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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Retired Learning Experiences - Corporate College Services, Inc.

Organization

Credit Course Categories:

Titles of all evaluated learning experiences in Retired Learning Experiences - Corporate College Services, Inc.

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

32 hours (8 weeks).

Dates:

July 2010 - March 2015.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: gain greater confidence in their ability to think philosophically; practice reading and analyzing philosophical writings; experience listening to and contributing to philosophical discussion; propose some central questions in philosophy; evaluate the ideas of selected philosophers who are historically important; and further define and develop philosophical beliefs.
Instruction:
This course helps students pursue knowledge in two arenas of philosophy: understanding of the classic problems of philosophy and the actual conduct of doing philosophy. Major topics covered in the course are: the philosophical enterprise; logic, clear thinking, and fallacies; the mind-body problem; free will and determinism; the problem of personal identity; the problem of relativism and morality; the problem of evil and the existence of god; the problem of skepticism and knowledge; practical/personal/business uses of philosophy; caring, conversation, counseling and cafes; and modern Socratic dialogue.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Introduction to Western Philosophy (3/10). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Length:
28 hours (7 weeks).
Dates:

July 2010 - March 2015.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: develop measurement and food evaluation techniques; identify unique chemical and physical characteristics of particles that make up food, particularly water; explore human responses to food; evaluate the chemical structure and nutritional impact of macronutrients (such as sugar, complex carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes); identify the role of microcomponents (such as vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals) on food quality; and develop higher order thinking processes through gathering and processing scientific information about food handling and safety.
Instruction:
This course helps students develop an understanding of the chemical, physical, and biological concepts that govern the way food and our bodies behave and interact. Major topics covered are: evaluation of food quality; regulations governing food supply and labeling; study of carbohydrates, proteins, enzymes, fats and oils; study of water, pectins, gums, emulsions and food additives; food safety; packaging, food preservation and processing; and food preservation.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Principles of Food Science (3/10). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

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