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National College Credit Recommendation Service

Board of Regents  |  University of the State of New York

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English Courses-National Paralegal College

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

February 2014 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: discuss the literary canon, including issues of history, culture, race, ethnicity and gender; critically read and explicate texts written in a variety of modes; identify and analyze fundamental literary elements and devices within a text; identify and characterize the important features of nonfiction, fiction, speech and poetry; synthesize ideas in literary form and use literary terms in historical context; develop and carry out research-based writings based on literary context including locating, evaluating, organizing and incorporating information; write clear, grammatically and syntactically correct sentences; and correctly apply MLA format to all written work.

Instruction:

This course provides students with an overview of the important writers and works of 500 years of American literature from the post - World War II era through the present. Nonfiction essays, documents, poems, speeches and short stories relevant to their historical times are introduced and discussed in addition to works of fiction. Students also choose additional pieces of literature in a sub-genre of their choice to read and discuss. Evaluation criteria include: assignments; class participation; and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or as a General Education elective (3/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

November 2013 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify and employ rhetorical appeal in written materials; detect logical fallacies in text and visual media and eliminate them; identify and analyze the use of value and descriptive assumptions; develop writing topics for a given scenario; broaden or narrow a topic and create effective topic sentences; write focused thesis statements; write both broad and detailed outlines for a researched work of writing; create effective topic sentences; refine grammar and mechanics to promote clear writing; evaluate and use sources responsibly and effectively; and employ MLA citation and formatting style.

Instruction:

This is a basic course in English composition and rhetoric. Students learn and engage in critical thinking and writing, as well as review and improve basic grammar skills and writing style. Thesis statements, topic sentences and overall organization within each piece of writing is the focus of this course. At the conclusion of the course, students develop personal strategies for becoming better writers, readers and critical thinkers. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments; class participation; and a final exam.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or as a General Education elective (3/18).

Location:

Various; distance learning format.

Length:

Varies; self-study format. 

Dates:

May 2016 - Present. 

Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: demonstrate mastery of clear and effective writing through carefully written analyses of exemplary models of literature; identify and apply in an essay, various rhetorical modes in English Composition, focusing upon the expository (i.e., comparison/contrast) and argumentative (i.e., literary argument) approach; identify elements of a theme and its evidence presented by the author throughout a piece of literature; effectively read a poem, analyze its components, rhythm, and how a poem sounds versus how it reads, and ultimately demonstrate improved mastery of word choice and poetic devices in their own writing; actively engage literary works to develop creative interpretations through an individualized “strong” reading of classic short stories, poetry, and drama; working within the context of selected pieces of fiction, students compose a literary argument with appropriate documentation; develop techniques for addressing opposing views to insure the basic theme of a paper is adequately, though ethically supported; recognize and assess the philosophical or analytic approaches literary critics adopt as “templates” for understanding what a piece of writing means and identify any potential author or critic ideological bias; write an in-depth research paper displaying a discriminating focus upon what constitutes good literature and demonstrating facility with MLA format and its specific requirements for citing references; and recognize various forms of plagiarism, both “benign” and intentional.

Instruction:

This writing course builds upon the skills developed in English Composition II (ENG-101). This course develops students’ critical writing and thinking skills through in-depth reading and analysis of literature, translating students’ thoughts across a range of disciplines. Students develop these critical reading and writing strategies by reading and analyzing engaging works of fiction, non-fiction, drama and poetry, they explore various literary theories and forms and discuss how these can affect interpretation; they research and address opposing views of critics’ interpretations of the literary works and assert their own interpretations. Students complete a research paper and argue a position from textual evidence to support their theses, applying the documentation requirements of the MLA. Evaluation criteria include: required readings, essay assignments; class participation; and a final exam. Prerequisite: English Composition I (ENG-101).

 

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 3 semester hours in English or as a General Education elective (3/18).

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