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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Retired Courses - Diller-Quaile School of Music

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
The Diller-Quaile School of Music, 24 East 95th Street, New York, NY 10128.
Length:
30 hours (15 weeks).
Dates:

February 2001 - December 2017. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: conceptualize, physically express, and improvise with different measure shapes (showing crusis, anacrusis, and metacrusis); demonstrate familiarity with the concept of "time/space/energy"; understand, physically express, and improvise with music in 9/8, 5/8, and 7/8; understand, physically express, and improvise with 3/4 to 6/8 conversions, including the use of the hemiola; understand, physically express, and improvise with triplets; identify Do-to-do scales in all 7 major scale configurations, and begin to feel comfortable singing them without harmonic support from the piano; work with Do-to-do scales in minor keys, working with the harmonic minor; work with major and minor pentatonics; extrapolate from one's knowledge in Solfege and Eurhythmics in order to analyze pieces of composed music for melody, harmony, and rhythm; analyze and move to basic meters, and standard patterns within those meters.

Instruction:

Instruction follows the tenets of the first semester with Eurhythmics, Solfege, and Improvisation as the basic means to train the mind, body, and ear. In Eurhythmics, participants deal with increasingly complex aspects of rhythm, tempo, and dynamics, as they work in mixed meter and metric conversions. Participants learn to demonstrate canonic and contrapuntal lines both in group activities and in independent challenges, such as stepping one line and clapping another. They are also asked to reflect musical concepts in their own choreography. In Solfege, participants work with minor scales and modes in addition to the major scale. Class exercises require them to listen with sensitivity and sing with good intonation as they manipulate the building blocks of melody, tonality and basic harmony. They also gain experience in writing exercises and pieces that reflect their understanding. Improvisation at the keyboard allows participants to work with the concepts addressed in both Eurhythmics and Solfege. They improvise both in partners and as soloists, gaining skills in listening as well as playing, and finding solutions to the challenges posed by the instructor. Further readings are assigned to provide insight into the Dalcroze approach, and students write short papers on topics that relate what they have learned in class to their own teaching and studying. Participants continue to compile portfolios of their written assignments as well as audio tapes of their improvisation and Solfege homework. Prerequisite:  Eurhythmics, Solfege, Improvisation - Level: Beginner/Intermediate (505A) or by audition.

Credit recommendation:

In the graduate degree category, 2 semester hours in Music, Music Education, or Dalcroze Studies (6/01) (9/06 revalidation) (12/11 revalidation) (12/16 Administrative Review). NOTE: Courses 505A and 505B together constitute a full semester course in Music, Music Education, or Dalcroze Studies.

Location:
The Diller-Quaile School of Music, 24 East 95th Street, New York, NY 10128.
Length:
30 hours (15 weeks).
Dates:

September 2000 - December 2017. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: conceptualize and physically express concepts focusing on pulse levels and their relationship to each other, particularly the concepts of twice as fast, twice as slow; understand and physically express tempo, phrase lengths, and dynamics; understand, notate, physically express, and improvise with basic rhythmic patterns of simple and compound time; understand and improvise with different permutations of 16th and 8th notes; understand, notate, physically express, and improvise with rhythmic durations in 6/8; move in a canon to given music; use syllables in the "fixed do" system; particularly in scale patterns using dichords, trichords, and particularly in the keys of C, F, and A flat Major and a, d, and f minor with comfort and facility; use numbers to show scale degrees with comfort and facility; work in a contrapuntal fashion through canons and "sing/plays"; improvise with coherent phrasing using patterns and strategies developed through Eurhythmics and Solfege work.

Instruction:

A Dalcroze education is a musical training comprising the basic elements of music: rhythm, dynamics, tone and form. The training has three components: Eurhythmics, which trains the body in rhythm and dynamics; Solfege, which trains the ear, eye, and voice in pitch, melody, and harmony; Improvisation, which puts it all together according to the student's own invention in movement, with voice, and at an instrument. Eurhythmics: The study of rhythm, tempo, and dynamics, their functions and their structural value in music; alerting and educating the kinesthetic sense: the body is the instrument; basic rhythmic skills and concepts: duration, dynamics, time/space/energy/weight/balance, musical form and structure; basic techniques and practices: follow, quick reaction, canon, improvisation. Solfege: The training of ear, eye, voice, and mind to achieve musical literacy; intervals, scales, harmony, counterpoint, rhythmic connections, basic techniques and practices. Improvisation: The control and shaping of spontaneous musical thought: basic keyboard geography, sound qualities, expressive potential, basic structural elements, and basic components of musical content and development; basic techniques and practices. Course participants are accomplished musicians, teachers, and movement specialists who want to develop their musical skills and abilities in the Dalcroze approach. Readings are assigned to provide insight into the Dalcroze approach. Course participants compile a portfolio of compositions of scale patterns, canons, and rhythmecized scales and use rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic understanding to improvise scale pieces.

Credit recommendation:

In the graduate degree category, 2 semester hours in Music, Music Education, or Dalcroze Studies (3/01) (9/06 revalidation) (12/11 revalidation) (12/16 Administrative Review). NOTE: Courses 505A and 505B together constitute a full semester course in Music, Music Education, or Dalcroze Studies.

Location:
The Diller-Quaile School of Music, 24 East 95th Street, New York, NY 10128.
Length:
30 hours (15 weeks).
Dates:

September 2014 - December 2017.

Objectives:

Eurhythmics: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: review the fundamentals of rhythm kinesthetically. These fundamentals include: meter, phrasing, tempo, dynamics, pulse levels, and rhythmic patterns; apply kinesthetic awareness to cognitive analysis of rhythm in simple, compound, and mixed meters; relate and apply movement experiences to rhythmic notation in simple, compound, and mixed meters; conduct and move simultaneously with accuracy and fluency; develop cognitive understanding and physical mastery of complex subjects such 6/8-3/4 transformations, hemiola, functions of complementary rhythm, and varieties of measure shape; demonstrate ability to improvise with rhythmic fundamentals; and relate Dalcroze techniques to students' own listening, practicing, performing, and teaching; Solfege: demonstrate ability to sing in and listen for good intonation; demonstrate fluency in singing with fixed do solfege syllables; demonstrate fluency in singing with numbers (identifying degrees of the scale); analyze and become proficient in singing Dalcroze Do-to-do scales in Major keys; develop the ability to improvise vocally; apply solfege skills to sight singing; perform Sing/Plays - playing one line while singing another; demonstrate ability to sing canons in a group, while listening to counterpoint and resultant harmony; compose and, if necessary, revise a canon with at least two different harmonies; relate modes to Do-to-do scales; develop pitch sensitivity, intonation, and expressive singing; enlarge the listening capacity. Improvisation: apply material from Solfege and Eurhythmics experiences to Improvisation at the keyboard, other instruments, and vocally; demonstrate ability to improvise with clear phrasing and form; demonstrate ability to improvise over increasingly complex harmonic structures; demonstrate ability to harmonize melodies, (commensurate with the piano skills of each student, which will differ); demonstrate ability to play in partners, creating coherent work together; demonstrate ability to improvise with modes; demonstrate ability to play for a variety of movements; and evaluate improvisation based on phrasing, repetition, and contrast. 

Instruction:

Instruction follows the tenets of the first semester with Eurhythmics, Solfege, and Improvisation as the basic means to train the mind, body, and ear. In Eurhythmics, participants deal with increasingly complex aspects of rhythm, tempo, and dynamics, as they work in mixed meter and metric conversions. Participants learn to demonstrate canonic and contrapuntal lines both in group activities and in independent challenges, such as stepping one line and clapping another. They are also asked to reflect musical concepts in their own choreography. In Solfege, participants work with minor scales and modes in addition to the major scale. Class exercises require them to listen with sensitivity and sing with good intonation as they manipulate the building blocks of melody, tonality and basic harmony. They also gain experience in writing exercises and pieces that reflect their understanding. Improvisation at the keyboard allows participants to work with the concepts addressed in both Eurhythmics and Solfege. They improvise both in partners and as soloists, gaining skills in listening as well as playing, and finding solutions to the challenges posed by the instructor. Further readings are assigned to provide insight into the Dalcroze approach, and students write short papers on topics that relate what they have learned in class to their own teaching and studying. Participants continue to compile portfolios of their written assignments as well as audio tapes of their improvisation and Solfege homework. (Prerequisite: 505A or by audition.)

Credit recommendation:

In the graduate degree category, 2 semester hours in Music, Music Education, or Dalcroze Studies (8/14 Administrative Review) (12/16 Administrative Review). NOTE: Courses 508A and 508B together constitute a full semester course in Music, Music Education, or Dalcroze Studies.

Location:
The Diller-Quaile School of Music, 24 East 95th Street, New York, NY 10128.
Length:
30 hours (15 weeks).
Dates:

January 2015 - December 2017.

Objectives:

Eurhythmics: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: review the fundamentals of rhythm kinesthetically. These fundamentals include: meter, phrasing, tempo, dynamics, pulse levels, and rhythmic patterns; apply kinesthetic awareness to cognitive analysis of rhythm in simple, compound, and mixed meters; relate and apply movement experiences to rhythmic notation in simple, compound, and mixed meters; conduct and move simultaneously with accuracy and fluency; develop cognitive understanding and physical mastery of complex subjects such 6/8-3/4 transformations, hemiola, functions of complementary rhythm, and varieties of measure shape; demonstrate ability to improvise with rhythmic fundamentals; and relate Dalcroze techniques to students' own listening, practicing, performing, and teaching; Solfege: demonstrate ability to sing in and listen for good intonation; demonstrate fluency in singing with fixed do solfege syllables; demonstrate fluency in singing with numbers (identifying degrees of the scale); analyze and become proficient in singing Dalcroze Do-to-do scales in Major keys; develop the ability to improvise vocally; apply solfege skills to sight singing; perform Sing/Plays - playing one line while singing another; demonstrate ability to sing canons in a group, while listening to counterpoint and resultant harmony; compose and, if necessary, revise a canon with at least two different harmonies; relate modes to Do-to-do scales; develop pitch sensitivity, intonation, and expressive singing; enlarge the listening capacity. Improvisation: Apply material from Solfege and Eurhythmics experiences to Improvisation at the keyboard, other instruments, and vocally; demonstrate ability to improvise with clear phrasing and form; demonstrate ability to improvise over increasingly complex harmonic structures; demonstrate ability to harmonize melodies, (commensurate with the piano skills of each student, which will differ); demonstrate ability to play in partners, creating coherent work together; demonstrate ability to improvise with modes; demonstrate ability to play for a variety of movements; and evaluate improvisation based on phrasing, repetition, and contrast.

Instruction:

Instruction follows the tenets of the first semester with Eurhythmics, Solfege, and Improvisation as the basic means to train the mind, body, and ear. In Eurhythmics, participants deal with increasingly complex aspects of rhythm, tempo, and dynamics, as they work in mixed meter and metric conversions. Participants learn to demonstrate canonic and contrapuntal lines both in group activities and in independent challenges, such as stepping one line and clapping another. They are also asked to reflect musical concepts in their own choreography. In Solfege, participants work with minor scales and modes in addition to the major scale. Class exercises require them to listen with sensitivity and sing with good intonation as they manipulate the building blocks of melody, tonality and basic harmony. Participants also gain experience in writing exercises and pieces that reflect their understanding. Improvisation at the keyboard allows participants to work with the concepts addressed in both Eurhythmics and Solfege. They improvise both in partners and as soloists, gaining skills in listening as well as playing, and finding solutions to the challenges posed by the instructor. Further readings are assigned to provide insight into the Dalcroze approach, and students write short papers on topics that relate what they have learned in class to their own teaching and studying. Participants continue to compile portfolios of their written assignments as well as audio tapes of their improvisation and Solfege homework. Prerequisite: 505B or by audition.

Credit recommendation:

In the graduate degree category, 2 semester hours in Music, Music Education, or Dalcroze Studies (8/14 Administrative Review) (12/16 Administrative Review). NOTE: Courses 508A and 508B together constitute a full semester course in Music, Music Education, or Dalcroze Studies.

Location:
The Diller-Quaile School of Music, 24 East 95th Street, New York, NY 10128.
Length:
45 hours (15 weeks).
Dates:
September 2000 - December 2006.
Objectives:
Eurhythmics: Conceptualize and physically express, with mastery, the basic Dalcroze subjects studied in 505A and 505B: beat, meter, phrase, pattern, subdivision, complementary rhythm, and measure shape; understand and demonstrate physical mastery of more complex instances of these subjects as well as more advanced material with special emphasis on 6/8-3/4 transformations, metric modulation, hemiola, functions of complementary rhythm, twice-as-fast/twice-as-slow, and varieties of measure shape. Solfege: Sing the Dalcroze Do-to-do scales and scale segments: dichord, trichords, tetrachords, pentachords, and chromatic scales with understanding and facility; sing, identify, and notate major and minor scales and modes; demonstrate pitch sensitivity, intonation skills, and expressive singing; demonstrate fluency and skill in vocal in vocal improvisations and compositions; Improvisation: Explore the Solfege subjects studied; play for movement, particularly for the eurhythmics subjects studied; design and execute improvisation plans for solo and duet playing; improvise on the spot with musical coherence; create compositions focusing on a specific task/concept.
Instruction:
A Dalcroze education is a musical training comprising the basic elements of music: rhythm, dynamics, tone and form. The training has three components: Eurhythmics, which trains the body in rhythm and dynamics; Solfege, which trains the ear, eye, and voice in pitch, melody, and harmony; Improvisation, which puts it all together according to the student's own invention in movement, with voice, and at an instrument. Eurhythmics: Rests, syncopation, polyrhythm, unequal beats and measures; coordination of arm beats and stepped patterns; 2 vs. 3, 3 vs. 2; 6/8-3/4 and 6/8-2/4; twice as fast, twice as slow; complementary rhythm, and a more advanced exploration of the basic materials introduced in the first year. Solfege: Compound and inverted intervals; scales: the circle of 5ths, half (7 scales-D flat-G or E flat-A or B flat-E, etc.); Do-to-do scales: 7 Major scales and their relative minors; an introduction to chromatic do-to-do scales (2 relative M/m pairs); modes: Dorian, Mixolydian: relation of modes to do-to-do scales; pentachords: in major, harmonic, and minor; harmony: diatonic circle of 5ths; counterpoint: more complex forms; rhythmic connections with Eurhythmics topics covered in the second year and more advanced exploration of the work of the first year. Improvisation: More advanced work, building on previous training done in the Beginning-Intermediate Level. Particular attention to playing for movement and imagery, and singing the activities of the eurhythmics class. Course participants are accomplished musicians, teachers, and movement specialists who want to develop their musical skills and abilities in the Dalcroze approach. Readings are assigned to provide insight into the Dalcroze approach. Course participants compile a portfolio of compositions of scale patterns, canons, and rhythmecized scales and use rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic understanding to improvise musical pieces.
Credit recommendation:
In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Music, Music Education, or Dalcroze Studies (3/01) (9/06 revalidation).
Location:
The Diller-Quaile School of Music, 24 East 95th Street, New York, NY 10128.
Length:
45 hours (15 weeks).
Dates:
February 2001 - December 2006.
Objectives:
Eurhythmics: Conceptualize and physically express, with mastery, one's knowledge of basic and more advanced Dalcroze subjects, with special emphasis on twice-as-fast/twice-as-slow in a 3-beat meter, syncopation, unequal beats and meters, 5-beat and 9/8 meters, and phrasing. Solfege: Sing with understanding and facility scales and scale segments including chromatic scales; understand and sing with knowledge the tri-tone, including its role in modulation to neighbor keys as well as to more distant keys via the Neapolitan and the augmented 6th; improvise vocally and write vocal compositions. Improvisation: Create improvisations and compositions which demonstrate an understanding of material covered in the course as well as developed and refined piano skills.
Instruction:

A Dalcroze education is a musical training comprising the basic elements of music: rhythm, dynamics, tone and form. The training has three components: Eurhythmics, which trains the body in rhythm and dynamics; Solfege, which trains the ear, eye, and voice in pitch, melody, and harmony; Improvisation, which puts it all together according to the student's own invention in movement, with voice, and at an instrument. Eurhythmics: More demanding examination and performance of the major topics studies in 506A, with special attention to the augmentation and diminution (twice as fast/slow, three times a s fast/slow) in 3-beat and 5-beat meters, as well as 6/8; metric transformation of syncopated patterns to unequal beats and vice versa; metric modulation; polymeter; 3 vs. 4, 4 vs. 3, 2 and 3 vs. 5 and vice versa; canonic polyrhythm. Solfege: Application of the work of 506A to vocal improvisation and composition; expanded study of modes: Phrygian, Lydian; intensive study of the tri-tone - its power and versatility; duet and ensemble vocal improvisation; non-diatonic scales: octatonic, whole tone, invented modes; additional chromatic scales. Improvisation: Playing for Eurhythmics class activities; playing for Solfege exercises; song accompaniment; using imagery; reviewing texts (considering issues of prosody) for original songs, composing the songs. Prerequisite: 506A or by audition.

Credit recommendation:
In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Music, Music Education, or Dalcroze Studies (6/01) (9/06 revalidation).
Location:
The Diller-Quaile School of Music, 24 East 95th Street, New York, NY 10128.
Length:
52.5 hours (15 weeks).
Dates:

September 2000 - December 2017.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the principles and practices of Dalcroze Eurhythmics, a movement-based approach to music education; understand the music-movement connection and the purpose and meaning of a movement-based approach to music education; match the tempo and character of children's basic movements through improvisation with voice, small percussion, and piano; improvise simple piano accompaniments to children's songs.

Instruction:

This course involves the practical application of Dalcroze principles and techniques to the music classroom, from pre-kindergarten to conservatory level. It comprises readings and discussions of the Dalcroze philosophy and observations of master teachers. Course participants observe children's classes given by a certified teacher. Readings are assigned to provide insights into the Dalcroze approach. Students' notes on the assigned readings are integrated into the portfolio of written work, which includes the following: songs and musical examples illustrative of movements and music concepts, a log or personal journal of ideas and thoughts, field notes of observations of the course participants' own classes and classes they observe, a paper with a brief discussion of three Dalcroze subjects including a musical example that illustrates each subject, and a reflective paper on how Dalcroze learning takes place and can be assessed in a eurhythmics class and what standards Dalcroze teachers can use to assess their own teaching. Course participants design exercises and games that help children perceive musical connections and they teach these in children's music classes using Dalcroze techniques. Topics covered include: the music-movement connection; observation of teachers/students in classes; taking field notes; keeping a log or personal journal of ideas and comments; major issues facing classroom teachers, including management; coping strategies available through the Dalcroze approach; the Dalcroze subjects, a multi-faceted approach to music concepts including rhythm, form, articulation, nuances, time/space/energy relationships.

Credit recommendation:

In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Music, Music Education, or Dalcroze Studies (3/01) (9/06 revalidation) (12/11 revalidation) (12/16 Administrative Review).

Location:
The Diller-Quaile School of Music, 24 East 95th Street, New York, NY 10128.
Length:
52.5 hours (15 weeks).
Dates:

February 2001 - December 2017. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: integrate Dalcroze principles in teaching music to children; plan and carry out age-appropriate exercises based on the movement-based approach to music education formulated by Emile Jaques-Dalcroze; and articulate a personal philosophy of music education for children integrating principles based on the Dalcroze approach.

Instruction:

Course participants design, develop and carryout age-appropriate exercises for classes that use the movement-based approach to music education formulated by Emile Jaques-Dalcroze. At least two lessons for children given by participants are videotaped. Participants take notes following their teaching, observe videotapes of their teaching and comment critically, visit eurhythmics classes for children taught by certified Dalcroze teachers, record observations and comment on their observations, complete assigned readings that emphasize critical thinking and the process of qualitative inquiry and self-evaluation, keep notes on readings to integrate into their portfolio, conduct in-depth study of selected Dalcroze subjects, collect songs and other music material that exemplify specific Dalcroze subjects, and write two papers, each with focus on one Dalcroze subject. Students note emerging themes as they gain more information through the study of Dalcroze subjects, their observations and comments on classes taught by themselves and others, notes on assigned readings, commentaries in their personal journals, and triangulate these to form conclusions about what characterizes the Dalcroze approach. Students also review and discuss classes for children from the beginning of the academic year, begin to develop an overview of a year's course of study of music classes for children, plan an appropriate syllabus, and articulate a personal philosophy of music education for children integrating principles based on the Dalcroze approach. Topics covered include: diagnosis and evaluation of student performance in class through observation; self-evaluation by teacher through discussions with peers, with supervisors, and by keeping a personal journal or log; design and delivery of Dalcroze exercises toward a specific music goal. Prerequisite: 507A or by audition.

Credit recommendation:

In the graduate degree category, 3 semester hours in Music, Music Education, or Dalcroze Studies (6/01) (9/06 revalidation) (12/11 revalidation) (12/16 Administrative Review).

Location:
The Diller-Quaile School of Music, 24 East 95th Street, New York, NY 10128.
Length:
30 hours (30 weeks).
Dates:
September 1991 - June 1998.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: teach the basic elements of music in a way that develops the musical instinct in every student and inspires a lifetime of participation in music; hear, recognize, name, and write elements of music: rhythmic design (phrasing), melody, and harmony; use appropriate teaching tools; appreciate the folk music of the world as a rich source for study as well as a basis for classical music; and free the creative instinct and develop a classroom format for teaching creative music.

Instruction:
Topics include: form; rhythmic design and phrasing; melody; harmony; teaching tools: French time names, Solfege, and hand signals; eurhythmics; folk song, lieder, and classical music; creative music; use of educational texts. NOTE: Course participants maintain a log during the substantial creative music component to record sequence of activities, invented games, and their reaction to class activities. They also prepare a written book report, an oral book report, and a series of papers on the application of the course materials to solving specific teaching problems.
Credit recommendation:
In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Music/Music Education (5/93).
Location:
The Diller-Quaile School of Music, 24 East 95th Street, New York, NY 10128.
Length:
15 hours (15 weeks).
Dates:
September 1992 - June 1998.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: engage the beginning student, encourage the intermediate student, and sustain the interest of students over many years stressing musicality, ear-training, and folk and classical repertoire; assist students to develop the ear and physical skill of playing the piano; and achieve professional goals by working with students and their families.

Instruction:
Course participants have at minimum an intermediate level ability to play the piano. Topics include folk and classical repertoire; the language of music (phrasing and rhythmic design, melodic shape, harmonic color); tone production; improvisation and creative music; technique as a means of expression; the teacher/student relationship; studio management: interviews, policy decisions, fees, and performances. NOTE: Course participants maintain weekly logs on their experience teaching one piano student, prepare written assignments reflecting on their experiences taking piano lessons and on their own teacher's pedagogy and style, and make an oral presentation on their evaluation of beginning repertoire books as to level, quality, musicality, and appeal to children/adults. Further, the course instructor visits and observes two private piano lessons and follows each with a conference and critique with the course participant.
Credit recommendation:
In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 1 semester hour in Music/Music Education (5/93).

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