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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Retired Learning Experiences - Corporate College Services, Inc.

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:

July 2010 - December 2021.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply accounting processes, principles, and practices; interpret financial statements; estimate account balances and costs of investments; evaluate the effects of generally accepted accounting principles as they pertain to business practices; recognize and support controls, including Sarbanes-Oxley; and discriminate among various types of accounting practices in different businesses; and employ internal controls.

Instruction:
Major topics include: GAAP and the role of accounting in business; business transactions and accounting equation; financial statements; types of accounts and transactions; analyzing and summarizing transactions in accounts; trial balance; closing and reversing entries; the Accounting Cycle; accounting for merchandising businesses and accounting systems, Sarbanes-Oxley; internal controls and cash; receivables and inventories; fixed assets and current liabilities.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Financial Accounting (6/10) (12/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learner outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:

July 2010 - December 2021.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: assess the effects of  GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) on business practices; present budgets and assess compliance; allocate costs and assess project outcomes; evaluate cost accounting methods; and apply accounting practices and principles to managerial decision-making.

Instruction:

Major topics include: statement of cash flows; investments in bonds; financial statement analysis; job order cost system; process cost system; cost behavior and cost-volume-profit analysis; profit reporting for management analysis; budgeting; evaluation using variances from standard costs; cost allocating and activity-based costing; differential analysis and product pricing; and capital investment analysis. Prerequisite: Accounting I (ACC 201) or equivalent. 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Financial Accounting (6/10) (12/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:

July 2010 - December 2021.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: solve equations and inequalities with 1 and 2 variables; apply trigonometric functions and laws; perform operations with rational expressions, functions, exponents, and roots; solve problems using exponential and logarithmic functions; correctly manipulate a calculator; and apply critical thinking and problem solving skills in analyzing information.
Instruction:
Major topics include: algebraic expressions, equations and inequalities, relations and functions, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, and uses of trigonometry. Methods of instruction include lecture, drill, class discussions, question and answer, exercises, and self-exploration, and group work.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Algebra with Trigonometry (6/10) (12/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:

July 2010 - December 2021.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: critique various legal documents germane to personal and business transactions; analyze problems objectively, legally, and logically; utilize legal terms found in business situations; and decide when legal counsel is warranted in certain work scenarios.
Instruction:

Major topics include: foundations of law; competent parties; the United States Court System; transfer of contract rights and obligations; public and private wrongs; termination of contracts; sales contracts; litigation; product liability; contract law; commercial paper; agreements; negotiable instruments; agency employment and labor law; and business organizations and regulations.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Law (6/10) (12/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:

July 2010 - December 2021.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: perform operations with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals; apply equations in problem solving; calculate simple and compound interest; analyze taxes, mortgages, annuities, and credit; compute inventory and depreciation; and evaluate financial statements and ratios.
Instruction:

Major topics include: whole numbers, fractions, and decimals; solving equations; percents; discounts, markups and markdowns; payroll; simple interest and notes; compound interest; annuities; consumer and business credit; mortgages; financial statements; inventory; depreciation; investments; business statistics; and data presentation.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Business Math (6/10) (9/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Length:
32 hours (8 weeks).
Dates:

July 2010 - December 2021.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: describe a set of data; compute measures of central tendency and variation; apply probability concepts to hypothesis testing; draw conclusions about populations based on samples; and analyze relationships between two variables; and create predictions from data.
Instruction:
Major topics include: presenting data in tables and charts; summarizing and describing numerical data; simple linear regression and correlation; probability; normal distribution and sampling distributions; correlation and regression; hypothesis testing.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree, 3 semester hours in Business Statistics (6/10) (6/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Length:
28 hours - 7 weeks (BUS 302) or 4 weeks (BUS 302R).
Dates:

July 2010 - December 2021.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: assess the dynamics of the business writing environment; develop a concise, individual business writing style; apply the essential aspects of good business prose; evaluate strong and weak characteristics in business writing; and evaluate how these components function in a group writing project.
Instruction:
Major topics include: composition, effective business writing, business prose, business memos, letters and proposals, and researching and writing business reports.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate category, 3 semester hours in Business Writing (3/10) (3/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Length:
28 hours (7 weeks).
Dates:

January 2009 - December 2021.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: assess the eating patterns and dietary needs for people of different ages and for differing groups within society; identify nutrition and health problems associated with diet; identify the socio-economic factors related to diet; critically assess current nutrition fads and controversies; analyze various nutrient requirements and how these are translated to daily intake recommendations of nutrients and foods; and effectively manage family members' diets in relation to their needs and lifestyles.
Instruction:

This course focuses on content analysis and synthesis of particular aspects of the science of nutrition and its applications in real life. Through examination and enhancement of these concepts, students employ new attitudes and behaviors concerning their own perspective of nutrition for themselves, their families, and society as a whole. Major topics are: guidelines for designing a healthy diet; a nutrition perspective on the human body; energy balance and weight control; carbohydrates; fitness and sports nutrition; lipids; proteins; vitamins; minerals; global impacts; safety of food and water; under nutrition around the world; eating disorders; pregnancy and breastfeeding; nutrition from infancy through adolescence; and nutrition during adulthood.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Science (3/10) (6/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Length:
28 hours (7 weeks).
Dates:

July 2010 - December 2021.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to:demonstrate the power of the written word; demonstrate that writing successfully is a process that starts with thinking and ends with revising; apply the components of rhetoric and uphold the writer's challenge to control them; equate the connection between logical thinking and effective persuasive writing; analyze logical fallacies in their own thinking and the thinking of others; and identify the use, misuse and abuse of secondary source material.
Instruction:
Major topics include: expository writing, the writing process, components of rhetoric, and critiquing student and published papers.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English Composition I (3/10) (9/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

Length:
28 hours (7 weeks).
Dates:

July 2010 - December 2021.

Objectives:
Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: develop an individual style of writing, identify a researchable topic, use a library and the Internet to gather material, evaluate the material, and synthesize findings in a well-written, well-argued paper; apply the APA guidelines for proper documentation of source materials; and define plagiarism and develop strategies on how to avoid plagiarism.
Instruction:
Major topics include: conducting research; using the writing process; writing in all disciplines; using evidence; making an argument; developing an individual style of writing; reading, interpreting, and writing about literature.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English Composition II (3/10) (9/15 revalidation). NOTE: The educational approach in this course is based on the principles of accelerated learning and adult learning theory. Based on this, and due to the limited class size and the low student/teacher ratio, learning outcomes are achieved and content is covered in the allotted hours.

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