviors; understand their customers and how they measure service, develop loyalty in customers, understand how employee loyalty affects service, and create memorable service.

Instruction:

Course 1: Topics include: establishing and setting up a call center; service and information technology; call load and staffing; employee motivation; communication with employees; employee performance evaluation; employee monitoring tools; reducing turnover; stress management; training; customer expectations; customer relationship management; setting and achieving service levels; analyzing reports; information that executives need; communicating with executives. Course 2: Customer loyalty; market intelligence enterprise; customer information; a customer relationship management (CRM) program; CRM and expenditures; implementation planning; CRM implementation preparation; the implementation process; eCRM fundamentals; eCRM and automation; eCRM customization; eCRM goals. Course 3: Fundamentals of service standards; monitoring service standards; teams as a service solution; team training and empowerment; motivation; understanding customers; customer loyalty development; influence of employee loyalty; memorable service.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours as an elective in business, telecommunications management, or any discipline that would benefit from such a complementary learning experience (3/06) (5/14 Administrative Review). NOTE: Courses 1, 2, and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. *NOTE: Course numbers on transcripts may reflect different prefixes depending upon where a course is offered.

Location:
Various approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
Course 1: 30 hours (5 weeks). Course 2: 30 hours (5 weeks).
Dates:

Course 1 and 2: April 2008 - December 2019.

Objectives:

Course 1 and 2: Upon successful complletion of the course, students will be able to: identify and describe the functions of each of the seven layers of the OSI reference model; identify the reasons why the networking industry uses a layered model; define and explain the conversion steps of data encapsulation; define and describe the function of a MAC address; describe connection-oriented network service and connectionless network service, and identify the key differences between them; explain the uses, advantages, and disadvantages of repeaters; explain the uses, advantages, and disadvantages of hubs; define wireless access points; define network segmentation; explain network segmentation using bridges; explain network segmentation using switches; explain network segmentation using routers; explain network segmentation using routers and gateways; discuss the origins of TCP/IP; understand the different classes of IP addresses; configure and verify IP addresses; subdivide an IP network; identify and discuss the different layer functions of TCP/IP; describe the functions performed by protocols in the TCP/IP protocol suite, including ICMP, UDP, TCP, ARP, and RARP; use ping and trace and describe their functions; understand advanced routing concepts such as CIDR, summarization, and VLSM; discuss the different physical topologies; describe various network architecture models; determine which types of network media to use given a set of requirements; understand horizontal cabling standards and wiring closets; consider performance requirements and improvements for given situations; install a telecommunications connector; wire a patch panel; test network cable; discuss LAN design; describe the function that network-management tools perform on a network; describe WAN standards; explain the WAN connection methods; discuss WAN data link protocols; understand the WAN physical layer; recognize the various WAN physical topologies; emerging WAN connection methods; describe the benefits of network segmentation with routers; understand the elements of the Cisco router user interface; configure the Hyper Terminal program to interface with the Cisco router; describe the various router configuration modes; describe the various router passwords; understand the enhanced editing features of the Cisco IOS; understand the elements of the Cisco switch user interface; compare router components to typical PC components; understand router startup; describe and use the Cisco Discovery Protocol; understand configuration management commands for Cisco router and the 1900 series switch; configure IP on the Cisco router and the 1900 series switch; troubleshoot router connectivity problems; understand the purpose and operation of network address translation (NAT); configure static NAT, dynamic NAT, and dynamic NAT with overload; understand and configure port address translation (PAT); differentiate between nonroutable, routed, and routing protocols; define Interior Gateway Protocols, Exterior Gateway Protocols, distance-vector routing protocols, and link-state routing protocols; explain the concepts of count-to-infinity, split horizon, split horizon with poison reverse, and hold-down timers; describe, configure, and monitor the interior routing protocols RIP and IGRP; explain static routing and administrative distance; configure static routing and default routes; describe classful and classless routing protocols; describe and configure RIPv2; describe and configure EIGRP; describe and configure OSPF; control routing traffic; describe the usage and rules of access lists; establish standard IP access lists; produce extended IP access lists; apply access lists to interfaces; monitor and verify access lists; describe PPP encapsulation; configure PPP encapsulation and its options; describe and enable PPP multilink; explain how to implement ISDN BRI on Cisco routers; configure an ISDN BRI connection; understand Frame Relay standards and equipment; describe the role of virtual circuits and performance parameters in Frame Relay; understand the Frame Relay topologies; understand the difference between multipoint and point-to-point configurations; configure and monitor Frame Relay; explain the features and benefits of Fast Ethernet; describe the guidelines and distance limitations of Fast Ethernet; define full- and half-duplex Ethernet operations; distinguish between cut-through, fragment-free, and store-and-forward LAN switching; define the operation of the Spanning Tree Protocol and its benefits; describe the benefits of virtual LANs; and explain the purpose of the VLAN trunking protocol (VTP).

Instruction:

Course 1 and 2: Major topics include: introducing networks; network devices; TCP/IP and IP addressing; network topology and design; WAN concepts; router and IOS basics; router startup and configuration; routing protocols and network address translation; advanced routing protocols; access lists; PPP and ISDN; frame relay; switching and VLANs; CCNA certification objectives.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Information Technology (4/08) (11/14 administrative review) (1/15 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 1 and 2 must both be completed to receive credit. NOTE: These courses overlap in content with CCNA Cisco Networking (082) and the four-course sequence Cisco Certified Network Associate (233 - 236). Credit should only be awarded once. *NOTE: Course numbers on transcripts may reflect different prefixes depending upon where a course is offered.

Location:
Various approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
Version 1: Course 1: 21 hours (7 weeks); Course 2: 18 hours (6 weeks); Course 3: 12 hours (4 weeks). Version 2: Course 1: 30 hours (10 weeks) Course 2: 30 hours (10 weeks) Course 3: 30 hours (10 weeks)
Dates:

Version 1: Course 1, 2, or 3: December 2005 - March 2006. Version 2: Course 1, 2, 3: February 2013 - December 2018.

Objectives:

Version 1: Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define networking and identify network architectures, network topology characteristics, and the major network operating systems; explain the Open Systems Interconnection reference model (OSI/RM) and its relationship to the packet creation process and TCP/IP; identify the network devices associated with LANs and WANs and the common cable types used in networking, including coaxial, fiber optic, and twisted pair; explain the TCP/IP architecture, including the TCP/IP suite protocols and their respective RFCs; describe the routing process; identify IP address classes and reserved IP addresses; determine default and custom subnet masks; describe various diagnostic tools for troubleshooting TCP/IP networks. Version 2: Course 1: define networking, and identify network architectures, network topology characteristics, cable distribution schemes, and network media and cabling procedures; identify major industry standards bodies, and obtain and read standards documents; compare and contrast various data and voice transmission technologies, including E-carrier, T-carrier, Synchronous Optical Network/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SONET/SDH) and Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN); explain the Open Systems Interconnection reference model (OSI/RM) and its relationship to the packet creation process and TCP/IP; identify the network devices associated with LANs and WANs, and the common cable types used in networking, including coaxial, fiber optic and twisted pair; define networking methods, standards and protocols, and their characteristics; explain the concept of protocol tunneling, and identify elements and benefits of using a Virtual Private Network (VPN) in a convergent network; identify wireless networking equipment and functionality, describe wireless settings, and identify security issues inherent to wireless networks; explain the TCP/IP architecture, including the TCP/IP suite protocols, and common ports and services; describe the routing process; identify IP address classes, reserved IP addresses, IP addressing rules, and methods for IP address conservation; determine default and custom subnet masks, and use CIDR notation; identify the need for Quality of Service (QoS) in convergent networks, and identify QoS technologies; identify the elements and benefits of Virtual LANs (VLANs) in convergent networks; and describe various diagnostic tools for troubleshooting TCP/IP networks. Version 1: Course 2: identify the call processing steps (call setup, call connection, call completion); compare analog trunks and station lines; identify electrical characteristics of ground-start and loop-start analog trunks; identify the various types of E&M trunks; describe different Digital Signal Hierarchy (DSH) technologies; describe Pulse Code Modulation in telephony; identify the functions of CLASS 4 (tandem) and CLASS 5 (end-office) switches in regard to PSTN/GSTN; describe various numbering plans (global, NANP, private); identify the differences between FXO and FXS interfaces; identify safety procedures (cabling, power, grounding, ESD, NEBS); identify troubleshooting tools (4-pair tester, inductor/buzzer/toner), lineman's test handset (butt set), volt meter and laptop; identify various cable terminations (USOC/RJ-nn and ITU/V.nn standards). Version 2: Course 2: define codec, and describe the G.711 protocol; Define Pulse Code Modulation (PCM), and distinguish between the u- Law and A-Law commanding algorithms; explain common feature sets for voice calls, including call waiting, call blocking, call forwarding, call monitoring, callback, and additional private network features; Explain Direct Inward Dialing (DID); Define hunt groups; Identify elements of a call center or contact center, including call routing, caller ID, automatic call distributors, pop-ups, instant messaging/chat, e-mail, real-time voice and data recording/storage, hosted solutions, and elements of Computer Telephony Integration (CTI); explain the purpose of network termination equipment (NTE), including timing, conversion of signaling types, troubleshooting interface; Identify symptoms of improper clocking configuration (e.g., problems with synchronization); Resolve problems when connecting time division multiplexing (TDM) networks (e.g., in-band and out- of-band signaling, digital and analog setup messages, safety practices and standards, crosstalk, split, line imbalance, open, short, grounding issues, echo cancellation in two- wire-to-four-wire hybrids); Identify and use appropriate troubleshooting tools (e.g., four-pair tester, tone-and-probe kit, analog and/or digital butt set, volt meter, time domain reflectometer); identify safety procedures for working with convergent network equipment (e.g., power, proper grounding, electrostatic discharge [ESD], radio frequency interference [RFI], electromagnetic interference [EMI]); Identify basic ISDN services and protocols, including time slots, channels, ISDN2e/Basic Rate Interface (BRI), ISDN30/Primary Rate Inter- face (PRI); define the Q.931, Q.932, I.430 and Q.921/High-level Data Link Control (HDLC) standards, including identifying the typical call progress signals (e.g., alerting, call proceeding, etc.); define QSIG, H.450 (including supplementary services), Digital Access Signaling System 1 (DASS1), private networking, and Digital Private Network Signaling System (DPNSS); Define Signaling System 7 (SS7)/Common Channel Signaling 7 (C7) functions, including call setup, management and teardown; signaling links; signaling points (e.g., service switching point [SSP], signal transfer point [STP], service control point [SCP]). Version 1: Course 3: identify the major industry standards and organizations relevant to convergence technologies; identify components and characteristics of a VoIP network; define the Quality of Service (QoS) technologies used in convergence networks; identify the characteristics of circuit-switched and packet-switched networks; identify the functions of signaling protocols used in convergence networks; configure and utilize an Internet voice connection using Windows Net meeting. Version 2: Course 3: compare and contrast circuit-switched and packet-switched technologies; define the Realtime Transport Protocol (RTP) and the Realtime Transport Control Protocol (RTCP); identify the components of Session Initiation Protocol (SIP); identify the functions of signaling protocols for converged networks; compare and contrast the functions of gatekeepers, gateways and proxies in relation to SIP and H.323 devices; identify the essential elements of a convergent network, and list the essential steps for qualifying a network's ability to support convergence; identify common G.7xx codecs and their bandwidth requirements in a converged environment; calculate and estimate bandwidth usage for various codecs, including considerations for overhead and connection quality; explain wireless convergence technologies, including Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications (DECT) and Personal Wireless Telephone (PWT); identify elements of the IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS); identify the features, benefits, problems and management of presenting; list unified messaging methods and benefits; identify common and essential videoconferencing codecs, standards and practices; explain the fundamentals of Internet Protocol television (IPTV); define latency, jitter and wander, and implement methods for reducing each; identify factors that affect the bandwidth of voice and video calls on convergent networks; analyze traffic in a convergent network, and resolve problems using a packet sniffer, monitoring software and hardware solutions; identify types and effects of attacks in convergent networks, including man-in-the-middle attacks, voice mail compromises, viruses, brute- force and dictionary attacks, zero-day attacks, illicit servers, toll fraud and unsolicited calls; and explain the practice and impact of VLAN hopping; and identify types of intrusion detection.

Instruction:

Version 1: Course 1: Topics include: data networking; network operating systems; networking protocols; binding and configuring TCP/IP; LANs and WANs; wiring an RJ-45 cable; TCP/IP suite and internet addressing; TCP/IP protocols; local and remote destination node; converting internet addresses; determining default subnet masks; determining subnet masks and address ranges; determining network address ranges, subnet masks, and CIDR notation; configuring TCP/IP properties; TCP/IP troubleshooting; locating and viewing TCP/IP information in the protocol and services files; using the ping command; using the tracert program; identifying IP configuration and hardware address information; viewing the ARP cache; using the nbstat command. Version 2: Course 1: The Data Networking course covers the fundamentals of networking. Through hands-on training, participants will gain the networking skills and concepts required for entry-level professionals seeking employment in the Information Technology (IT) or the telecommunications industries. Version 1: Course 2: Telephony essentials; local telephone connections; the local loop; creating a telephone cable; infrastructure issues and standards; troubleshooting; testing tools; analog and digital signaling. Version 2: Course 2: The Telephony Networking course covers how to install and troubleshoot analog and digital phone lines in home and PBX installations. Participants will gain skills in basic telephony concepts, including earth-start and loop-start trunks, common telephony standards, and PBX elements. Version 1: Course 3: Industry standards and protocols; researching standards; enabling voice over IP; configuring Windows Net meeting for VoIP transmissions; conducting a VoIP call using Net meeting; network convergence; comparing codecs in a VoIP implementation. Version 2: Course 3: The Convergence Technologies course covers the fundamental concepts, standards and practices that combine telephony and data networks into convergence networks. Topics include industry standards and protocols, Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), and network convergence.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: Course 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in a Technology or Telecommunications degree program or as a laboratory in a Technology or Telecommunications degree program, OR in the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours as a laboratory in a Trades curriculum (12/05). NOTE: Version 1: Course 1,2, and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. Version 2: Course 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in a Technology or Telecommunications degree program or as a laboratory in a Technology or Telecommunications degree program or in the associate degree/certificate category, 6 semester hours as a laboratory in a Trades curriculum (2/13 revalidation). NOTE: Version 2: Courses may be awarded discrete credit up to 2 semester hours each if taken separately. NOTE: This three-course sequence of the same name with course numbers (224 1, 2, and 3), and VoIP Convergence Technologies Series (216/316) overlap in content. Credit should be awarded for only one of these learning experiences, if a student should successfully complete more than one. course. *NOTE: Course numbers on transcripts may reflect different prefixes depending upon where a course is offered.

Location:
Various approved locations throughout the United States.
Length:
Course 1: 27 hours (9 weeks); Course 2: 18 hours (6 weeks); Course 3: 18 hours (6 weeks).
Dates:

Course 1, 2, and 3: March 2006 - December 2012. 

Objectives:

Course 1: Students will be able to: define networking and identify network architectures, network topology characteristics, and the major network operating systems; define networking and identify network architectures, network topology characteristics, and the major network operating systems; explain the pen Systems Interconnection reference model (OSI/RM) and its relationship to the packet creation process and TCP/IP; identify the network devices associated with LANs and WANs, and the common cable types used in networking, including coaxial, fiber optic, and twisted pair; explain the TCP/IP architecture, including the TCP/IP suite protocols and their respective RFCs; describe the routing process; identify IP address classes and reserved IP addresses; determine default and custom subnet masks; describe various diagnostic tools for troubleshooting TCP/IP networks. Course 2: Students will be able to: recognize standard reference nomenclature; identify the call-processing steps; compare and contrast analog trunks and station lines; identify electrical characteristics of ground-start and loop-start analog trunks; identify the various types of E&M trunks in relation to analog trunks; identify various DSH technologies; compare and contrast analog ringing vs. digital alerting in relation to signaling types; identify the primary analog transmission impairments involved in a phone call; identify the need for echo cancellation in 2-wire to 4-wire hybrids; define Pulse Code Modulation in telephony; identify the functions of class 4 (tandem) and class 5 (end-office) switches in relation to PSTN/GSTN; identify various numbering plans; recognize Digital Signal Hierarchy (DSH) terminology (STRATUM); distinguish between FXO and FXS interfaces;identify safety procedures; determine proper cabling procedures in specific environments (PVC vs. plenum); identify troubleshooting tools; identify the symptoms of improper clocking configuration; identify various cable terminations; compare and contrast the signaling of ground-start and loop-start analog trunks; compare and contrast in-band and out-of-band signaling; describe the signaling functions of ISDN and SS7; compare and contrast E&M, ground start, loop start, and OPX in relation to signaling types (A, B, C and D bits); compare and contrast analog dialing (DTMF) vs. digital addressing (set-up messages) in relation to signaling types. Course 3: Students will be able to: discuss the various standards agencies in the telecommunications industry; discuss the major industry standards in convergence technologies; identify and define the various IEEE 802 and ITU protocols; discuss Requests for Comments (RFCs) used in convergence technologies; discuss the functions of gatekeepers and gateways; define delay, latency, jitter and wander, and identify their impact on real-time communications; identify the importance of a jitter buffer; identify the impact of large data frames on real-time communications; recognize the need for Quality of Service (QoS) for converged networks; identify QoS technologies for converged networks; identify common codecs and their bandwidth requirements in a converged environment; describe the impact of compressing voice in a network; compare and contrast the use of T1, E1 and J1 trunks for data and voice; identify the factors that affect the bandwidth of packetized voice; identify requirements for transporting modem and fax transmissions through a converged solution; identify the characteristics of circuit-switched and packet-switched technologies; identify the differences between the call flow in convergence-based calls and the call flow in circuit-based calls; and discuss how IPTV works and the underlying technology.

Instruction:

Course 1: Major topics include: data networking; network operating systems; networking protocols; binding and configuring TCP/IP; LANs and WANs; wiring an RJ-45 cable; TCP/IP suite and internet addressing; TCP/IP protocols; local and remote destination node; converting internet addresses; determining default subnet masks; determining subnet masks and address ranges; determining network address ranges, subnet masks, and CIDR notation; configuring TCP/IP properties; TCP/IP troubleshooting; locating and viewing TCP/IP information in the protocol and services files; using the ping command; using the tracert program; identifying IP configuration and hardware address information; viewing the ARP cache; using the nbstat command. Course 2: Telephony essentials; local telephone connections; the local loop; creating a telephone cable; infrastructure issues and standards; troubleshooting; testing tools; analog and digital signaling. Course 3: Industry standards and protocols; researching standards; enabling voice over IP; configuring Windows Net meeting for VoIP transmissions; conducting a VoIP call using Net meeting; network convergence; comparing codecs in a VoIP and IPTV implementation.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in a Technology or Telecommunications degree program or as a laboratory in a Technology or Telecommunications degree program OR in the associate degree/certificate category, 1 semester hour as a laboratory in a Trades curriculum (2/07). NOTE: Course 1, 2 and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. NOTE: This three-course sequence of the same name with course numbers (216 A, B, and C), and VoIP Convergence Technologies Series (216) overlap in content. Credit should be awarded for only one of these learning experiences, if students successfully complete more than one course. *NOTE: Course numbers on transcripts may reflect different prefixes depending upon where a course is offered.

Location:
Various approved locations throughout the U.S.
Length:

Course 1: 15 hours (5 weeks). Course 2: 15 hours (5 weeks).

Dates:

Course 1 and 2: April 2006 - December 2018.

Objectives:

Course 1 and 2: Students will be able to: discuss basic terminology and concepts; discuss the history of fiber optics communications; discuss basics of fiber optics technology, the components used, and their installation; discuss applications of fiber optics communications systems; describe common types of cables and discuss where they are used; identify basic types of connections and splices; prepare fiber optic cable; pull, splice, and terminate fiber optic cable; and  test fiber optic cable using power meters and OTDRs.

Instruction:

Course 1 and 2: These courses address applications of fiber optics including telephone, CATV, and computer networks. Discussion centers on the basics of technology, the components used, and how to design and install fiber optics; new applications, and new components and processes that have become widely used in the industry; and the future of this rapidly evolving technology. Topics include: basics of fiber optic technology, components, and applications; industry standards that apply to the cable plant, installation, and testing; safety and how to handle and install fiber optic components safely; how fiber optics is used in telecom, data communications, CATV networks, CCTV, security, and process control; the basics of network cable plant design; cable types and specifications; choosing an appropriate cable, handling cables, and pulling cables; connector types, terminating, fusion and mechanical splices, and installation tools; installation of connectors on fiber optic cables; test procedures, specifications, and standards; types of fiber optic test equipment, specifications, and applications; and performing basic tests; testing cables, connectors, splices, network equipment, fault location, and testing installed cables with OTDRs. Laboratory exercises support instruction.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour as a technical elective or in the associate degree/certificate category, 1 semester hour in a Trades curriculum (4/08) (8/08) (12/13 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 1 and 2 must both be completed to receive credit. *NOTE: Course numbers on transcripts may reflect different prefixes depending upon where a course is offered. NOTE: These courses overlap in content with the course grouping containing Introduction to Fiber Optics (080) and Fusion Splicing (080/3), as well as Introduction to Fiber Optics (080), Fiber Optics (080/2), Fiber Optics with Fiber to the Premises (080/4), and FTTX Concepts (080/5). Credit should not total more than 2 semester hours for any combination of these courses.

Location:
Various approved locations throughout the U.S.
Length:
Version 1: Part A: 28 hours (7 weeks). Part B: 30 hours (8 weeks). Version 2: 48 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:

Version 1: Parts A and B: January 2005 - November 2007. Version 2: December 2007 - December 2012. 

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: listen, speak, read, and write in Spanish at an introductory level; comprehend the main ideas of aural sentences, short routine conversations, simple announcements, and reports of increasingly complex topics through dialogue; comprehend and respond to a variety of communicative tasks and social situations; comprehend basic ideas of written Spanish dealing with a variety of basic and social needs; create and connect structurally simple statements or questions in writing involving preferences, everyday events, and daily routines; discuss the values, traditions, and contemporary life of Hispanic cultures; comprehend aural discourse referring to basic personal background and needs, lodging, transportation, and shopping; comprehend a diversity of aural instructions and directions, face-to-face conversations, telephone conversations, and simple media broadcasts in Spanish; participate in simple conversations about self and family members; ask and answer common questions orally; make statements and express opinions about familiar topics; respond to unfamiliar questions on familiar topics; give instructions using simple commands; pronounce Spanish clearly; use sufficient vocabulary to participate in social conversations; use grammatical structures and past, present, and future verb tenses, including irregulars within structured situations; read short, straightforward descriptions written in Spanish for a wide audience; read a Spanish text with increasingly complex topics with the aid of a Spanish dictionary; summarize orally or in writing the content of a reading selection; read selections about the culture of the Spanish-speaking world; reflect on issues and appreciate the diversity in Hispanic cultures; create structurally simple sentences and questions in writing; express present, past, and future time consistently; write with minimal errors short compositions on an assigned topic; and write a simple paragraph using correct sentence structure.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: This course continues the program of language acquisition and follows Beginning Spanish or equivalent. These components are designed to broaden students' level of achievement in basic skills, with emphasis on communication. Students expand their acquisition of vocabulary, their control of structure, and their ability to communicate about their daily lives, express their opinions, and supply real information. Content covered includes: Part A: Interrogative words; stem-changing verbs; negative and affirmative expressions; formal and familiar commands; position of adjectives, shortened forms of the adjectives, and adverbs; reflexive verbs; preterite tense; imperfect tense; comparison of the preterite and imperfect tenses; and demonstrative adjectives and pronouns. Part B: Direct object pronouns; indirect object pronouns; double object pronouns; personal pronouns as objects of prepositions; cardinal and ordinal numbers; spelling-changing verbs; comparing people and things; future tense of regular verbs; future tense of irregular verbs; past participles and present perfect tense; application of vocabulary and grammar to the basics of business activities.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: Part A: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Spanish (1/05). Version 1: Part B: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Spanish (1/05). Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Spanish (12/07 revalidation). NOTE: Version 1 and 2 of this course and Beginning Spanish, when combined, are comparable to a semester-length, first course in Spanish. *NOTE: Course numbers on transcripts may reflect different prefixes depending upon where a course is offered.

Location:
Various approved locations throughout the U.S.
Length:
Course 1: 30 hours (13 weeks). Course 2: 18 hours (6 weeks).
Dates:

Course 1: February 2005 - December 2018. Course 2: September 2006 - December 2018.

Objectives:

Course 1: Students will be able to: discuss basic terminology and concepts; discuss the history of fiber optics communications; discuss basics of fiber optics technology, the components used, and their installation; discuss applications of fiber optics communications systems; describe common types of cables and discuss where they are used; identify basic types of connections and splices; prepare fiber optic cable; pull, splice, and terminate fiber optic cable; test fiber optic cable using power meters and OTDRs; prepare the cable. Course 2: Students will be able to: discuss the theory and practice of fusion splicing fiber optics; compare mechanical splicing and fusion splicing; operate a fiber optic fusion splicer; prepare and cleave the fiber; protect and evaluate splice quality; measure splice loss; troubleshoot problems that occur in fusion splicing.

Instruction:

Course 1: This course addresses applications of fiber optics including telephone, CATV, and computer networks. Discussion focuses on the basics of technology, the components used, and how to design and install fiber optics; new applications, and new components and processes that have become widely used in the industry; and the future of this rapidly evolving technology. Topics include: basics of fiber optic technology, components, and applications; industry standards that apply to the cable plant, installation, and testing; safety and how to handle and install fiber optic components safely; how fiber optics is used in telecom, data communications, CATV networks, CCTV, security, and process control; the basics of network cable plant design; cable types and specifications; choosing an appropriate cable, handling cables, and pulling cables; connector types, terminating, fusion and mechanical splices, and installation tools; installation of connectors on fiber optic cables; test procedures, specifications, and standards; types of fiber optic test equipment, specifications, and applications; and performing basic tests; testing cables, connectors, splices, network equipment, fault location, and testing installed cables with OTDRs; fusion splicing. Laboratory exercises support instruction. Course 2: This course is a continuation of Fiber Optics (080). Topics include: fusion splicing; comparing fusion splicing to mechanical splicing; using a fusion splicer; preparing the fiber; loading the splicer; splicing fibers; protecting the splice; splice troubleshooting; basic safety rules. Laboratory exercises support instruction.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour as a technical elective or in the associate degree/certificate category, 1 semester hour in a Trades curriculum (9/06) (12/13 revalidation). *NOTE: Course numbers on transcripts may reflect different prefixes depending upon where a course is offered. NOTE: These courses overlap in content with Introduction to Fiber Optics (080), as well as the grouping Fiber Optics: Part 1 (238) and Fiber Optics: Part 2 (239), Fiber Optics (080/2), Fiber Optics with Fiber to the Premises (080/4), and FTTX Concepts (080/5). Credit should not total more than 2 semester hours for any combination of these courses.

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