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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Retired Learning Experiences - Study.com

Organization

Credit Course Categories:

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in Retired Learning Experiences - Study.com

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

55 hours (11 weeks).

Dates:

April 2012 – April 2022.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: differentiate the components and purposes of various costing methods, techniques, and formulas including cost accounting, job-order costing systems, process costing, and variable and activity-based costing; use cost accounting formulas, such as those used to calculate the break-even point, target net income, gross profit margin, and contribution margin; assess how different industries use activity-based costing methods to determine the costs of various products or services; breakdown the purpose and components of the master budget; dissect the process of CVP analysis to determine the relationship between company costs, revenue and sales volume; summarize effective techniques for estimations and planning, such as using employ regression analysis to achieve project cost goals; analyze various aspects of cost accounting in inventory, such as inventory accounts, goods and inventory statements, and methods of inventory cost calculations; and evaluate modern trends in managerial accounting and their effects on business strategy, such as how and why predictive accounting has risen in popularity.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: cost classifications in accounting; costing methods and techniques; formulas for cost accounting; standard costs in accounting; job order cost system in accounting; activity-based costing overview; product and service costing; budgetary process; cost behavior analysis; cost-volume-profit analysis overview; cost estimation; service department and joint cost allocation; cost accounting for decision making; ethics in cost accounting; and modern trends in accounting.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Cost Accounting or Business (4/17).

Length:

40 hours (10 weeks).

Dates:

December 2012 - April 2022.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:compare and contrast the nucleic acids DNA and RNA; differentiate the parts of cells and explain cell biology; understand genetics and the principles of heredity; describe and analyze metabolic biochemistry; classify organisms to demonstrate a fundamental understanding of taxonomy; analyze how the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, musculo-skeletal, nervous and immune systems work; demonstrate how ecosystems form and evolve; illustrate the theory and principles of evolution; and explain the history of life on Earth.

Instruction:

Course materials are presented via audio visual materials. Major topics include: science basics; inorganic chemistry review for biology; organic chemistry introduction; nucleic acids of DNA and RNA; enzymatic biochemistry; cell membranes; cell structure and organelles; DNA replication's processes and steps; transcription and translation processes; genetic mutations; metabolic biochemistry; cell division; the muscular skeletal, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and excretory systems; the nervous and endocrine systems; reproduction and development in animals; and genetics and principles of heredity; ecological principles; principles of evolution; earth's timeline and evolution; phylogeny and organism classification; and molecular biology lab techniques.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate  degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology, Natural Sciences, or as a general education requirement (12/16).

Length:

25 hours (6 weeks).

Dates:

December 2011 - April 2022.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze DNA and RNA replication, types and structure, prokaryotic transcription, eukaryotic transcription, the genetic code, and protein synthesis; examine the basic principles of genetics, properties of alleles, Mendel's laws, complementation tests, exceptions to simple dominance, polygenic traits, epistasis, and heredity; compare and contrast invertebrate and vertebrate model organisms, the pattern formation in the basic body plan, and the different types of genes; analyze the theory of evolution, the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium, natural selection, inbreeding, genetic fitness, and speciation; summarize what causes mutations, including mutagens, irradiation, and DNA base excision repair; breakdown human genetics research, including pedigrees, population genetics, genetic disorders, sex chromosomes, and genetic testing; review topics related to comparative genomics, such as homology, prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and chromosomes; and relate the polymerase chain reaction, cloning, genetic modification, and the Human Genome Project.

Instruction:

Methods of instruction include audio visual materials and classroom exercises. Major topics include: the molecular and chromosomal basics of inheritance; transmission/Mendelian Genetics; population genetics and evolution; model organisms and developmental genetics; DNA damage, mutation, and repair; human genetics; DNA technology and transgenic organisms.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaurate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology, Natural Science, or as a general education requirement (12/16). 

Length:

30 hours (12 weeks). 

Dates:

December 2013 - April 2022. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: analyze the structure, function, physiology and metabolism of bacteria and viruses; differentiate between bacterial infection, viral infection and disease; categorize the types of viruses and explain how they replicate; analyze diseases caused by DNA viruses, RNA viruses and protozoa; identify and define food-borne illnesses and bacterial infections of the gastrointestinal tract; outline the causes and symptoms of sexually transmitted bacterial diseases; identify the types of bacterial skin, wound and respiratory infections; and apply basic immunology to model the body's defenses against pathogens.

Instruction:

Course materials are presented via audio visual materials. Major topics include: microbiology basics; biology of bacteria; the disease process; introduction to viruses; DNA viruses; RNA viruses; diseases caused by protozoa; fungal infections; foodborne diseases and bacterial infections of the gastrointestinal tract; sexually transmitted bacterial diseases; blood-borne bacterial diseases; bacterial diseases of the respiratory tract; bacterial wound and skin infections; principles of immunology; and antimicrobial drugs.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or Science (12/16). 

Length:

36 hours (6 weeks).  

Dates:

December 2012 - April 2022.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to;illustrate the structure and explain the function of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems; categorize the organs of the digestive system and explain their role in digestion; illustrate the urinary system and how the body is detoxified; diagram the structure and explain the function and common disorders of the endocrine system; analyze the structure and function of the brain and nervous system; summarize the senses and how they function; outline and model the muscular system, including muscle cells, tissues, contraction, and gross anatomy; differentiate the bones in the human body and describe the function of the skeletal system; and define the anatomy and physiology of the male and female reproductive systems.

Instruction:

Major topics include an overview of anatomy and cell biology; human respiratory system; cardiovascular system; blood vessels; digestive system; urinary system; endocrine system; the brain; the nervous system at the cellular level; the five senses; muscle physiology; gross anatomy of muscular system; connective tissue; skeletal system; and male and female reproductive systems.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or Science (12/16). 

Length:

30 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

December 2013 - April 2022.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:explain cellular injury, cellular adaptation, neoplasia, the types of growth it can cause, what causes cancer and causes of a decrease in number and size of cells; categorize the causes of inflammation, autoimmune responses, acute and chronic inflammation, and inflammation's impact on the entire body; discuss the structure and function of human skin, physical causes of skin inflammation and inflammatory disorders; paraphrase the nervous system's functions, diseases that affect the nervous system and pain types; compare and contrast the various types and causes of cardiovascular and blood disorders, conditions, and diseases; explain how carbon dioxide is transported in the blood, diseases and conditions of the lungs, and how the lungs affect the heart; summarize the structure of the kidney, diseases and conditions that affect the kidney, and the roles that sodium, chloride and potassium play in human bodies; examine the diseases and conditions that affect the stomach, small intestine, gall bladder and pancreas; identify the disorders and diseases of bone tissues and joints, including myopathy, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and of the human reproductive system; and appraise the normal range of values for electrolytes and glucose in the blood and urine, and understand the importance of various clinical tests.

Instruction:

Major topics include: pathophysiology components; inflammation causes and treatment; pathophysiology of cancer and neoplasia; skin disorders and pathophysiology; nervous system injuries and traumas; major nervous system disorders; congenital heart and cardiovascular defects; developed cardiovascular abnormalities; respiratory system pathologies; urinary system diseases; gastrointestinal system conditions; diabetes and metabolic derangements; anemia causes, types, and classification; hematological conditions and pathologies; blood cancers; musculoskeletal system disorders and diseases; disorders of the reproductive system; and clinical tests for electrolyte levels.

Credit recommendation:

In the associate/certificate degree category, 3 semester hours in Biology or Science (12/16). 

Length:

50 hours (12 weeks). 

Dates:

October 2013– April 2022.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: analyze the nature of business and entrepreneurship; evaluate how the economy, law, technology, competition, and society impact businesses and the global market; differentiate the forms and types of business ownership; summarize organizational management in terms of management and leadership levels, skills and roles; assess the importance of employee motivation and performance reviews; break down the cycle of business production and sales; investigate risk management through learning about ways to manage it and insurance coverage options; describe the role of money in business, including accounting, securities, and financial institutions; analyze the nature of business and entrepreneurship; evaluate how the economy, law, technology, competition, and society impact businesses and the global market; differentiate the forms and types of business ownership; summarize organizational management in terms of management and leadership levels, skills and roles; assess the importance of employee motivation and performance reviews; break down the cycle of business production and sales; investigate risk management through learning about ways to manage it and insurance coverage options; describe the role of money in business, including accounting, securities, and financial institutions.

Instruction:

The course is self-paced. Instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: the dynamic business environment, practicing social responsibility and ethical behavior in business, economics and business, business in global markets, forms of business ownership, entrepreneurship and small business, managing and leading in business, leadership styles in business, organizational management, business production and operations, workplace productivity and motivation, basics of human resources, managing the employer-worker relationship, business marketing basics, product development and retailing, product distribution and supply chain management, pricing strategy in marketing, product promotion in business, MIS basics in business, implications of information technology, risk management in business, accounting basics, financial management in business, securities markets and business, and money and financial institutions.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business or Business Administration (10/16).

Length:

40 hours (15 weeks). 

Dates:

October 2013 – April 2022.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: investigate how American law began, the Constitution, Bill of Rights, and the branches of government; compare and contrast the legal systems in the U.S., court functions, civil versus criminal law, substantive law versus procedural law and what happens when a lawsuit begins; outline the basics and capacity of contracts including termination, types, contracts and issues with minors, third-part beneficiaries, and assignment and delegation of rights and duties; examine the Statute of Frauds; explain certainty of terms, rules of interpretation and construction, implied terms, the parole evidence rule, conditions and excused conditions; paraphrase types of breaches, anticipatory repudiation, remedies for breaches of contracts, defenses to enforcement of a contract, how a contract can be discharged and concepts related to torts; examine topics that include legal ethics, securities and antitrust law, trademarks, patents, copyrights and trade secrets; differentiate the rights of creditors, product liability, consumer and credit protection, privacy protection, and unfair competition; hypothesize how to create the agency relationship and liability of the principal and liability of the agent; and analyze how to create a partnership and corporation, the Uniform Commercial code, tax structure, and liability of corporations. 

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: History of American Law; Sources of Law; Constitutional Law; American Legal Systems; Legal Procedures; Contract Law Basics; Capacity in Contract Law; Contract Law and Third Party Beneficiaries; Contracts: Assignment and Delegation; Contracts: Statute of Frauds; Contracts: Scopes and Meanings; Contracts: Breach of Contract; Contracts: Discharge of Contracts; The Legal Environment; Securities and Antitrust Law; Property Law; Creditors’ Rights; Product Liability and Consumer Protection; Torts in Business Law; The Role of Agency in Business Law; Sales & the Law.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Resources Management, Introduction to Business Law or Management (10/16).

Length:

24 hours (12 weeks).

Dates:

December 2012 - April 2022.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define and outline the components of an information system; diagram and describe the hardware components of a computer system; identify and appraise common systems and application software, including operating systems; summarize how the Internet, Intranet, and Extranet work, and differentiate between them; categorize and explain the components of a telecommunications system; diagram and explain decision support systems and other specialized information systems; describe the process of software development and management tools used in the software development process; break down why information systems use the database approach to data management; evaluate the impact of information technology on society and privacy; and summarize the basics of programming and steps in the programming process.

Instruction:

Major topics include: information systems in organizations; hardware and systems technology; systems software and application software; Internet, Intranet, and Extranet; network systems technology; enterprise business systems; decision support systems; specialized information systems; systems development; data management; business, social, and ethical issues; and programming.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business, Information Systems, or Information Technology (12/16). 

Length:

24 hours (8 weeks). 

Dates:

October 2013 – April 2022.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: understand the basics of industrial labor and relations in the United States; explore the history and local, state, and national structure of unions and organized labor, including their organization and management strategies; recognize the regulation and deregulation in labor laws in the United States; list the theories and models behind union development and process certification and decertification; identify and describe collective bargaining; explore the concepts of contract administration and labor arbitration from a corporate perspective; and discover the differences in union formation and bargaining around the world. 

Instruction:

The course is self-paced, and instruction is delivered through online video and text lessons. Students are assessed through quizzes and a proctored final exam. Topics include: The Industrial Relations System; Union Structure, Organization and Management; American Labor History; American Labor Law in the Private Sector Before 1960; American Labor Law in the Private Sector After 1960; The Organizing Process; Collective Bargaining; Contract Administration; Labor Arbitration; The Public Sector; International Labor Relations.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Human Resources Management or Labor Relations (10/16).

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