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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Retired and Earlier Versions of Learning Experiences - Joint Apprentice Training Committee of the Elevator Industry

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Park West High School, 525 West 50th Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Course 1 and 2:  144 hours (36 weeks);  Course 3: 72 hours (18 weeks);  Course 4: 72 hours (18 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: Course 1 and 2: September 1986 - August 1993. Course 3: September 1986 - August 1993. Course 4: September 1986 - August 1993. Version 2: Course 1 and 2: September 1993 - August 2000.* Course 3: September 1993 - August 2000.* Course 4: September 1993 - August 2000.*

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2, Course 1 and 2:  Students will be able to: apply basic math skills to problems and needs of maintenance, repair, and conversion work in the elevator industry; explain basic electrical concepts and apply these concepts to work situations; read electrical circuits and apply this ability to elevator circuitry; use mechanical and electrical measuring devices; describe the functions of the component parts of hydraulic, geared and gearless elevator systems; demonstrate safe work practices. Version 1 and 2, Course 3 and 4: Students will be able to: apply basic math skills to the needs of the elevator industry; explain electrical concepts and their application to the elevator industry; read circuit prints involved in the automatic control devices of elevator systems; troubleshoot problems and conduct safety tests of automatic control devices and their circuits.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2, Course 1 and 2: Topics include: structure of matter; the atom; conductance; electric current; producing and using electricity; magnetism; measuring electrical quantities; resistance; Ohm's Law; series circuits, parallel circuits, and series parallel circuits; circuit failure; measuring devices (steel rule, calipers, micrometers, electrical meters); small tools, their uses and misuses; elevator systems (the machine room, traction machines, hydraulic machines, generators, motors and brakes, the controller, selector, governor, ropes, sheaves and guide rails, stopping and leveling devices, cab equipment, pit equipment); circuit tracing (safety circuits, motors and brakes, directional control, protective devices, stopping circuits, hall buttons, interlocks); safety attitudes and practices. Version 1 and 2, Course 3 and 4: AC/DC machinery (inductance, capacitance, DC generators, field winding, AC generators, inductor motors, AC controls, voltage drop and controls, rectifiers, DC brakes, DC motors, commutators and brushes); automatic controls I (print reading, symbols, reverse phase relays, governors, interlocks, gate contact, rectifiers, safety devices, contacts and coils, clapper relays, AC/DC relays, establishing direction, brakes, AC motors, capacitors in timing circuits, holding and stepping circuits, safety circuits, door control circuits, directional controls, limits, hall relay circuits, leveling, and troubleshooting); automatic controls II (print reading, motor-generator configuration, wye-start and delta-run connections, voltage to DC motor, exciting the generator, reducing applied voltage, emergency stop, the AMAC@ operator, troubleshooting the operator, light circuits, troubleshooting erratic car travel and car failure; troubleshooting problems); code and elevator safety tests; troubleshooting in maintenance work.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, Course 1, 2, 3, and 4: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 10 semester hours in Electromechanical Engineering Technology distributed as follows: 4 semester hours in AC/DC Circuits and 6 semester hours (5 lecture, 1 laboratory) in Advanced Mechanisms. NOTE: A student must successfully complete all four years of the curriculum to benefit from the laboratory credit recommendation in Advanced Mechanisms, or 11 semester hours in Applied Technology distributed as follows: 2 semester hours in Principles of Electrical Technology, 3 semester hours in Electrical Machinery, 3 semester hours in Industrial Controls, 3 semester hours in Concepts of Electrical Safety, and, in addition, 2 semester hours in Mechanical Design for Electronics in Mechanical or Electrical Engineering Technology, or 10 semester hours in Electrical Construction and Maintenance distributed as follows: 2 semester hours in Electrical Theory I, 2 semester hours in Electrical Theory II, 2 semester hours in Electrical Theory III, 2 semester hours in Electrical Theory IV, and 2 semester hours in Electrical Blueprint Reading (6/88). NOTE: With each distribution outlined above, Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4 must be completed to receive credit. NOTE: 4,000 hours (2,000 each year) of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for these courses. Version 2, Course 1, 2, 3, and 4: In the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours as Industrial Electricity (7/93 revalidation) (8/94 revalidation) (9/99 revalidation). NOTE: Courses 1, 2, 3, and 4 must be completed to receive credit. NOTE: 4,000 hours (2,000 each year) of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for these courses. *NOTE: The current version of this sequence, dating from September 2000, appears in the retired  section.

Location:
Park West High School, 525 West 50th Street, New York, NY.
Length:
144 hours (36 weeks).
Dates:
September 1993 - August 2000.*
Objectives:

Students will be able to: analyze basic AC and DC circuits; apply fundamental laws to series, parallel and RC circuits; explain behavior of coils and transformers using arithmetic, not vector, solutions; discuss and explain the uses of Zener and conventional diodes, transistors, SCR's, diacs and triacs; explain basic behavior and application of op-amps; discuss fundamentals of binary numbers, TTL logic and CMOS technology; and discuss the application of motor generation and field regulation to elevator systems.

Instruction:

Topics include: Ohm's law, series and series parallel circuits, scientific notation, capacitance and inductance, diodes, transistors, SCR's triacs, op-amps, TTL logic devices, hall effect sensors, motor-generation and field regulation. Lab exercises support lecture materials.

Credit recommendation:
In the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours as Basic Electrical Circuits (8/94) (9/99 revalidation). *NOTE: The current version of this course, dating from September 2000, appears in the preceding section.
Location:
Park West High School, 525 West 50th Street, New York, NY.
Length:
144 hours (36 weeks).
Dates:
Version 1: February 1988 - August 1993.* Version 2: September 1993 - August 2000.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Students will be able to: demonstrate application of basic electrical concepts; construct appropriate digital or control projects; and wire and test industrial control circuits using silicon controlled rectifiers (SCR's) and op-amps.

Instruction:

Version 1: Topics include: review of basic electricity; linear and non-linear components and solid state devices; voltage; current; resistance; magnetism; series dropping resistors; voltage dividers; potentiometers; variable resistors and rheostats; capacitors; diodes; rectifiers; silicon controlled rectifiers; transistors; logic gates; integrated circuits; hoists motors, motor generator sets (DC/DC and AC/DC) and tach generators; analog and digital signals; coils and transformers; lamps and light emitting diodes; logic gates; TTL logic; timers; operational amplifiers; the Hall effect; power supplies; flip flops; counters; counting systems; motor speed control; digital to analog circuits; soldering; safety circuit development; thermistors. Laboratory sessions cover estimating parallel resistances, voltage dividers, transistors, logic gates, TTL logic, timers, silicon controlled rectifiers, Hall effect, counters, and motor speed control. Version 2: Topics include: review of basic electricity; linear and non-linear components and solid state devices; voltage; current; resistance; magnetism; series dropping resistors; voltage dividers; potentiometers; variable resistors and rheostats; capacitors; diodes; rectifiers; silicon controlled rectifiers; transistors; logic gates; integrated circuits; lamps and light emitting diodes; logic gates; TTL logic; timers; operational amplifiers; the Hall effect; power supplies; flip flops; counters; counting systems; motor speed control; digital to analog circuits; soldering; safety circuit development; thermistors. Laboratory sessions cover primarily lay-out and construction of a logic probe using two op-amps or other similar project.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 4 semester hours (3 lecture, 1 laboratory) as Digital Controls or Digital Computers and 4 semester hours (3 lecture, 1 laboratory) as Industrial Electronics and 1 semester hour as a laboratory in Tool Skills or Computer Projects in Electromechanical Engineering Technology or Electrical Construction and Maintenance (6/88). NOTE: 1,000 hours of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for this course. Version 2: In the associate degree/certificate category, 1 semester hour as a laboratory in Electronic Fabrication and 3 semester hours in Industrial Electronics (7/93 revalidation) (8/94 revalidation) (9/99 revalidation). *NOTE: The current version of this course, dating from September 2000, appears in the preceding section.

Location:
Park West High School, 525 West 50th Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 72 hours (18 weeks).

Dates:
Version 1: September 1989 - August 1993.* Version 2: September 1993 - August 2000.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Students will be able to describe the steps involved in the installation of a complete elevator system and upgrade elevator systems to modern installations using current design specifications.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Topics include: upgrading elevator systems to electronic and computer control; rail and buffer supports; rail installation; slings, platform, and safeties; completing the basic installation; setting geared machines; setting gearless machines; roping; hoistway conduit, ducts, and hall fixtures; cabs, limit switches, and music box; GAL door operator; wires; traveling cables; compensation, oil buffers, and balance; preparation for inspection and testing. Shop exercises include: rails and buffer supports; slings, platforms, and safeties; troubleshooting; counterweight frames, initial wiring, and roller guides; setting machines and related equipment; roping; boxes, conduit, and ducts; cab, limits, music box and GAL door operators; wiring; compensation; buffers and balance; preparing for inspection and testing.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the associate in occupational studies degree category, 3 semester hours (2 lecture, 1 shop) in Elevator Conversion/Modernization in Applied Technology (6/88). NOTE: 1,000 hours of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for this course. Version 2: In the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours in Elevator Conversion/Modernization in Applied Technology (7/93 revalidation) (8/94 revalidation) (9/99 revalidation). NOTE: 1,000 hours of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for this course. NOTE: If this course and either The Essentials of Elevator Repair I or The Essentials of Elevator Maintenance I are successfully completed, an additional 1 semester hour of credit is recommended as a shop in Applied Technology. A total of 7 semester hours would be recommended for a combination of any two courses. *NOTE: The current version of this course, dating from September 2000, appears in the preceding section.

Location:
Park West High School, 525 West 50th Street, New York, NY.
Length:
144 hours (36 weeks).
Dates:
September 1993 - August 2000.*
Objectives:

Students will be able to describe the steps involved in the installation of a complete elevator system and upgrade elevator systems to modern installations using current design specifications.

Instruction:

Topics include: upgrading elevator systems to electronic and computer control; rail and buffer supports; rail installation; slings, platform, and safeties; completing the basic installation; setting geared machines; setting gearless machines; roping; hoistway conduit, ducts, and hall fixtures; cabs, limit switches, and music box; GAL door operator; wires; traveling cables; compensation, oil buffers, and balance; preparation for inspection and testing. Shop exercises include: rails and buffer supports; slings, platforms, and safeties; troubleshooting; counterweight frames, initial wiring, and roller guides; setting machines and related equipment; roping; boxes, conduit, and ducts; cab, limits, music box and GAL door operators; wiring; compensation; buffers and balance; preparing for inspection and testing.

Credit recommendation:
In the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours (2 lecture, 1 shop) in Elevator Conversion/Modernization in Applied Technology (8/94) (9/99 revalidation). NOTE: 1,000 hours of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for this course. *NOTE: The current version of this course, dating from September 2000, appears in the preceding section.
Location:
Park West High School, 525 West 50th Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 72 hours (18 weeks).

Dates:
Version 1: September 1986 - August 1993.* Version 2: September 1993 - August 2000.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Students will be able to explain the concept of preventive maintenance; describe procedures required for the service, maintenance, and replacement of the component elements of elevator systems and perform proper maintenance and parts replacement of elevator systems.

Instruction:

Version 1 or 2: Topics include: equipment (sheaves, buffers, limits); shaft equipment (rails, cables, deflector sheaves, door equipment, interlocks, safeties, shoes/roller guides, wiring); leveling switches (magnets, operation, checks); motor room equipment (controller, governor, motor, generator); cab equipment (operator and gate switch, clutch, safety edge, electric eye); hall equipment (position indicators, push buttons, lights); customer and public expectations. Shop exercises include safety procedures, fuses, door operators, identification of worn or damaged parts, brushes, contacts, meters and test lights, lubrication, tracing commons, troubleshooting using prints, and cables.

Credit recommendation:
Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category or in the associate in occupational studies degree category, 3 semester hours (2 lecture, 1 shop) in Elevator Maintenance in Applied Technology (6/88). NOTE: 1,000 hours of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for this course. Version 2: In the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours as Elevator Maintenance in Applied Technology (7/93 revalidation) (8/94 revalidation) (9/99 revalidation). NOTE: 1,000 hours of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for this course. NOTE: If this course and either Elevator Conversion I or The Essentials of Elevator Repair I are successfully completed, an additional 1 semester hour of credit is recommended as a shop in Applied Technology. A total of 7 semester hours would be recommended for a combination of any two courses. *NOTE: The current version of this course, dating from September 2000, appears in the preceding section.
Location:
Park West High School, 525 West 50th Street, New York, NY.
Length:
144 hours (36 weeks).
Dates:
September 1993 - August 2000.*
Objectives:

Students will be able to: explain the concept of preventive maintenance; describe procedures required for the service, maintenance, and replacement of the component elements of elevator systems and perform proper maintenance and parts replacement of elevator systems.

Instruction:

Topics include: pit equipment (sheaves, buffers, limits); shaft equipment (rails, cables, deflector sheaves, door equipment, interlocks, safeties, shoes/roller guides, wiring); leveling switches (magnets, operation, checks); motor room equipment (controller, governor, motor, generator); cab equipment (operator and gate switch, clutch, safety edge, electric eye); hall equipment (position indicators, push buttons, lights); customer and public expectations. Shop exercises include safety procedures, fuses, door operators, identification of worn or damaged parts, brushes, contacts, meters and test lights, lubrication, tracing commons, troubleshooting using prints, and cables.

Credit recommendation:
In the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours (2 lecture, 1 shop) in Elevator Maintenance in Applied Technology (8/94) (9/99 revalidation). NOTE: 1,000 hours of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for this course. *NOTE: The current version of this course, dating from September 2000, appears in the preceding section.
Location:
Park West High School, 525 West 50th Street, New York, NY.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 72 hours (18 weeks).

Dates:
Version 1: September 1986 - August 1993.* Version 2: September 1993 - August 2000.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2:  Students will be able to diagnose elevator problems involving hoistways, cabs, and motor room equipment of geared and gearless, and hydraulic elevator systems and make repairs to hoistway components, cab equipment, and motor room devices.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: Topics include: guide rails; buffers; governors; safeties; wire rope; roping traction machines; roping drum machines; compensating cables; governor cables and tiller ropes; flexible and roller guides; guide shoe problems; car frames; counterweights; car doors; hoistway doors; door operator; traveling cables; selector drives; troubleshooting electric motors; motor line-ups; brakes; commutator and brushes; elevator machines; worm and gear; thrust bearings; sheaves; installations; gearless machines; dumbwaiters; escalators; rigging; hydraulic elevators. Shop exercises cover rails, buffers, governors, safety, wire rope, car guide shoes, car frames and counterweights, doors, electric motors, brakes, machine operation.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the associate in occupational studies degree category, 3 semester hours (2 lecture, 1 shop) in Elevator Maintenance in Applied Technology (6/88). NOTE: 1,000 hours of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for this course. Version 2: In the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours as Elevator Repair in Applied Technology (7/93 revalidation) (8/94 revalidation) (9/99 revalidation). NOTE: 1,000 hours of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for this course. NOTE: If this course and either Elevator Conversion I or The Essentials of Elevator Maintenance I are successfully completed, an additional 1 semester hour of credit is recommended as a shop in Applied Technology. A total of 7 semester hours would be recommended for a combination of any two courses. *NOTE: The current version of this course, dating from September 2000, appears in the preceding section.

Location:
Park West High School, 525 West 50th Street, New York, NY.
Length:
144 hours (36 weeks).
Dates:
September 1993 - August 2000.*
Objectives:

Students will be able to: diagnose elevator problems involving hoistways, cabs, and motor room equipment of geared and gearless, and hydraulic elevator systems and make repairs to hoistway components, cab equipment, and motor room devices.

Instruction:

Topics include: guide rails; buffers; governors; safeties; wire rope; roping traction machines; roping drum machines; compensating cables; governor cables and tiller ropes; flexible and roller guides; guide shoe problems; car-frames; counterweights; car doors; hoistway doors; door operator; traveling cables; selector drives; troubleshooting electric motors; motor line-ups; brakes; commutator and brushes; elevator machines; worm and gear; thrust bearings; sheaves; installations; gearless machines; dumbwaiters; escalators; rigging; hydraulic elevators. Shop exercises cover rails, buffers, governors, safety, wire rope, car guide shoes, car frames and counterweights, doors, electric motors, brakes, machine operation.

Credit recommendation:
In the associate degree/certificate category, 3 semester hours (2 lecture, 1 shop) in Elevator Repair in Applied Technology or 1 semester hour in a certificate program in Building Superintendent Technology (8/94) (9/99 revalidation). NOTE: 1,000 hours of on-the-job practice were not considered in the credit recommendation for this course. *NOTE: The current version of this course, dating from September 2000, appears in the preceding section.

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