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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Terminated Courses

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:
Course 1: 160 hours (4 weeks); Course 2: 120 hours (3 weeks); Course 3: 120 hours (3 weeks).
Dates:

Course 1, 2 and 3: September 2007 - September 2012.

Objectives:

Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: follow proper procedures when processing various types of alarms, use the 10 code and portray effective and proper customer relations. Course 2: Students will be able to: effectively use the various screens, be familiar with assigned geographical area, properly process alarms and detect needed coverage for battalion chiefs and special units. Course 3: Students will be able to: operate radio and voice alarms in a public safety communications center.

Instruction:

Course 1: Major topics include: fire alarm dispatching; role of 5 CADS positions; DD 96-01; request for assistance; proper handling of complaints. Course 2: CADS system; equipment for Decision Dispatcher use; various screen uses; assigning of units and handling of various types of alarms. Course 3: Overview of voice alarm position; prioritizing functions at the voice alarm position; similarities and differences-radio and voice alarm; developing shorthand for radio communications; preliminary reports; citywide relays; introduction to SEP (Status Entry Panel); emphasis on radio operations with voice alarm support.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, 2, and 3: In the associate degree/certificate category, 1 semester hour in Public Safety Communications (11/07 revalidation). NOTE: Course 1, 2, and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. NOTE: These courses are now listed as individual courses and are listed alphabetically with discrete credit recommendations (5/12).

Length:
40 hours (5 days).
Dates:

January 2006 - May 2015.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to safely stabilize the interior and exterior of a collapsed structure using a variety of wood and prefabricated shoring so as to conduct safe search and rescue operations.

Instruction:

Major topics covered in the course are review of basic shoring principles; introduction to laced post shores, sloped floor shores, and split-sole raker shore systems. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, video, demonstrations, a quiz and competency based performance testing. NOTE: This course is now included in Collapse Rescue Operations (SOC 200).

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Fire Science, Emergency Medical Services (7/10). NOTE: Successful completion of this course requires a demonstrated knowledge of the principles of Physics.

Length:
182 hours (5.5 weeks).*
Dates:
January 2002 - September 2007.**
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: deploy, coordinate, and direct fire suppression personnel during fire fighting operations; assess fire conditions, both initially and throughout fire operations; exercise command and control of personnel during firefighting operations; evaluate structural integrity of buildings during operations; utilize personnel and equipment within established safety parameters; develop proper firefighting strategy, dependent on conditions encountered; implement the Incident Command System of control and coordination for operations; determine if fire was accidental or suspicious; record all pertinent information regarding operations for necessary reports; apply appropriate resources to mitigate hazardous materials; apply knowledge of building construction to predicting fire travel and extension in various structures; maintain effective communication between units at scene and department dispatcher; prepare and transmit ongoing evaluation reports of fire conditions; determine effectiveness of on-scene resources and implementation of additional resources to manage the situation; perform tasks of a middle level manager in administration of multiple fire companies; oversee and coordinate the operations in fire, multiple casualty, and emergency medical incidents.

Instruction:

Major topics include: accident investigation; administrative procedures; brownstone building operations; building collapse operations; building construction; building inspection supervision; commercial building operations; confined space operations; EMS protocol; fire investigation; fire report preparation; fire-ground communications; foam operations; hazardous materials operations; high rise building operations; hydraulics; Incident Command System; leadership; loft building operations; marine company operations; multiple dwelling operations; new types of building construction; private dwelling operations; row frame dwelling operations; safety operations; scaffolding operations; subway operations; training; utility emergencies.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Strategic Management of Fire and Rescue Operations, and 1 semester hour in Hazardous Materials, and 1 semester hour in Leadership (9/02). *NOTE: This course includes Safety Coordinator instruction, which is recommended for credit separately. Please see the course exhibit under that title for further information. **NOTE: An earlier version of this course was offered between September 1996 and December 2001. Credit is recommended for individuals who completed the course between those dates if the individual has successfully completed all course examinations administered at any point after January 2002. The individual's transcript should indicate that eligibility to apply for college credit is based on this arrangement, should document the original dates of training, and should document the date that testing occurred after January 2002. NOTE: This course and Battalion Chiefs Command Course (MNG 400) are essentially the same course evaluated by two different agencies. Both exhibits have been retained to minimize confusion.

Length:

Version 1 and 2: 16 hours.

Dates:

Version 1: January 2010 - October 2010. Version 2: November 2010 - June 2015.

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Students will apply law and code regulations in conducting inspections; students will develop and coordinate an effective plan ensuring compliance with codes and procedures; students will properly document inspections digitally; students will demonstrate competency by enforcing the proper preparation of summons, violation and notice of violation orders; students will utilize resources to research permits, ownership, and building profiles; students will navigate the complex legal landscape surrounding building inspections.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2:This course consists of 14 hours of lecture and 4 hours of competency training and scenario based learning. It consists of a final exam and field tests/skills competencies.

Credit recommendation:
Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Building Construction, Safety, or Fire Services Administration; Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Building Construction, Safety, or Fire Services Administration (7/10 revalidation).
Length:

Version 1 or 2: 24 Hours (3 Days).

Dates:

Version 1: January 2002 - August 2007.  Version 2: September 2007 - July 2015.  

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: design, order, install, and maintain a communications system during an incident and acquire the knowledge and skills of a Communications Unit Leader for a large-scale incident. Version 2: Students will be able to: arrive at the incident properly equipped, gathering information to assess the situation, and begin initial planning activities of a communications unit leader; plan, staff, manage, and demobilize the communications unit in a safe and effective manner to meet the needs of the incident; coordinate with communications personnel to assist in accomplishing the overall objectives of the communications unit; design, order, install, and maintain operations, logistics, and air operations communications systems to support the incident; and maintain accountability of assigned communications equipment.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Major topics covered in the course are assembling a communications unit leader kit, establishing the communications unit, designing and ordering the communications system, installing and maintaining the communications system, communications equipment and technology, assignment and accountability, locating and managing the operations of the incident communications center, internal and external coordination, and demobilization.

Credit recommendation:
Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Fire science, Emergency Management, Homeland Security, EMS Management, Criminal Justice Administration, or Public Administration (5/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education).  Version 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Fire Science, Emergency Management, Homeland Security, Emergency Medical Services Management, Criminal Justice Administration, Engineering Technology, Communications, or Public Administration (10/08 revalidation) (7/10 revalidation).
Length:

32 hours (4 weeks). 

Dates:

April 1996 - December 2001. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: access and utilize application programs in the Windows environment; modity Windows environment settings; use Windows accessory programs; use word processing software to create, format, edit, and print business documents; use advanced word processing functions including columns and tables, letterhead templates, and sorting; produce fire, emergency, and fire prevention reports using a database management program. 

Instruction:

Major topics include: Windows overview, setting the Windows environment, Windows accessories and multitasking, word processing basics, including editing and formatting techniques, grammar and spell checking, advanced editing tools, columns and tables, letterhead templates, sorting in word processing, entering data and printing reports in a customized database management application. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Office Technology or Office Automation Systems (12/96). 

Length:

Version 1 and 2: 16 hours (2 days).

Dates:
Version 1: March 1990 - December 1999. Version 2: January 2000 - May 2005.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Provide basic life support in cardiac and respiratory emergencies.

Instruction:
Version 1: Emergency cardiac care; cardiovascular and respiratory systems; risk factors and prudent heart living; one and two rescuer CPR; airway management; special resuscitation situations; pediatric basic life support; ethical and legal considerations; safety. Version 2: All topics included in Version 1; in addition, introduction to public access defibrillation programs.
Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Health Science or Physical Education (5/95) (5/00 revalidation).

Length:

12 hours (1.5 days). 

Dates:

May 2002 - August 2007. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define the cause and prevention of stress; identify how to detect and deal with it; and demonstrate competency in accident management and rescue skills. 

Instruction:

Major topics include: trench operations learning, con-ed vacuum truck demonstration, skills station assemble, trench panels, set panels in trench simulator, gin pole air bag rigging, t-shaped trench, and panel placement simulator. 

Credit recommendation:

In the vocational certificate or lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Physical Education (5/04 - review conducted by the American Council on Education). 

Length:

22.5 hours (1 week).

Dates:

September 2014 - March 2016.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: effectively respond to and manage a Mass Casualty Incident as part of the command structure; identify and describe roles and responsibilities of the various key positions under the ICS Command structure; review effective radio communication strategies while also familiarizing new terminologies and techniques within the ICS; collaborate and cooperate with the Incident Commanders while ensuring the safety and well being of the EMS units under her/her command; define the role of Fire Chief Officers and how they can assist in acquiring resources needed for the Medical Branch; and apply communication strategies and tactics learned during classroom and tabletop exercises.

Instruction:

This course focuses on reviewing strategies and tactics needed to successfully manage the Medical Branch of any Multiple Casualty Incident. This joint training initiative gives EMS Officers and Fire Officers the opportunity to interact and learn each other’s roles and responsibilities at Multiple Casualty Incidents through classroom lectures, tabletop exercises, and radio communication drills as well as easel workgroups. Prerequisite: Emergency Medical Service Officer.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Emergency Management/Leadership, Fire Service Administration, Emergency Medical Services, or Incident Command (6/15).

Length:

41 hours (1 week). 

Dates:

October 2010 - January 2020. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: list the foundational leadership principles and outline the theory; demonstrate an ability to advance principles and theory by altering and transforming them in training scenarios in order to lead more effectively in high-risk and high-stress environments. Students defend decisions and actions rendered and predict how the principles and theory could be used in potential real-world events. 

Instruction:

This course focuses on the development of leadership skills through the study and understanding of the principles and techniques available for building and leading cohesive, adaptive, and resilient teams. Major topics include: interpersonal communications, establishing objectives, developing mission and vision statements, problem solving, ethics, managing stress, Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, after-action reviews, Swiss Cheese Models of Human Error, Memory (cognitive, emotion systems). Instruction is provided via simulations and hands-on exercises. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 1 semester hour in Management or Leadership (6/15). 

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