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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

Jewish Philosophy - Center for Academic and Religious Excellence

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Proficiency examination administered at the Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.) testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Length:

Varies.

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the examination, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: explore his/her personal relationship with G-d via prayer, Torah study, and fulfilling the commandments; describe the role of the Jewish People vis-à-vis the nations of the world; differentiate between the role of G-d’s guidance in the life of an individual versus the lives of the nations of the world; and explore the interaction between body and soul.

Instruction:

In order to prepare for this examination, students study Derech Hashem by Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzato. Topics include: the nature of the Creator; man’s understanding of G-d; the creation of the world; the purpose of the creation of the world; man’s purpose in the world and his relationship with G-d; the physical vs. the spiritual realm; the role of Providence in the life of every individual; the study of Torah and the effects of the commandments on the individual; the animal aspect of man versus the divine aspect; praying to G-d; and man’s obligation to G-d; man’s responsibilities in this world.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religious Studies, or Philosophy (6/15).

Location:

Proficiency examination administered at the Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.) testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Length:

Varies.

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the examination, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: discuss the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy of G-d and their implementation on a human level; analyze how the Thirteen Attributes may be seen in the lives of our sages; describe the purpose of man’s life in the world; and compare and contrast reward and punishment in this world and in the World to Come.

Instruction:

In order to prepare for this examination, students study the basic ideas of Rabbi Moshe Cordevero’s book Tomer Devora. Principles covered include: the upper and lower levels of holiness; the three levels of the soul; the tzelem – one’s physical form; the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy; incorporating the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy into our lives, by: visiting the sick; giving charity to the poor; acting pleasantly towards others; and helping and supporting students of Torah.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religious Studies, or Philosophy (6/15).

Location:

Proficiency examination administered at the Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.) testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Length:

Varies.

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the examination, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: demonstrate familiarity with the Artscroll commentary on the Morning Prayers (Shacharis); explore the content and the power of prayer; identify how to make proper requests of G-d in prayer; focus on the meaning and proper pronunciation of words; build a relationship with G-d through prayer; pray with concentration and focus; and pray in a physically appropriate manner vis-à-vis position, posture, and time; define ways to maximize serenity, focus, and spiritual connection while praying.

Instruction:

In order to prepare for this examination, students study the following topics: successful prayer; preparation for prayer; maximizing our time while praying; developing the proper attitude toward prayer; specific requests while praying; the essence and purpose of the morning blessings; the connections between various prayers – ie. Boruch She’amar and Yishtabach; and the purpose of each of the Blessings of Shemoneh Esrei; miscellaneous additional blessings.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Judaic Studies, Religious Studies, or Philosophy (6/15).

Location:

Proficiency examination administered at the Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.) testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Length:

Varies.

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the examination, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: recognize speech that constitutes slander; differentiate between slander and gossip; respond to situational questions appropriately reflecting a clear understanding of what constitutes slander and gossip; discriminate between pieces of information that should and should not be communicated; and identify situations when it is necessary to ask direction of a Rabbinic authority.

Instruction:

In order to prepare for this examination, students study the following topics: the destructive power of slander and all its ramifications; details of the laws of slander; public versus private information; listening to slander; intimations of slander and their relevance; parameters of constructive purpose; laws of gossip; and laws and application of judging others favorably.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Jewish Law, Judaic Studies, Jewish Philosophy, or Religious Studies (6/15).

Location:

Proficiency examination administered at the Center for Academic and Religious Excellence (C.A.R.E.) testing center or authorized proctor sites.

Length:

Varies.

Dates:

June 2015 - Present.

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the examination, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency as follows: discuss man’s mission in this world and the need for self-improvement; identify character traits, positive and negative, and their impact on daily life; select the appropriate tools to make lasting changes in character development; and apply the concepts that have been studied to improve one’s personal relationships.

Instruction:

In order to prepare for this examination, students study the following topics: man’s mission in his world; the qualities of a man who is just and how to acquire them. These qualities include: zehirus – vigilance; zerizus – alacrity; nekiyus – cleanliness from temptation in human interaction; perishus – abstinence; tahara – purity; chassidus – piety, in deeds and intent; anavah – humility; yiras cheit – fear of sin; kedushah – holiness.

Credit recommendation:

In the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 6 semester hours in Ethics, Judaic Studies, Religious Studies, or Philosophy (6/15).

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