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Retired Courses and Earlier Versions of Current Courses - Arnot Ogden Medical Center School of Nursing

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

(Health Assessment in Nursing)
Location:
Arnot-Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length:
Course 1: 104 hours (13 weeks); includes 52 hours of theory, 17 hours of nursing laboratory experience, and 35 hours of supervised clinical experience. Course 2: 104 hours (13 weeks); includes 52 hours of theory, 12 hours of nursing laboratory experience and 40 hours of supervised clinical experience. Course 3: 135 hours (9 weeks); includes 45 hours of theory, 13 hours of nursing laboratory experience and 77 hours of supervised clinical experience.
Dates:
Course 1: May 1990 - August 1999.* Course 2: May 1990 - August 1999.* Course 3: August 1990 - August 1999.*
Objectives:
Course 1: Identify moral, legal, ethical and professional standards for nursing practice; identify scientific principles underlying selected nursing actions to promote and/or maintain health; differentiate between the components of the nursing process utilized to assist individual client's achievement and/or maintenance of health/wellness; describe the process of effective communication in promoting interaction with individual clients, faculty, peers and nursing teams; recognize teaching and learning principles as they apply to selected client teaching situations; actively participate in the learning process through shared experiences, discussions and group interactions. Course 2: Utilize moral, legal, ethical and professional standards of practice, with guidance, in selected situations; implement selected nursing actions based on scientific principles to promote healthy client response; apply the nursing process with guidance to assist hospitalized individual adult clients to achieve and/or maintain optimum level of health/wellness; employ facilitative communication skills, with guidance, in interacting with individual clients, faculty, peers and nursing teams; utilize teaching actions appropriate to the individual's learning needs to achieve a healthier existence; adapt assertiveness skills in identifying and meeting one's own learning needs. Course 3: Apply moral, legal, ethical, and professional standards in health assessment of selected individual clients; demonstrate assessment skills based on scientific principles in determining an individual's healthy physiological and psychosocial response; utilize assessment skills in individualizing the nursing process to clients at various developmental levels; modify communication skills to the individual client to facilitate the effective implementation of the nursing process; apply teaching concepts and principles appropriate to the individual's developmental level in assisting the individual client to achieve a healthier existence; utilize the problem-solving approach to assess one's own learning needs and to develop a plan of action.
Instruction:
Course 1: Nursing Theory and Concepts: historical, legal, ethical and professional issues; health and illness: individual, family, community; holism; nursing and health care delivery system; homeostasis; Maslow's hierarchy of human needs; stress/adaptation. Nursing Process: assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementing, and evaluating; nutrition in health; teaching learning concepts: the theoretical basis for client teaching; legal aspects of documentation; techniques used to develop a therapeutic relationship; group dynamics; mental health concepts of self and self-esteem. Application of the Nursing Process to the following: therapeutic environment, client safety/comfort, restraints, body mechanics, and asepsis-microbial safety; personal care/hygiene; mobility/immobility; body alignment; movement. Course 2: Major concepts include: concept of crisis; adaptations to acute and chronic illness/disability; anxiety as a common response to stress of illness; culture, ethnicity, spirituality and religious beliefs as factors that affect response in health and illness. Application of nursing process to the following: vital signs measurement; medication administration; pain; sensory alterations; wound care and healing; thermal applications; oxygen administration; gastrointestinal and urinary elimination; and rest and sleep. Course 3: The nurse's application of developmental, family and socio-cultural aspects used in gathering the health history are stressed throughout the course. History taking and physical assessment of the individual throughout the lifespan to include inspection, palpation, auscultation and percussion is addressed. The emphasis is on normal findings and developmental variations; adverse effects of medications, and laboratory data are incorporated. Health promotion and education are seen as vital components in this course. Assessments are also discussed in admission, pre-and post-operative care and in discharging an individual in an acute care setting. Assessment tools, i.e., (DDS), are examined.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours in Basic Nursing. If these courses are combined with Nutrition (120), which is offered as a separate course, 6 semester hours in Basic Nursing are recommended. If these courses are combined with Nutrition (120) and Pharmacology (110), which is also offered separately, 8 semester hours in Basic Nursing are recommended (7/91 revalidation) (7/93 revalidation) (7/97 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 1, 2, and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. *NOTE: Earlier versions of these courses are listed in course groupings with either Nutrition (110) and Pharmacology (120) (September 1979 to March 1985) or Pharmacology (120) (April 1985 to December 1990). Please refer to the course groupings beginning with Nursing (101 and 102) in the 1990 Directory and in the preceding course exhibit for further information. For the most current version of these courses, please refer to the Current Courses subsection for this organization.

(Basic Nursing)
Location:
Length:
Dates:
Course 1: Version 1: April 1985 - August 1987. Version 2: September 1987 - April 1990.* Course 2: Version 1: April 1985 - March 1988. Version 2: April 1988 - July 1990.* Course 3: Version 1: April 1985 - August 1987. Version 2: September 1987 - July 1990.*
Objectives:
Instruction:
Credit recommendation:

Version 1 or 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Basic Nursing. If these courses are combined with Nutrition (120), offered as a separate course, 8 semester hours in Basic Nursing are recommended (6/85 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 1, 2, and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. NOTE: Complete information on this version of the listed courses last appeared in the 1996 edition. *NOTE: An earlier version of these courses, dating from September 1979 to March 1985, is listed in the 1990 Directory; Pharmacology (110) and Nutrition (120) are listed separately. A more recent version, which contains Nursing 101, 102, and 103, follows in the next exhibit. For the most current version of these courses, please refer to the Current Courses subsection for this organization.

(Adult Medical Surgical Nursing)
Location:
Length:
Dates:
Course 1: February 1987 - June 1991.* Course 2: March 1987 - December 1991.* Course 3: September 1987 - March 1992.*
Objectives:
Instruction:
Credit recommendation:
In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 8 semester hours in Adult Medical Surgical Nursing (1/90). NOTE: Courses 1, 2 and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. NOTE: Complete information on this version of the listed courses last appeared in the 1996 edition. *NOTE: The current version of these courses can be found under Current Courses in the preceding section. Further, earlier versions of these courses, dating from March 1981 to January 1987, September 1981 to February 1987, and November 1981 to August 1987 respectively, were listed in a course grouping that included Nursing (303). Please refer to the 1990 Directory for further information. Further, the psychiatric nursing component of Nursing (301) had also been recommended for additional credit in combination with Family Nursing II. Please refer to the Family Nursing II course exhibit in this section for further information.
Location:
Length:
Dates:
July 1987 - June 1991.*
Objectives:
Instruction:
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Maternal Nursing (1/90). *NOTE:An earlier version of this course, dating from September 1980 to June 1987, was grouped with Family Nursing II. Please refer to the 1990 Directory for further information. NOTE: Complete information on this course last appeared in the 1996 edition.

Location:
Length:
Dates:
July 1987 - June 1991.*
Objectives:
Instruction:
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Child Health Nursing. When this course is combined with Nursing (301), 4 additional semester hours are recommended in the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the upper division baccalaureate degree category in Psychiatric Nursing. This is in addition to the 4 credits recommended for Family Nursing II and the 8 credits recommended for the course sequence Nursing (201), Nursing (301), and Nursing (302) (total recommended credit is 16 semester hours) (1/90). *NOTE:An earlier version of this course, dating from September 1980 to June 1987, was grouped with Family Nursing I. Please refer to the 1990 Directory for further information. NOTE: Complete information on this course last appeared in the 1996 edition.

Location:
Length:
Dates:
March 1987 - June 1992.*
Objectives:
Instruction:
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Leadership/Trends and Issues in Nursing (1/90). NOTE: Complete information on this course last appeared in the 1996 edition. *NOTE: The current version of this course is listed in the Current Courses subsection for this organization. An earlier version, dating from March 1982 to February 1987, was listed under the course grouping that begins with Nursing (201). Please refer to the 1990 Directory for further information.

Location:
Arnot-Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length:
Version 1 or 2: 30 hours (9 weeks). Version 3: 30 hours (9 weeks). Version 4: 36 hours (9 weeks).
Dates:
Version 1: April 1985 - March 1988. Version 2: April 1988 - July 1990. Version 3: August 1990 - July 1996. Version 4: August 1996 - August 1999.*
Objectives:
Version 1: To provide the student with principles of basic nutrition with an opportunity to apply these principles to individuals. Version 2: Apply the principles of normal nutrition in selecting personal diet; identify the essential nutrients and describe their role in maintaining normal nutrition throughout life; answer questions, with guidance, concerning normal nutrition and nutritive value of foods; identify factors in a person's socio-economic background which influence food habits; use reliable sources of information and reference materials in the area of food and nutrition; evaluate food misinformation and fad diets. Version 3 or 4: All objectives included in Version 2 above; in addition, discuss various dietary patterns in which religion, culture, and food preference play an important role in food habits; list the local organizations, that would provide nutritional assistance to client; write the essential nutrients and their role in maintaining normal nutrition throughout all various stages of life; determine nutritional assessments and dietary data gathering; name dietary supplements or feedings that would help meet the nutritional needs of the client with nutritional impairment; identify reliable sources of information and reference materials in the area of food and nutrition.
Instruction:
Version 1 or 2: Nutrients, their functions, food sources, and utilization in the body; diet, nutritional assessment, and meal planning for the individual on a basic diet; regional, cultural, and religious food practices. (Prerequisites: Nursing 101 and 102, Chemistry, and Biology.) Version 3 or 4: Nutrients; their actions; interaction and balance in relationship to health and disease; processes by which nutrients are ingested, digested, absorbed, transported, and disposal of their end products during the lifespan; social, economic, cultural implications of food and eating.
Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, 3, and 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Nutrition (6/85 revalidation) (7/91 revalidation) (7/97 revalidation). *NOTE: An earlier version of this course, dating from April 1990 to March 1985, can be found in the 1990 Directory. For the most current version, please refer to the Current Courses subsection for this organization.

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