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National College Credit Recommendation Service

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Current Courses - Arnot Ogden Medical Center School of Nursing

Descriptions and credit recommendations for all evaluated learning experiences

Location:
Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length:
135 hours (9 weeks); includes 45 hours of theory, 12 hours of nursing laboratory experience and 78 hours of supervised clinical experience.
Dates:
September 1999 - Present.*
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply moral, legal, ethical, and professional standards in health assessment of selected individual clients; demonstrate assessment skills based on scientific principles in determining an individual's healthy physiological and psychosocial response; utilize assessment skills and critical thinking to individualize the nursing process for clients at various developmental levels; modify communication skills to the individual client to facilitate the effective implementation of the nursing process; apply teaching concepts and principles appropriate to the individual's developmental level in assisting the individual client to achieve a healthier existence; and utilize the problem-solving approach to assess one's own learning needs and to develop a plan of action.

Instruction:
The nurse's application of developmental, family and socio-cultural aspects used in gathering the health history are stressed throughout the course. History taking and physical assessment of the individual throughout the lifespan to include inspection, palpation, auscultation and percussion is addressed. The emphasis is on normal findings and developmental variations; adverse effects of medications, and laboratory data are incorporated. Health promotion and education are seen as vital components in this course. Assessments are also discussed in admission, pre-and post-operative care and in discharging an individual in an acute care setting. Assessment tools, i.e., (DDS), are examined.
Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 3 semester hours in Health Assessment in Nursing (6/02 revalidation) (6/07 revalidation) (6/12 revalidation) (6/17 revalidation). *NOTE: Earlier versions of this course are listed in course groupings with either Nutrition (110) and Pharmacology (120) (September 1979 to March 1985) or Pharmacology (120) (April 1985 to December 1990) or Nursing (101) and Nursing (102) (May 1990 to August 1999). Please refer to the course groupings beginning with Nursing (101 and 102) in the 1990 Directory and in the Retired Courses subsection for this organization for further information.

Location:
Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length:
Version 1: 225 hours (9 weeks); includes 45 hours of theory and 180 hours of supervised clinical experience. Version 2: 240 hours (7 weeks); includes 60 hours of theory and 180 hours of supervised clinical experience.
Dates:
Version 1: July 1992 - March 2001.* Version 2: April 2001 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: critique moral, legal, ethical, and professional standards which are inherent in the scope of nursing; choose scientific and nursing principles for the performance of nursing activities which assist groups of clients to respond to their holistic health needs; relate the nursing process to meet the needs of groups of clients as they cope throughout the wellness-illness continuum; use communication techniques effectively in the management, direction, and coordination of quality client care; administer principles of the teaching-learning process appropriate to the developmental level of clients to assist in the achievement of their potential; and apply critical thinking and decision making while caring for a group of clients.

Instruction:

Version 1 and 2: The course is designed to assist students to move into the role of the professional nurse. Major emphasis is on the nurse as a health team member and the nurse as a leader/manager in the care of groups of clients. Topics consistent with current issues and trends in nursing, as well as nursing traditions, are explored, recognizing that these will have an impact on nursing practice in the future. The clinical component includes management of groups of patients in roles such as charge nurse, staff nurse, nurse educator, community nurse, etc.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours in Leadership/Trends and Issues in Nursing (7/93) (7/97 revalidation) (6/02 revalidation) (6/07 revalidation) (6/12 revalidation) (6/17 revalidation). *NOTE: An earlier version of this course is listed in the Retired Courses subsection for this organization. Further, the earliest version, dating from March 1982 to February 1987, was listed under the course grouping that begins with Nursing (201). Please refer to the 1990 Directory for further information.

Location:
Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length:

Course 1:  234 hours; includes 78 hours of theory and 156 hours of supervised clinical experience. Course 2: Version 1: 312 hours (13 weeks); includes 78 hours of theory and 234 hours of supervised clinical experience. Course 2: Version 2: 316 Hours (13 weeks); includes 79 hours of theory and 237 hours of supervised clinical experience. Course 3: Version 1: 312 hours (13 weeks); includes 78 hours of theory and 234 hours of supervised clinical experience. Course 3: Version 2: 316 hours  (13 weeks); includes 79 hours of theory and 237 hours of supervised clinical experience.

Dates:

Course 1: July 1991 - Present.* Course 2: Version 1: January 1992 - May 2017. Course 2: Version 2: June 2017 - Present. Course 3: Version 1: April 1992 - May 2015.*  Course 3: Version 2: June 2017 - Present.

Objectives:

Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: practice accountability for quality improvement, consumer advocacy and cost effective use of health care resources within the legal/ethical standards of the nursing profession in providing care for diverse medical-surgical patients/consumers across the life span and their families; apply knowledge from the biological, behavioral, social and nursing sciences in providing safe, technically competent and holistic nursing care of patients/consumers of various ages and their families responding to complex medical-surgical health problems; practice as an effective member of the interdisciplinary health team through integrating critical thinking, collaboration, nursing process and shared decision making to evaluate primary, secondary and tertiary interventions to assist patients/consumers/families experiencing complex medical-surgical problems achieve desired outcomes at various points along the wellness-illness continuum; demonstrate a caring relationship, therapeutic communication and positive interpersonal skills to promote effective individual and health team interaction to achieve consumer satisfaction in patients/consumers/families with complex acute and chronic medical-surgical problems; function as a nurse teacher to promote, maintain and restore wellness through sharing of knowledge, skills and anticipatory guidance needed for the medical-surgical patient/consumer/family to achieve self-care and optimal health; and exhibit qualities of self-development that indicates personal and professional growth. Course 2: Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: respect the philosophy, beliefs, interests and needs of each client with biopsychosocial alterations of major life functions; discuss legal and professional ramifications of caring for acutely ill individuals; relate theoretical and scientific nursing principles to the human responses of acutely ill clients whose health patterns are dysfunctional; integrate the nursing process to implement a plan of care with clients who have rapidly changing biopsychosocial health conditions; use therapeutic communication techniques to distinguish between highly unstable functional and/or organic problems in order to provide support to the client; implement the teaching-learning process appropriate to the developmental levels of individuals (pediatric, adult, and elderly) and their families to stabilize and/or improve fluctuating situations; and analyze self perception regarding personal and professional growth. Course 3: Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: relate legal, moral, ethical, and professional principles to critically ill clients and their families; use knowledge of the biopsychosocial and nursing sciences relevant to the specific responses that occur as the clients respond to problems of critical life function; adapt the nursing process to assist critically ill clients in the restoration of their homeokinesis; interact with members of the health team in attaining the highest level possible on the wellness-illness continuum for clients with critical illnesses; appraise the teaching-learning process applicable to the critically ill clients and families at various developmental levels (pediatric, adult, and elderly); and examine own personal and professional development as it applies to critical care situations.

Instruction:

Course 1: This course addresses the natural, biological, and physiological defense mechanisms that are stressed during an individual's illness. Major topics include: concepts related to cellular injury, altered immune responses, and fluid and electrolyte imbalances, specific client responses throughout the lifespan (pediatric, adult, and elderly) related to disruptions of musculoskeletal, integumentary, gastrointestinal, reproductive and chronic respiratory systems, problems related to infections, infectious diseases and diabetes, continued assessment skills, nutrition and pharmacology and client teachings within primarily an acute care setting. Teaching methods include skills labs, case studies, pre/post tests, lecture, films, and computerized programmed instruction. Concepts from the classroom lecture are applied in the clinical setting. Course 2: Version 1 and 2: This course deals with clients across the lifespan (pediatric, adult, elderly) who are receiving acute care for an exacerbation of a chronic health problem. These problems relate to changes in cellular structure, alterations to the blood forming organs, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, metabolic alterations, and cardiovascular alterations. Integrated throughout the course are nutritional, psychological, pharmacological, social, legal, and ethical concepts. Comprehensive assessments of functional and dysfunctional health patterns are conducted for planning nursing interventions with a focus on teaching strategies which enable the client to gain homeokinesis. Teaching methods include lecture, case-studies, seminars, pre and post-clinical conferences, and group presentations. A research paper is required. Concepts from the classroom lecture are applied in the clinical setting. The student selects clinical learning experiences which correlate theory with clinical experience. Students participate in nursing laboratories for competency in advanced IV therapy and EKG interpretation. Course 3: Version 1 and 2: This course deals with highly complex clients across the lifespan (pediatric, adult, elderly) whose human responses are of an unstable critical nature and who is attempting to adjust to changes related to gas exchange, sensori-neuromuscular dysfunction, interference in cardiovascular circulation or impact and effects of multiple trauma. Technological devices are used for assessment as well as for life sustaining interventions. The student prepares for identification of rapidly changing human needs, analysis of data, decision making, multiple nursing diagnoses, stress in the client, family, and/or nurse, and revision of care. Principles of therapeutic nutrition and pharmacology are integrated throughout the course. Concepts from the classroom lecture are applied in the clinical setting. Clinical experiences range from the neonatal unit to the adult critical care unit. Students participate in nursing laboratories for competency in airway suctioning, trauma assessment, advanced neurological assessment, and hemodynamic monitoring.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1, Courses 2 and 3: Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 12 semester hours as Medical/Surgical Nursing Across the Lifespan (7/93 revalidation) (7/97 revalidation) (6/02 revalidation) (6/07 revalidation) (6/12 revalidation) (6/17 revalidation). NOTE: Course 1, 2 and 3 must all be completed to receive credit. *NOTE: For information on an earlier version of these courses, please refer to the Retired Courses section for this organization. Further, the earliest versions, dating from March 1981 to January 1987, September 1981 to February 1987, and November 1981 to August 1987 respectively, were listed in a course grouping that included Nursing (303) in the 1990 Directory.

Location:
Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 36 hours (9 weeks). Version 3: 37.5 hours (9 weeks). 

Dates:

Version 1: April 1991 - August 2001. Version 2: September 2001 -  May 2017. Version 3: June 2017 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: discuss the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of individuals from birth to old age; identify the social and cultural influences affecting our evolution as human beings; identify developmental tasks, given a specific theory, for each stage of the lifespan; compare moral development and social convention; describe the dynamics of death as an event and dying as a process; and relate knowledge of one's own development and the development of those with whom one interacts. Version 2 and 3: Same as Version 1; in addition, discuss the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of individuals from conception to old age.

Instruction:
Version 1, 2, and 3: Major topics include: an overview of the major topics involved in lifespan development from infancy to death, including beginnings and infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence, early, middle, and late adulthood, dying and spirituality.
Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 2 semester hours as an elective in Psychology (7/91) (7/97 revalidation) (6/02 revalidation) (6/07 revalidation) (6/12 revalidation) (6/17 revalidation).

Location:
Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length:
Course 1: 104 hours (13 weeks); includes 52 hours of theory, 21.5 hours of nursing laboratory experience, and 30.5 hours of supervised clinical experience. Course 2: 104 hours (13 weeks); includes 52 hours of theory, 12 hours of nursing laboratory experience and 40 hours of supervised clinical experience.
Dates:

Course 1 and 2: September 1999 - Present.*

Objectives:

Course 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify moral, legal, ethical and professional standards for nursing practice; identify scientific principles underlying selected nursing actions to promote and/or maintain health; differentiate between the components of the nursing process utilized to assist individual client's achievement and/or maintenance of health/wellness; describe the process of effective communication in promoting interaction with individual clients, faculty, peers and nursing teams; recognize teaching and learning principles as they apply to selected client teaching situations; and actively participate in the learning process through shared experiences, discussions and group interactions. Course 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: utilize moral, legal, ethical and professional standards of practice, with guidance, in selected situations; implement selected nursing actions based on scientific principles to promote healthy client response; apply the nursing process with guidance to assist hospitalized individual adult clients to achieve and/or maintain optimum level of health/wellness; employ facilitative communication skills, with guidance, in interacting with individual clients, faculty, peers and nursing teams; utilize teaching actions appropriate to the individual's learning needs to achieve a healthier existence; and adapt assertiveness skills in identifying and meeting one's own learning needs.

Instruction:

Course 1: Nursing Theory and Concepts: historical, legal, ethical and professional issues; health and illness: individual, family, community; holism; nursing and health care delivery system; homeostasis; Maslow's hierarchy of human needs; stress/adaptation. Nursing Process: assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementing, and evaluating; nutrition in health; teaching learning concepts: the theoretical basis for client teaching; legal aspects of documentation; techniques used to develop a therapeutic relationship; group dynamics; mental health concepts of self and self-esteem. Application of the Nursing Process to the following: therapeutic environment, client safety/comfort, restraints, body mechanics, and asepsis-microbial safety; personal care/hygiene; mobility/immobility; body alignment; movement. Course 2: Major concepts include: adaptations to acute and chronic illness/disability; anxiety as a common response to stress of illness; culture, ethnicity, spirituality and religious beliefs as factors that affect response in health and illness. Application of nursing process to the following: vital signs measurement; medication administration; pain; sensory alterations; wound care and healing; thermal applications; oxygen administration; gastrointestinal and urinary elimination; and rest and sleep.

Credit recommendation:

Course 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours in Nursing Fundamentals (6/02 revalidation) (6/07 revalidation) (6/12 revalidation) (6/17 revalidation). *NOTE: Earlier versions of these courses are listed in course groupings with Nutrition (110) and Pharmacology (120) (September 1979 to March 1985) or Pharmacology (120) (April 1985 to December 1990) or Nursing (103) (May 1990 to August 1999). Please refer to the course groupings beginning with Nursing (101 and 102) in the 1990 Directory and in the Retired Courses subsection for this organization for further information.

Location:
Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 234 (13 weeks); includes 78 hours of theory,156 hours of supervised clinical experience.

Dates:
Version 1: September 1991 - May 2000. Version 2: June 2000 - Present.
Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify moral, legal, ethical, and professional issues that affect clients and families throughout the childbearing cycle; incorporate new nursing concepts based on existing nursing and scientific principles throughout the antepartal, intrapartal, neonatal, and postpartal phased of childbearing; use the nursing process to assist clients/families throughout the childbearing cycle to meet their biopsychosocial needs; use communication techniques in interactions with clients/families as an effective member of the health team to meet the stressors of childbearing; and exhibit qualities of self-development that indicate personal and professional growth.

Instruction:

Version 1: Topics cover the antepartal, intrapartal, postpartal, and neonatal phases of the childbearing family and women's gynecological health. Antepartal content includes normal development of pregnancy, prenatal nursing care and such high-risk conditions as premature rupture of membranes, and pregnancy induced hypertension, diabetes, and cardiac problems. Intrapartal content includes normal labor and delivery. Postpartal content includes normal postpartum care and complications such as hemorrhage, infection, and phlebitis. Newborn content includes normal newborn and nursing care. Complications such as prematurity, infection, and jaundice are presented. Clinical experiences augment instruction in each of these phases. They range from observation and participation in normal and high-risk prenatal care at an obstetrician's office and in a hospital setting, childbirth preparation classes, labor and delivery, caring for normal and high-risk infants in a hospital setting to assess the developmental differences between the normal newborn and those with problems. Students prepare a position paper on a current topic and a literature search to augment the lecture and regular clinical conferences. Version 2: All topics in Version 1; in addition, cultural diversity, alternative medicine, critical thinking scenarios, case studies.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1 and 2: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours as Maternity Nursing (7/93) (7/97 revalidation) (6/02 revalidation) (6/07 revalidation) (6/12 revalidation) (6/17 revalidation). 

Location:
Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length:

Version 1 and 2: 216 (9 weeks); includes 72 hours of theory and 144 hours of supervised clinical experience. Version 3: 316 hours (13 weeks); includes 79 hours of theory and 237 hours of supervised clinical experience. 

Dates:

Version 1: April 1991 - August 1999. Version 2: September 1999 - May 2017. Version 3: June 2017 - Present.  

Objectives:

Version 1 and 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply moral, legal, professional, and ethical standards with emphasis on confidentiality with clients who have deficits in ego functioning; use nursing and scientific principles of mental health and apply the nursing process to meet the holistic health needs of psychiatric clients; recognize the impact of developmental tasks in relation to the client's chronological age, personality development, and behavior; use therapeutic communication and attending skills to communicate with a psychiatric client; employ teaching concepts and principles to assist clients and their families learn adaptive ego functions; and develop self-understanding and self-esteem to facilitate therapeutic use of self. Version 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: demonstrate accountability for continuous quality improvement, research-based practice, consumer advocacy, and cost-effective use of health care resources within the legal/ethical standards while caring for acutely ill patients; integrate knowledge from biological, behavioral, social, and nursing sciences to provide safe, technically competent and holistic nursing care to acutely ill patients; function as an effective member of an interdisciplinary healthcare team by utilizing critical-thinking and nursing process skills to implement a plan of care for patients that have rapidly changing health needs; Incorporate a caring relationship, therapeutic communication, positive interpersonal and information management skills to provide support to the patient and family; integrate principles of the teaching/learning process to promote, maintain, and restore optimal wellness to the patient experiencing an acute illness; and demonstrate a commitment to being a contributing member of the nursing profession through analysis of personal and professional growth.

Instruction:

Version 1: Through the nursing process, students make assessments of individuals throughout the lifespan (pediatric, adult, elderly). Assessment includes clients' strengths and weaknesses, functional and dysfunctional responses, level of ego functioning and developmental stage of functioning. Content includes individual personality development, functions and structure of the family including both functional and dysfunctional concepts, emotional and psychiatric disorders of infancy, childhood, adolescence and adulthood, including autism, childhood pervasive disorders, conduct disorders, adjustment disorders, suicide and the major psychiatric diseases, psychophysiological diseases, substance abuse, child abuse, spouse abuse, and elder abuse. Students participate with groups of clients in conjunction with planned activities and independently select clinical learning experiences which correlate content with clinical experience. Clinical experiences involve rotations to various mental health units and facilities and experiences with clients across the lifespan. Students write a process recording to document techniques used with various clients and analyze the process of communication. The clinical portion of the course is designed to enable the student to care for clients with psychiatric/mental health disorders. Version 2 and 3: Same as Version 1; in addition, concept of crisis.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2,  and 3: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category OR in the upper division baccalaureate degree category, 4 semester hours as Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing (7/93) (7/97 revalidation) (6/02 revalidation) (6/07 revalidation) (6/12 revalidation) (6/17 revalidation).

Location:
Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length:
37.5 hours (9 weeks).
Dates:
September 1999 - Present.*
Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply the principles of normal nutrition in selecting personal diet; identify the essential nutrients and describe their role in maintaining normal nutrition throughout life; answer questions, with guidance, concerning normal nutrition and nutritive value of foods; identify factors in a person's socio-economic background which influence food habits; use reliable sources of information and reference materials in the area of food and nutrition; discuss various dietary patterns in which religion, culture, and food preference play an important role in food habits; list the local organizations that would provide nutritional assistance to clients; write the essential nutrients and their role in maintaining normal nutrition throughout all various stages of life; determine nutritional assessments and dietary data gathering; name dietary supplements or feedings that would help meet the nutritional needs of the client with nutritional impairment; and identify reliable sources of information and reference materials in the area of food and nutrition.

Instruction:

Major topics include: nutrients; their actions; interaction and balance in relationship to health and disease; processes by which nutrients are ingested, digested, absorbed, transported, and disposal of their end products during the lifespan; and the social, economic, cultural implications of food and eating.

Credit recommendation:

In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Nutrition (6/02 revalidation) (6/07 revalidation) (6/12 revalidation) (6/17 revalidation). *NOTE: Please refer to the Retired Courses subsection for this organization for information on earlier versions of this course.

Location:
Arnot Ogden Medical Center, Roe Avenue, Elmira, NY.
Length:

Version 1: 36 hours (13 weeks); in addition, 10 hours of independent study on computation of doses. Version 2: 36 hours (13 weeks). Version 3, 4, and 5: 37.5 hours (13 weeks).

Dates:

Version 1: August 1990 - May 2000.* Version 2: June 2000 - August 2001. Version 3: September 2001 - November 2001. Version 4 and 5: December 2002 - Present.

Objectives:

Version 1: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: provide for clients requiring drug therapy, apply drug standards and current legislation that promotes a safe therapeutic environment; discuss the principles of pharmacotherapeutics and pharmacodynamics used to assess, plan, implement and evaluate drug therapy plans; identify the psychological and emotional aspects of drug therapy in relation to clients' return to optimal health; accurately compute medication dosages in order to maintain a safe therapeutic environment; identify the teaching/learning process and assessment factors used in preparing clients for discharge on maintenance drug therapy; discuss nursing responsibilities that are inherent in safe administration of medications; and recognize alternate lifestyle patterns inherent in self-medication, the use of over-the-counter drugs, street drugs, drug abuse and misuse, without becoming judgmental. Version 2: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be to: apply drug standards and current legislation that promotes a safe therapeutic environment; discuss the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics used to assess, plan, implement and evaluate drug therapy plans; identify the psychological and emotional aspects of drug therapy in relation to clients' return to optimal health; accurately compute medication dosages in order to maintain a safe therapeutic environment; discuss the teaching/learning process and assessment factors used in preparing clients for discharge on maintenance drug therapy; and recognize alternate lifestyle patterns inherent in self-medication, the use of over-the-counter drugs, street drugs, drug abuse and misuse, without becoming judgmental. Version 3: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: apply drug standards and current legislation that promotes a safe therapeutic environment; discuss the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics used to assess, plan, implement and evaluate drug therapy plans; identify the psychological and emotional aspects of drug therapy in relation to clients' return to optimal health; accurately compute medication dosages in order to maintain a safe therapeutic environment; discuss the teaching/learning process and assessment factors used in preparing clients for discharge on maintenance drug therapy; and recognize alternate lifestyle patterns inherent in self-medication, and the use of over-the-counter drugs. Version 4: Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: identify the moral, legal, and ethical issues, the professional nursing standards, current drug legislation, and their significant implications in promoting a safe, therapeutic environment for clients/patients/consumers requiring drug therapy; apply knowledge from the biological, behavioral, social science, and nursing sciences to provide safe and competent medication administration to consumers of various ages and their families; discuss collaborative critical thinking and the nursing process in order to achieve primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions for health care consumers undergoing maintenance drug therapy; accurately compute medication dosages in order to maintain a safe therapeutic environment for clients/patients/consumers of various ages that require drug therapy to attain optimal health; utilize the principles of teaching/learning/anticipatory guidance to enhance consumer knowledge of drug therapy and improve their compliance during self-care; and identify his/her own personal and professional learning goals that focus on providing safe and therapeutic drug administration to individuals across the life span at any point along the wellness-illness continuum. Version 5: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: identify the moral, legal, and ethical issues, the professional nursing standards, current drug legislation and their significant implications in promoting a safe, therapeutic environment for patients/patients/s requiring drug therapy; apply knowledge from the biological, behavioral, social sciences and nursing sciences to provide safe and competent medication administration to patients of various ages; discuss collaborative critical thinking and the nursing process in order to achieve primary, secondary and tertiary interventions for the healthcare of patients undergoing maintenance drug therapy; accurately compute medication dosages in order to maintain a safe therapeutic environment for patients of various ages that require drug therapy to attain optimal health; utilize the principles of teaching/learning/anticipatory guidance to enhance knowledge of drug therapy and improve their compliance during self-care; and identify their own personal and professional learning goals that focus on providing safe and therapeutic drug administration to individuals across the life span at any point along the wellness-illness continuum. 

Instruction:

Version 1: Principles of pharmacotherapeutics and pharmacodynamics; psychologic and physiologic concepts related to drug therapy, drug abuse, and drug misuse; alterations in drug therapy responses in the geriatric client; general drug classifications utilized in adult clients encountering alterations in homeostasis related to pain, need for mental and physical rest, inflammatory and infectious responses, and disturbances in bowel elimination; computations of medication dosages. Version 2 and 3: Principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; psychologic and physiologic concepts related to drug therapy, drug abuse, and drug misuse; alterations in drug therapy responses in the geriatric client; general drug classifications utilized in adult clients encountering alterations in homeostasis related to pain, need for mental and physical rest, inflammatory and infectious responses, and disturbances in bowel elimination; practice in the computations of medication dosages. Critical thinking and client teaching is emphasized by utilizing the nursing process and selected case studies. Version 4 and 5: Same as Version 2 or 3; in addition, neurological and neuromuscular agents; respiratory agents; and cardiovascular agents.

Credit recommendation:

Version 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5: In the lower division baccalaureate/associate degree category, 2 semester hours in Pharmacology (7/91 revalidation) (7/97 revalidation) (6/02 revalidation) (6/07 revalidation) (6/12 revalidation) (6/17 revalidation). *NOTE: Earlier versions of this course are listed under the course grouping beginning with Nursing (101 and 102). Please refer to the 1990 Directory and to the Retired Courses subsection for this organization.

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