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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Rechtschaffen Institute of Judaic Studies - Psychology/Sociology

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: Describe the fundamentally different view of women and marriage between Judaism and ancient Greece and Rome; explain how interpretation of the Biblical story of the creation of man led to fundamentally different views of marriage between Judaism and Christianity; explain the motivation for marriage in Judaism – divine commandment and ethical imperative; understand the nature of the marriage bond as viewed by the classical sources; identify the Biblical and Rabbinic sources for various prohibited marriages; identify the sources for the various traditional criteria for spouse selection; understand the foundation of love in marriage; compare and contrast the traditional Jewish view of love with that of the secular world; understand the division of roles and responsibilities in marriage; understand the nature of divorce in traditional Judaism.

Instruction:

Major topics include: Perception of marriage in the ancient world, the Christian Church’s view on marriage, the biblical account of Adam as a basis for marriage, marriage as an obligation, the ethical imperative of marriage, marriage as a contract, the spouse selection process, the concept of love in general and in marriage, and the different roles of men and women in Jewish marriage.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Sociology, Religious Studies, History, Judaic Studies, Anthropology, or Jewish History (8/21).

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience students will be able to: demonstrate a proficiency and understanding of the processes involved in the raising of children in the traditional Jewish Society; the impact of education, disciplinary structure, social outlets, schooling, and accepted practices for children growing up and reaching maturity in the Orthodox Judaic world.  Given the broad spectrum of practice within the Judaic world, this course intends to cover as many of the different ethnicities that exist in the various cultures of Jewish society.  Students will also be able to take into account the historic perspectives which have influenced the upbringing of children in Jewish society; explore the origin of many practices which have emerged in modern times; understand the evolution of custom and law pertaining to children and adolescents in Jewish Society.  The student is expected to have attained a thorough understanding of both the modern Jewish Child, and his counterpart from yesteryore who may have lived many centuries earlier in both theory and practice and understand clearly how to bridge that gap.  

Instruction:

This course is taught in variable format.  The online format consists of a module-based format (with a required textbook) consisting of on-going and cumulative competency-based assessments (quizzes and final exam), open-ended essays, student activity and observations/reflections.  Final grade is based on a final exam.  Study materials are provided in the form of both a comprehensive study guide which generally follows the textbook closely, and study aids such as PowerPoint presentations and other digital media to aid in conveying the material.  Additional reading material may be assigned as either optional or mandatory for the course.  A frontal presentation is also available as an option for the course and the instructor may use a module-based format delivery to convey the material with the final exam being the sole determinant of the final grade.  

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religion, Sociology, Anthropology, History, or as a General Elective (8/21).

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: demonstrate a commanding knowledge of both the history and social significance of Jewish Cuisine throughout the ages; be aware of the primary Jewish sources which are replete with references to cuisine and its significance in both custom and law; demonstrate a distinct proficiency in being able to compare and contrast the potential impact of custom vs. law in the realm of Jewish Cuisine; identify the origin of many common practices involving the various victuals in modern Jewish society.   The student will be expected to be capable of tracing the roots of many common practices that have cropped up over the years, and in contrast, identify which customs are societally no longer practiced and provide an explanation for these vicissitudes involving cuisine in the Jewish world. 

Instruction:

Major topics include: social history of Jewish food, including Biblical and Talmudic concepts and rules of food and customs that have been adopted over the centuries in Jewish settlements in the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and more recently in the United States and Israel, how foods are used for ritual and festival purposes, how Jews played a role in spreading foods to other cultures, and modern attitudes of Jews toward different types of cuisine and different reasons for their food choices and the respective sociologically significance. This course is taught in variable format.  The online module-based format (with a required textbook) consists of on-going and cumulative competency-based assessments (quizzes and final exam), open-ended essays, student activity and observations/reflections.  The final grade is based on the final exam.  Study materials are provided for the student in the form of both a comprehensive study guide which generally follows the textbook closely, and other study aids such as PowerPoint presentations and other digital media to aid in conveying the material.  

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religion, Sociology, Anthropology, Jewish History, Nutritional Science or as a General Elective (8/21).

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

March 2021 - Present

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: display a clear understanding of the phenomenon which began in the 20th century and has continued into the present day in which Jews who were completely unaffiliated with their religion have begun to return to Orthodox Judaism; identify factors that led to this phenomenon; when it began; the social impact it has had on the Jewish nation as a whole; identify which demographics have been most affected and which less so; identify which organizations have been involved with outreach in order to spur on this movement and their agenda; and describe the sociological role the land of Israel has played in impacting this movement, and the establishment of Israel as an independent state in 1948. 

Instruction:

This course is taught in variable format.  The online format consists of a module based format (with a required textbook) consisting of on-going and cumulative competency based assessments (quizzes and final exam), open-ended essays, student activity and observations/reflections.   The final grade is  based on the final exam outcomes. Study materials are provided for the student in the form of both a comprehensive study guide which generally follows the textbook closely, and other study aids such as PowerPoint presentations and other digital media to aid in conveying the material. 

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religion, Sociology, Jewish History, or as a General Elective (8/21).

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:
October 2010 - Present.
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate the ability to identify, explain, analyze, interpret, and apply theoretical law; demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts related to blessings; identify major principles; analyze underlying premises of the principle laws and customs; and apply them to novel situations.

Instruction:

The final examination assesses students' ability to express knowledge about the fundamental Jewish laws and customs concerning blessings. Topics include: structure of a blessing; blessings made in vain; amen; discharging the obligation of others; initial blessings; sequence of blessings; principle versus subsidiary items; what is considered staples (mezonos); blessings on fruits and vegetables; wine, vegetable and fruit soups; and the general blessing of Shehakol.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division degree category, 3 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Philosophy, or Religion (2/11) (3/16 revalidation) (8/21 revalidation). NOTE: Students who complete the exam without the use of their notebooks could receive graduate credit.

Length:

Version 1 and 2: Varies; self study format. 

Dates:

Version 1: March 2016 - August 2021. Version 2: September 2021 - Present. 

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: demonstrate a broad and in-depth knowledge of the role of Jewish women in medieval society in both Ashkenazic and Sephardic countries; describe the typical woman’s social and economic status, as well as religious activity, and explain differences based on place of residence; explain the approach of various scholars in the field and the social causes they suggest to explain some of the practices and decrees which were made during this time period; and draw conclusions about how Jewish women in the Middle Ages viewed themselves and how others saw them. Version 2: Same as version 1.

Instruction:

Version 1: The final exam assesses students' knowledge of the role of the Jewish woman in Jewish society in the Middle Ages. Instructional topics focus on: economic standing and typical level of education, involvement in the community and religious practice, and reasons for various rabbinical ordinances decreed during this time period and their effects on women. The course covers major life events such as choosing a spouse, marriage, child rearing, and divorce as a way to understand how the status of women was affected by the way these things were handled in this time period and how social conditions, in turn, effected aspects of such events. The course provides an overall broad picture of how Jewish women viewed themselves in the Middle Ages and how they were viewed by others. Version 2: Same as version 1, and additional topics including: the Jewish woman’s role in modern and post-modern society; the changes that have come about as ripple effects from the feminism movement and the impact it has had on women in the Jewish world; how Jewish law has been applied in relationship to women due to modern advances in technology and apparel, understanding the new role of Jewish women in the workplace and attitudes that have shifted over time toward women in this arena.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in Sociology, Social Sciences, Behavioral Sciences, Judaic Studies, Women's Studies, or Social History (3/16). Version 2: In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Sociology, Social Sciences, Behavioral Sciences, Judaic Studies, Women's Studies, or Social History (8/21 revalidation). 

Length:

Varies; self-study format.

Dates:

March 2021 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the learning experience, students will be able to: identify the primary norms and behaviors of modern chassidic Jews; compare and contrast Chassidic society to its non-Chassidic counterpart; compare and contrast Chassidic society to other religious minority groups; recognize behavioral patterns; clarify the goals and motivations driving the chassidic communities; describe the religious background to Chassidic life; generate hypotheses about the Chassidic Community based on focused research; identify the ways the Chassidim of Williamsburg have changed with time and familiarize themselves with essential terms and phrases used by the Chassidic Community.

Instruction:

Major topics include:  the Jews of Williamsburg their history and origins, community structure in Europe as compared to the United States, the family unit, and social organizations, the economic activities of the community including shops and stores, merchandise, and advertising techniques, religious and professional services, as well as nonprofessional occupations, and the role of the Chassidic Rebbe as both a religious figurehead and a political leader.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Sociology, Judaic Studies, Religion, United States History, General History, or as General Elective (8/21).

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